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Full text of "General catalog : announcements and faculty list ..."

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in 2013 



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THE IOWA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



THE ANNUAL 

STATEMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 
1879. 



THE IOWA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 
THE ANNUAL 

STATEMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 
t 

1879. 



The Annual Statement which is published 
by authority of the Board of Trustees, contains 
all the information which is necessary to those 
who desire to become students in the Iowa 
Agricultural College. 

The Statement will be sent free of charge to 
all persons who apply for it. 



PRINTED AT THE 

COLLEGE Printing Office 

IJY BTUDENT LABOR. 



THE IOWA 
AGRICULTURAL 












THE 



STATEMENT 



FOR THE YEAR 



1879 



Science with practice. 



BY THE COLLEGE. 

AMES. 

1879. 



Iowa Agricultural College. 



CALENDAR FOR 1879-80. 



1879. 

Xovember 5 to 12. Term examinations. 

Monday ^^m., ^ ) Address before the Literary Societies. 

Tuesday^ :30^p.m., ^ | Address before the Trustees. 
Wednesday,^ p. m., j Commencement Exericses . 

Winter Vacation 
From November 13, 1879, to March 2, 1880. 

1880. 

Monday, March 1. Term opens. 

M-'ecSiay, March |; [ Entrance Examinations. 
Thursday, March 4. Recitations begin. 

Suly 2 ! [ Term Examinations. 
Friday, 7:30 P. M^ 2 j Junior Exhibition . 

Saturday, July 3. Summer Recess begins. 

Tuesday, July 20. Second Term begins, 

wlXesday, July 2L \ Ent ™" c e Examinations. 
Wednesday, July 21. Recitations begin. 

to Nov 10 [ Term Examinations. 
' <l ' ' Nfovember 8. [ A(]dress before the Literary Societies. 

^^^NovTmfcr 0. \ Address before the Trustees - 

Wednesday, r ., . ^ 

November 10 r Commencement Exercises. 

Winter Vacation 
From November 11, 1880, to March 1, 1881. 



; r ;,/S> A>^t' 



TTie Board of Trustees. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



The Hon. BUEL SHERMAN, Fredericksburg, - - 1880. 

The Hon. G. H. WRIGHT, Sioux City, 1880. 

The Hon. JOHN N. DIXON, Oskaloosa, - - - - 1882. 

The Hon. IT. G. LITTLE, Grinnell, 1882. 

The Hon. WILLIAM McCLINTOCK, W^est Union, - 1882. 



6 Iowa Agricultural College. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 
The Hon. John N. Dixon, Oskaloosa, - - Chairman. 
E. W. Stanton, Ames, ------ Secretary. 

W. D. Lucas, Ames, - Treasurer. 

J. L GtEddes, Ames, - - - - Deputy Treasurer. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Executive Committee— -Trustees Wright, Little, and McClin- 

TOCK. 

Committee on Farm — Trustees Little, McClintock, and Sher- 
man. 

Committee on Horticulture— -Trustees Sherman, Dixon, and 
Wright. 

Committee on Workshop — Trustees Wright and McClintock. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting of the board of trustees is held on the second 
Wednesday in November; the other meetings are held in the latter 
part of November and in May. 



Officers of Instruction. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION. 



A. S. Welch, LL. D., President, 

Professor of Psychology and Philosophy of Science. 

Gen. J. L. Geddes, President Pro tern., 

Professor of Military Tactics and Engineering. 

W. H. Wynn, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of English Literature. 

C, E. Bessey, M. S., Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany. 

A. Thomson, C. E., 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Superintendent 
of the Work-shop. 

E. E. L. Beal, B. S., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

T. E. Pope, A. M., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

M. Stalker, B. S., V. S., 

Professor of Veterinary Science. 

J. L. Budd, 

Professor of Horticulture. 

J. K. Macomber, B. S., 

Professor of Physics and Librarian. 

E. W. Stanton, B. S„ 

Professor of Mathematics and Political Economy. 

S. A. Knapp, A. M., 

Professor of Practical and Experimental Agriculture. 



8 Iowa Agricultural College. 

D. S. Fairchild, M. D., 

Professor of Histology, Pathology, and Therapeutics. 

Mrs. Mary B. Welch, Preceptress, 

Lecturer on Domestic Economy. 

J. S. Lee, B. S., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Miss Martha Sinclair, Assistant Preceptress, 

Instructor in French and English. 

J. C. HlATT, 

Superintendent of the Farm. 

T. L. Smith, B. S., 

Foreman in the Workshop and Lecturer on Architecture. 

F. W. Booth, B. S., 

Foreman and Instructor in the Printing Office and 
Assistant in Mathematics. 

C. F. Mount, B. C. E., 

Assistant in Civil Engineering. 

Winifred M. Dudley, B. S., 

Teacher of Instrumental Music. 

(I. S. Fox, 

Teacher of Vocal Music. 

Mrs. A. Thomson, 

Housekeeper and Assistant in Experimental Kitchen. 

II. I). Harlow, 

Proctor. 



JUDICIARY: 

The President; Professors Geddes, Wynn, Bessey, Thomson, 
Beal, Pope, Stalker, Budd, Macomber, Stanton, Knapp 
and mis. Welch. 



Historical. 



HISTORICAL. 



ORIGIN, AND LAWS ESTABLISHING THE 
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

The Iowa Agricultural College was formally opened on 
the 17th of March, 18G9. It will, consequently, at the close of the 
present term complete its eleventh year. 

In 1858 the Legislature of Iowa passed an act to establish an 
Agricultural College for the purpose of giving a higher 
education to the industrial classes. By the same act means were 
provided for the selection of a farm, the location of College 
buildings, and for experimentation in agriculture, hi 1859 a farm 
of six hundred and forty acres, situated in Story county, near 
Ames, was selected and purchased for the use of the College. In 
1862 a bill was passed by Congress donating public lands to the 
several states which may provide Colleges for the benefit of 
agriculture and the mechanic arts. 

The Ninth General Assembly, convened in extra session by 
proclamation of the Governor, passed an act— approved Sept. 11, 
1862 — entitled, " An act to accept the grant and carry into execution 
the trust conferred upon the State of Iowa by an act of 
Congress, entitled, " An act granting public lands to the several 
states and territories which may provide colleges for the benefit of 
agriculture and the mechanic arts, approved July 2, 1862." The 
State thereby accepted the grant upon the conditions and under 
the restrictions contained in said act of Congress, and required the 
Governor to appoint an agent to select and locate the land granted 
in said act, requiring said agent to report to the Governor and 
making it the duty of the Governor to lay a list of selections before 
the Board of Trustees of the Agricultural College at their next 
meeting for their approval, etc.; and appropriating $1,000 to carry 
out the provisions of the act.— (Acts Ex. Session, 1862, p. 25.) 



10 Towa Agricultural College. 

The act accepting the Congressional grant under the conditions 
imposed, made the College a National Institution— the state 
becoming the trustee in charge. 

In 1864 the lands/previously selected, amounting to 204,309 acres, 
were reported to the Legislature and confirmed by enactment as 
the perpetual endowment of the Agricultural College. 

At the same session of the Legislature in which this munificent 
endowment was confirmed to the Agricultural College, Governor 
Kirkwood and Senators Gue and Clarkson formed a scheme for 
realizing an immediate fund by leasing the lands instead of 
offering them for sale. This scheme was approved by the 
Legislature and passed into a law which authorizes the trustees 
to lease for a term of ten years any of the endowment lands. The 
lessee, by the terms of the act, pays annually in advance eight per 
cent interest on the appraised value of the land, with a right to 
purchase at the expiration of the lease. In the case of failure in 
the prompt payment of the interest when due, the land with all 
improvements reverts to the College. 

Annexed is the full text of the Congressional law passed 1862, 
granting lands to colleges of agriculture and the mechanic arts. 

"Beit enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
in Congress assembled, That there he granted to the several states for the purpose 
hereinafter named, an amount of the public land, to he apportioned to each state, 
a quantity equal to thirty thousand acres for each Senator and Representative in 
Congress to which the states are respectively entitled, hy the apportionment under 
the census of i860; Provided, That no mineral lands shall be selected under the 
provisions of this act. 

Sf.c. 2. And be it further enacted, That the land aforesaid, after being 
surveyed, shall be apportioned to the several states in sections or sub-divisions of 
sections not less than one-quarter of a section ; and whenever there are public 
lands in a state subject to sale at private entry at, one dollar and twenty-five cents 
per acre, the quantity to which said state shall be entitled shall be selected from 
such lands within the limits of such state, and the Secretary of the Interior is 
hereby directed to issue to each of the states in which there is not the quantity of 
public lands subject to sale at private entry at one dollar and twenty-five cents 
per acre, to which said state maybe entitled under this act, land scrip to the 

amount' in acres for the deficiency of its distributive share ; said scrip to be sold by 
said states and the proceeds thereof to be applied to the uses and purposes 
prescribed in this act, and for no ot her use or purpose whatever : Provided, that 
lO no Case Shall any State CO Which land scrip may thus be issued, be allowed to 
locate the same within the limits of any other slate, or any erritory of the United 
Slates, but their assignee may thus locate said land scrip upon any of the 

unappropriated lands of the United States subject to sale at private entry at one 

dollar and twcnty-fl ve cents Of less per acre ; and Provided further, That no more 



Historical. 11 

than one million acres shall he located by such assignee in any of the states ; 
and Provided further. That no such location shall be made before one year from 
the passage of this act 

SBC. 3. And be it further enacted, That all the expenses of management, 
superintendence, and taxes from date of selection of said lands previous to 
their sale, and all the expenses incurred in the management and disbursement of 
the moneys which may he received therefrom, shall be paid by the state to which 
they may belong, out of the treasury of said state, so that the entire proceeds of 
the sales of said lands shall be applied without any diminution whatever to the 
purposes hereinafter mentioned. 

SEC. 4. And be it further enacted, That all moneys derived from the sale of the 
lands aforesaid by the states to which the lands are apportioned, and from the 
sale of land-scrip hereinbefore provided for, shall be invested in stocks of the 
United States, or of the states, or some other safe stocks, yielding not less than five 
per centum upon the par value of said stocks ; and that the money so invested shall 
constitute a perpetual fund, the capital of which shall remain forever undiminished, 
(except so far as may be provided in section fifth of this act), and the interest of 
which shall be inviolably appropriated by each state, which may take and claim 
the benefit of this act, to the endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one 
college, where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and 
classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning 
as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the 
legislatures of the states may prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and 
practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions 
of life. 

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the grant of land and land-scrip hereby 
authorized shall be made on the following conditions, to which, as well as to the 
provisions hereinbefore contained, the previous assent of the several states shall be 
signified by legislative acts : 

First.— U any portion of the fund invested as provided by the foregoing section, 
or any portion of the interest thereon shall, by any action or contingency, be 
diminished or lost, it shall be replaced by the state to which it belongs, so that the 
capital of the fund shall remain forever undiminished, and the annual interest shall 
be regularly applied,, without diminution, to the purposes mentioned in the fourth 
section of this act ; except that a sum not exceeding ten per centum upon the 
amount received by any state under the provisions of this act, may be expended 
for the purchase of lands for sites of experimental farms, whenever authorized by 
the respective legislatures of said states. 

Second.— No portion of said fund nor the interest thereon, shall be applied 
directly or indirectly, under any pretense whatever, to the purchase, erection, 
preservation, or repair of any building or buildings. 

Third.— Any state which may take and claim the benefit of the provisions of 
this act must provide, within five years at least, not less than one college, as 
described in the fourth section of this act, or the grant to such state shall cease ; 
and said state shall he bound to pay the United States the amount received of any 
lands previously sold, and that the title to purchasers under the state shall be 
valid. 

Fourth.— An annual report shall be made regarding the progress of each 
college, recording any improvements and experiments made, with their cost and 
result, and such other matters, including state industrial and economical statistics, 
as may be supposed useful ; one copy of which shall be transmitted by mail free by 
each to all the other colleges which may be endowed under the provisions of this 
act, and also one copy^to the^Secretary of the Interior. 



12 Iowa Agricultural College. 

Fifth— When lands shall he selected from those which have heen raised to 
double the minimum price in consequence of railroad grants, they shall be 
computed to the state at the maximum price and the number of acres 
proportionately diminished. 

Sixth.— No state while in a condition of rebellion or insurrection against the 
government of the United States shall be entitled to the benefit of this act. 

Seventh.— No state shall be entitled to the benefit of this act, unless it shall 
express its acceptance thereof by its legislature within two years from the date of 
its approval by the President. 

Sec. 6. And he it further enacted, That land-scrip issued under the provisions 
of this act, shall not be subject to location until after the first day of January, 1863. 

Sec. 7. And he it further enacted. That the land officers shall receive the same 
fees for locating land-scrips issued under the provisions of this act, as is now 
allowed for the location of Military Bounty Land Warrants under existing laws : 
Provided. Their maximum compensation shall not thereby be increased. 

Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That the Governors of the several states to 
which scrip shall be issued under this act, shall be required to report annually to 
Congress all sales made of such scrip until the whole shall be disposed of, the 
amount received for the same, and what appropriation has been made of the 
proceeds— (U. S. Stat. 18G1-2, p. 503.) 

For easy reference by those who desire to gain a complete 
knowledge of this National Institution, which is under the care 
of the state, we subjoin the entire laws of the General Assembly 
relating to its organization and management taken from the code: 

COLLEGE AM) FAKM CONTROLLED BY A BOARD OF FIVE TRUSTEES. 

Section, 1604. The lands, rights, powers, and privileges, granted to and 
conferred upon the State of Iowa by the act of Congress entitled, "An act 
donating public lands to the several states and territories which may provide 
colleges tor the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts," approved July 2, 
1862, are hereby accepted by the Slate of Iowa, upon the terms, conditions, and 
restrictions contained in said act, and there is hereby established an Agricultural 
College and Model farm, to be connected with the entire agricultural and 
mechanical Interests of the state; the said college and farm to be under the 
control and management of a board of five trustees, no two of whom shall be 
elected from the same congressional district. 

THE BOARD Mow ELECTED— WHO IS INELIGIBLE. 

si-, i en:,. The present board of trustees shall continue in office until the first 
day of May, A. I). 1x74, and the General Assembly at their regular session in said 
year, shall elect three trustees to serve for four years, and two trustees to serve for 
two years from tin- fust day of May, A. I). 1K74 ; and the General Assembly at each 

regular session thereafter shall elect the number of trustees which may be 
Decenary *tO keep the board full. Any vacancies in said board caused by death, 
removal from the district or slate, resignation, or failure to qualify within, sixty 

days alter election, may be idled by appointment by the Governor ; Provided, 

Thai neither the president nor any ol her officer or employe of the college and farm, 

nor any member oi the General Assembly, shall be eligible as such trustee. 

POWERS OF the BOARD. 

Hf.c. 1806, The board of trustees shall have power: 
t To elect a chairman from their own number, a President of, the College and 



Historical. 18 

farm, a secretary, a treasurer, professors and other teachers, superintendents 
of departments, a steward, a librarian, and such other officers as may he 
required for the transaction of the business of the board ; also to fix the 
salaries of officers and prescribe their duties ; and to appoint substitutes 
who shall discharge the duties of such officers during their temporary 
absence ; 

2. To manage and control all the property of the College and farm, whether 
real or personal ; 

3. To make all rules and regulations for the government of the College and 
farm. 

4. To establish rules regulating the number of hours which shall be devoted 
to manual labor, and to fix the compensation therefor ; Provided, no 
student shall be exempt from labor except in cases of sickness or other 
infirmity, or where students from the advanced classes may be employed 
as teachers ; 

5. To arrange courses of study and practice, and to establish such professor- 
ships as they may deem best to carry into effect the provisions of this 
chapter ; also to prescribe conditions of admission to the College ; 

6. To grant diplomas, on the recommendation of the faculty, to any student 
who has completed either of the industrial courses prescribed by said 
board, or an equivalent thereof ; 

7. To remove any officer by a majority vote of all the members of the board 
of trustees ; 

8. To direct the expenditure of all appropriations which the General 
Assembly shall from time to time make to said College and farm, and the 
income arising from the Congressional grant, and from all other sources ; 

9. To keep a full and complete record of their proceedings, and to do such 
other acts as are found necessary to carry out the intent and meaning of 
this chapter. 

QUORUM. 

Sec. 1G07. A majority of the trustees shall be a quorum for the transaction of 
business. 

COMPENSATION OF BOARD. 

Sec. 1608. The trustees shall receive as their compensation four dollars a day 
for each and every day actually employed in the discharge of their duties, and five 
cents per mile for each and every mile actually traveled on such business ; 
Provided, that no member shall receive compensation for more than thirty days in 
each year. The Auditor of State is hereby authorized to audit and allow the 
claims of the board of trustees in accordance with this section. 

ANNUAL MEETINGS. 

Sec. 1609. The annual meetings of the board of trustees shall be held at the 
Agricultural College on the second Wednesday of November. 

COLLEGE YEAR, AND REPORT OF TRUSTEES TO GOVERNOR. 

Sec. Kilo. The college year shall begin on Thursday after the second 
Wednesday in November of each year, and end on the second Wednesday 
of November of the following year. The biennial report of the board 
shall be tiled in the office of the Governor, not later than the first day of 
December preceding the regular meeting of the General Assembly. The Governor 
shall cause three thousand copies of the report to be printed and bound in paper and 
distributed as follows : one thousand copies to the Agricultural College, and the 
balance to be distributed as provided by chapter ten of title two of part first of this 
code. 

PRESIDENT: HIS I'OWEK AM) DUTY. 

Sec 1611. The President of the College and farm shall control, manage, and 



14 Iowa Agricultural College. 

direct the affairs of the College and farm herein established, subject to such rule 
as may be prescribed by the board of trustees, and shall report to said board of 
trustees at their annual meeting in November, and at such other times as they 
shall direct, all his acts as such President, and the condition of the several 
departments of the College and farm, together with his recommendations for the 
future management thereof. 

SECRETARY. 

Sec. 1612. The Secretary shall keep the documents and a record of the 
proceedings of the board of trustees, and conduct their official correspondence. All 
acts of the board of trustees as to the management, disposition, or use of the lands, 
funds, or other property of the institution, shall be entered in the record of its 
proceedings, and said record.shall show how each member voted on each proposition. 
He shall also make the biennial report of the board to the General Assembly. 
Upon the election of any person to an office under said board, he shall give notice 
thereof to the Secretary of State. He shall also keep an account with the 
treasurer, charging him with all moneys paid to him from any source, and crediting 
him with the amounts paid out by him upon the order of the board of audit, which 
account shall be balanced monthly. 

BOARD OF AUDIT. 

Sec. 1613. The president and secretary shall constitute a board of audit, who 
shall, under the rules of the board of trustees, examine all bills presented for 
payment, and no bill shall be paid without their joint endorsement thereon ; 
Provided, That no bill shall be so audited for whose payment the board of trustees 
has not made appropriation ; also, the said board of audit shall examine the 
treasurer's books and vouchers monthly, and at such other times and so often as 
they shall deem necessary. All the proceedings contemplated in this section shall 
be reported by the secretary to the board of trustees at each meeting thereof. 
treasurer. 

Sec. 1614. The Treasurer shall receive and keep all notes and other evidence of 
indebtedness, contracts, and all moneys arising from the income of the Congressional 
grant, from the appropriations of the General Assembly, from the sales of the 
products of the hum, from the payments of students, and from all other sources, 
and shall pay out the same upon bills duly audited as above prescribed, and he 
shall retain such bills with the receipt for their payment as his vouchers ; but no 
bill shall be paid for which appropriation had not been made by the board of 
trustees. He Shall keep an accurate account of the revenue and expenditures of 
said College and farm from all sources, and in such manner that the receipts and 
disbursements of each and every one of the several departments thereof shall be 
apparent at all times, and the gains or losses in such departments shall be carefully 
set forth; and lie shall report to the board oi trustees at their annual meeting in 
November and at such Other times as they Shall direct. He shall also execute 

duplicate receipts of all money received by him, specifying the source from 

which received and the fund to which it belongs, one of which must be filed with 
the secretary , and no receipt lor money paid by him shall be valid unless the 
duplicate is so filed. The treasurer shall be elected annually, and give a bond 
every year in double the highest amount of money likely to be in his hands at 
any one time, wiili such sureties as the executive council shall prescribe, and 
said bond Shall be filed in, the office of Secretary of State, and the treasurer 

may appoint a deputy who shall reside at the College, and the board of trustees 
iball fix the compensation to be paid to such deputy, and the treasurer shall be 
responslbli on his official bond for all acts done by such deputy. 

OF! EOXI OF PRESIDENT and SECRETARY, ANl> OATH OK OFFICE. 
Sr.< . 1010, The president and secretary shall have their respective offices at 



Historical. IS 

the College, and they, with the treasurer, shall take and prescribe the oath provided 
in section one hundred and twenty-six, chapter nine, title two of this code. 

Till HOARD TO LEASE THE LANDS BELONGING TO THE COLLEGE. 

Substitute for Sec. 1610. The board of trustees of the Iowa State Agricultural 
College and farm are hereby authorized to lease the land granted to the State of 
Iowa by an act of Congress entitled, " An act donating public lands to the several 
states and territories, which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and 
the mechanic arts," approved July 2, 1862, in amount not exceeding one hundred 
and sixty acres to any one person, for a term not exceeding ten years, the lessee to 
pay eight per cent per annum in advance upon the price of said land, which is 
hereby declared to be not less than fifty per cent additional to the price at which 
each piece of said land, respectively, was appraised by the board of trustees in the 
year 1865 ; and the said lessee shall have the privilege of purchasing said land at 
the expiration of the lease at the price aforesaid. The lessee failing to pay the 
interest upon said lease within sixty days from the time the same becomes due, 
shall forfeit his lease, together with the interest paid thereon and the 
improvements made on said land. The said board of trustees are also authorized to 
renew leases heretofore made for a term not exceeding ten years from the date of 
such renewal, the rate of interest to be eight per cent, and when leases are so 
renewed the lands shall be subject to assessment for taxation at|the.end of ten years 
from the date of the original lease. The board of trustees shall cause to be 
certified to the auditors of the several counties in which said lands are situated, a 
list of said land which may be subject to taxation as herein provided ; Provided, 
That the re-leasing of this land shall be done by the secretary of the said College 
without extra compensation. 

MO.NEV ARISING FROM THE SALE OF LANDS TO BE PAID TO STATE TREAS- 
URER AND INVESTED BY HIM. 

Substitute for Sec. 1617. The moneys arising from the sale of said lands 
shall be paid into the state treasury, and shall be invested by the state treasurer 
subject to the approval of the executive council, in stocks of the United States, or 
of the states, or some other safe stocks yielding not less than five per centum on 
the par value of said stocks as directed by the act of Congress granting said lands, 
and the money arising from the interest on said stocks, on the deferred payments, 
and on the leases of said lands as rental thereof, shall be paid over to the board of 
trustees, and may be loaned by said board of trustees on good and sufficient 
security when not needed] to defray such expenses of the College, as said moneys 
are legally applicable to. 

BOARD TO APPOINT AGENTS WHO SHALL GIVE BONDS. 

Sec. 1618. The trustees are hereby endowed with all the necessary authority to 
appoint agents, or do any other acts necessary to carry out the provisions of the 
three preceding sections. But no such agent shall be appointed with authority to 
receive any money until he has executed a good and sufficient bond to be approved 
by the trustees in a sum double the amount he will be likely to receive. And every 
such agent shall make a monthly statement under oath to the College treasurer of 
the amount received by him, and transmit therewith all funds shown to be in his 
hands. 

FREE TUITION AND PRIOR RIGHT OF COUNTIES. 

Sec. 1619. Tuition in the College herein established shall be forever free to 
pupils from this state over sixteen years of age, who have been residents of the 
state six months previous to their admission. Each county in this state shall have 
a prior right to tuition for three scholars from such county, the remainder equal to 
the capacity of the College shall be by the trustees distributed among the counties 
in proportion to the population, subject to the above rule. Transient scholars 
otherwise qualified may at all.times receive tuition. 



10 Iowa Agricultural College. 

SALE OF LIQUORS, WINE, AND BEER PROHIBITEE. 

Sec. 1620. No person shall open, maintain, or conduct any shop or other place 
for the sale of wine, beer, or spirituous liquors, or sell the same at any place within 
a distance of three miles from the Agricultural College and farm ; Provided, That the; 
same may be sold for sacramental, mechanical, medical or culinary purposes ; and 
any person violating the provisions of this section shall be punished, on conviction by 
any court of competent jurisdiction, by a fine not exceeding fifty dollars for each 
offense, or by imprisonment in the county jail for a term not exceeding thirty days, 
or by both such fine and imprisonment. 

BRANCHES OF STUDY. 

Sec. 1621. The course of instruction and practice in said College shall include 
the following branches : natural philosophy, chemistry, botany, horticulture, fruit- 
growing, forestry, animal and vegetable anatomy, geology, mineralogy, meteorology, 
entomology, zoology, the veterinary art, plane mensuration, leveling, surveying, 
book-keeping, and such mechanic arts as are directly connected with agriculture ; 
also, such other studies as the trustees may from time to time prescribe not 
inconsistent with the purposes of this chapter. 

MONEY CANNOT BE GIVEN FROM APPROPR1 TIUN FUND. 

Sec. 1622. No money shall be diverted from the fund to which it belongs, or 
used for any other purpose than is provided by law, and any trustee, officer, or 
employe of said institution who may, by vote, direction, or act, violate the 
provisions of this section, shall be punished by fine not exceeding one thousand 
dollars, or by imprisonment in the penitentiary or county jail not less than six 
months. 



Organization, 17 



ORGANIZATION. 



Under the sanation of National law, and in harmony with 

the plan adopted at its opening, the Agricultural College lias 
developed four distinct general courses of study. These courses of 
study which the Faculty have carefully and completely revised, 
will afford the student a rare opportunity 10 gain the /'liberal 
and practical education" required by the congressional law. No 
pains have been spared to form curricula that are well balanced; 
for while the technical studies that give to each course its special 
character are fully represented, there are not wanting those 
branches that contribute to a wider culture- 

THE COURSES OF STUDY. 

1. The Course in Sciences Related to Agriculture. 

2. The Course in Mechanical Engineering. 

3. The Course in Civil Engineering. 

4. The Ladies' Course in Science. 

SPECIAL COURSES. 
For the purpose of giving some freedom of choice within the 
general courses and of meeting urgent demands outside of them, 
there have been organized three special courses : 

1. Course for Juniors and Seniors in Special Indus- 

trial Sciences. 

2. Post-graduate Courses of Study. 

3. The Preliminary Course. 

SCHOOLS. 

In order to attain a complete system the four general courses 
above mentioned, have been divided into twelve Schools, each 
embracing either a single prominent science or a small number of 
closely related sciences: 

1. School of Agriculture. 

2. School of HORTICULTURE. 



18 Iowa Agricultural College. 

3. School of Veterinary Science. 

4. School of Domestic Economy. 
.'). School of Military Science. 

6. School of Literature and Language. 

7. School of Mathematics and Physics. 

8. School of Chemistry. 

9. School of Biology. 

10. School of Philosophy. 

11. School of Mechanical Engineering and Archi- 

tecture. 

12. School of Civil Engineering. 

BUILDINGS. 

The College Building is lour stories high above the 
basement, and is 158 feet long by 112 feet deep through the wings. 
In the basement are the dining-hall, kitchen, laundry, experi- 
mental kitchen and laundry, printing office, and armory. On the 
flrsl floor are the chapel, president's office, cashier's office, and 
library. The second floor contains several recitation rooms and 

r is for students. The third and fourth floors contain student 

looms and the museum. 220 students can be accommodated in the 
building. All the rooms are heated by steam and lighted with gas. 
Water is supplied in all the stories. 

The Laboratory is a spacious two-story brick building, 

dimensions 70X44 feel, with an extension one story high, 61X33 
feet. The flrsl floor is devoted to chemistry, the second to physics, 
and two drawing rooms occupy the attic. The basement contains 
the machine shop and a large recitation room. This building is 
warmed by an independent steam-heating apparatus, and is 

supplied w il h water and gas. 

The departments of Botany and Veterinary Science are 
located in a handsome brick buildinginthe Italian style. On the first 
floor are the Botanical laboratory, led ure room, and the professor's 
room. On the second floor are found the Veterinary lecture room, 
tnu i niii, and professor's room. Behind this building is the 
Veterinarj hospital and dissecting room. 



Organization. 19 

The Horticultural Building is a neat structure containing 
on the first floor a well-furnished lecturer room, professor's room, 
and seed room. On the second tloor is the Horticultural museum. 
The cellar has two spacious rooms, one for the storage of garden 
products, the other for the use of the nursery propagating 
department. A grafting room and neat propagating structure 
arc attached heated with hot-water pipes. 

The Farm House is a substantial, plain, brick building, occupied 
by the Farm Superintendent, and accommodating several students. 
The College Creamery is a low frame building, just east of the 
farm house. The farm barns are adjacent, — one of brick, for 
horses, and one large frame barn in the basement of winch is a 
stable for one hundred head of cattle. 

The Work-shop, Laundry, and Gas-works are some distance 
behind the main building. The work-shop is a two-story frame 
building, fitted up with machinery and tools for the prosecution of 
repairs and for instruction in mechanical work. 

Professors Eudd, Thomson, Pope, and Stanton, occupy sub- 
stantial houses on or near the College grounds. The President's 
house, a fine example of the Gothic style, is now building, and is 
near the entrance to the grounds. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRANCE. 

1. The age of students seeking admission to the Agricultural 
College must be sixteen years or over. 

2. Every student on entering the College signs the following- 
con tract: 

We, the Faculty of the Iowa Agricultural College, hereby agree 
that we will guarantee to the students of 1880 all the privileges 
and instruction set forth in the Seventh Biennial Report, and that 
the laws we make shall be simply for their advancement and the 
good government of the institution. 

A. S. Welch, President. 

We, the Students, hereby agree on entering the College in 1880, 
that we will respect its laws, and, except in case of illness, unforseen 



Joiva Agricultural Colleye. 

misfortune, or the necessity of leaving to teach school, remain the 
entire term on which we enter. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS AND CERTIFICATES. 

:). Candidates for membership in the Freshman class must 
give evidence of a thorough knowledge of English Grammar, 
English Analysis, Arithmetic, and Algebra through simple 
equations. Proficiency in these studies may be proved either by 
actual examinations held at the opening of the term, or by a 
certificate given on special examinations by either the principal of 
a high school or a County Superintendent. Teacher's certificates 
will not be received. For details of Entrance Examinations see 
index. 

ADMISSION TO SPECIAL SCHOOLS. 

4. Students of the required age and preparation, may, on 
application to the President to pursue exclusively the course 
belonging to any special school; but the studies of such special 
student will be confined strictly to the school he enters. 

STUDIES PREPARATORY To ENTERING THE 
scllonL OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

~>. !JToung men who desire to take the course in Veterinary 
Science without entering t he College proper, must give evidence, 
either by examination or the certificate above mentioned, of 
proficiency in all the studies required for admission to the 
Freshman class, except Algebra. 

SUB-FRESHMAN ('LASS. 

8. For the purpose of giving a, belter preparation for the 
I n liman class to the students who come from sections of the state 
where the schools are defective, a, limited number Will receive 
Instruction in English Analysis, History, Physiology, and the 
elements of Algebra and Geometry. Students entering this class 
must, hereafter, show by examination or certificate a thorough 
knowledge of English Grammar and Arithmetic. 



Organization. 21 

HOW TO ENTER THE AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE. 

Those who desire to enter the Agricultural College at the 

opening of the spring term, March, 1880, or for the fall term which 

commences July 21, 1880, will comply with the following 

directions: 

1. Write the President, if possible before the first of February, 
asking for a card of enquiry. It will be mailed to you at once. 

2. On receiving the card of enquiry, write an answer opposite 
each question in the list; then enclose and mail it to the President. 
If the answers you give accord with the "Requirements for 
Entrance," a card of admission will he sent you. 

3. When you arrive at the opening of the term, present this 
card of admission to the Treasurer; select your room; pay the 
rent; make your deposit; and, without loss of time, show your 
receipt therefor to the President at his. office. If you have not a 
certificate of proficiency in the studies required, you will then 
secure a card of examination. 

4. Attend punctually every examination at the time and place 
indicated on the card. When all the examinations are completed 
and your standing therein marked on the card, return it to the 
President. If you have passed the studies required with a 
standing of 3 or over, 4 being perfect, ■ you will then sign the 
Student's Record Book and secure a card of classification. 

5. Present the card of classification to each of the teachers 
having charge of the classes to which you are assigned. Get your 
name enrolled on the class list and attend thereafter every 
recitation of the term. 

THE CARD OF ENQUIRY. 
The card of enquiry to be sent on application, contains the 
following questions to he answered and returned by mail: 
Questions Respecting Matters Essential to Admission. 

1. Are you sixteen years old, or older? 

2. Are you proficient in the studies required for admission to 
the Freshman class? 



22 Iowa Agricultural College. 

3. Will you, if admitted, remain one entire term, unless 
prevented by sickness or unforseen misfortune? 

Questions Not Essential to Admission. 

1. Do you intend to complete one of our courses of study? 

2. What is your father's occupation? 

:{. Do you desire to pay a limited portion of your expenses in 
work? 

GOVERNMENT. 

The crowded buildings of the Agricultural College and the 
nature of its exercises, complicated as they are by manual labor, 
make order, punctuality, and systematic effort indispensable. 
This institution can therefore offer no inducements to the idler or 
the sell-indulgent. Those, moreover, who are too independent to 
submit to needful authority, or too restless to accept wholesome 
restraint, are advised to go where the courses of study are milder 
and the requirements are consequently less. The education 
attained here is the result of energetic effort made possible by a 
uniform system of conduct and study. The following regulations 
give the institution the highest efficiency and secure to the 
student the largest possible return for time and expense. 

1. 'Idie hoUrs from seven to ten o'clock on week-day evenings, 
and Prom 7:30 a. m. to L2M.,and from l p.m. to5p. m. of all week- 
days excepl Saturday, are employed in study, recitation, and labor. 

•_'. Students must attend punctually all exercises of the classes 
to which they belong, except, in cases of illness or unavoidable 
detention. 

:;. When students have for the above reasons been absent from 

any exercise, they shad, in person, as soon as possible present their 

us lor such absence to the President, [f absent from any 

recitation they shall without delay obtain from the professor in 

charge a written recommendation for excuse for such absence, 

Which Shall be presented !<» the 1'resident for approval. Xo one is 

permitted to attend a second recitation after an unexcused absence. 

I. Students boarding and rooming in any building on the 



Organization. 23 

College Farm shall be subject to the same regulations as those 
boarding and rooming in the College building. 

:>. students boarding outside the College grounds shall, so far 
as possible, keep study hours in their rooms. In the intervals 
between recitations at the College building they shall remain in 
the chapel, keeping such order as is essential to uninterrupted 
study. Access to the rooms and halls of the sections requires 
special permission. 

(5. Examinations shall be conducted in writing, when possible, 
upon questions proposed by the instructors of the various classes, 
and no special examinations will be granted except on such days 
as the faculty may set apart for that purpose. 

7. Xo student shall graduate from this College who has not 
passed an examination and attained a standing of three (four being- 
perfect) in each of the studies of the course in which he proposes 
to graduate. Studies which are pursued for a part of a term, or a 
part of the time during any term, shall be counted porportionately 
to such part. 
PROHIBITORY LAWS FOR THE COLLEGE BUILDING. 

1. Students may not leave the vicinity of the College building 
at any time without permission from the President. General 
permission to be absent on Saturday is granted by the President. 

2. Loud talking, whistling, scuffling, gathering in halls and 
staircases, and boisterous and noisy conduct, are at all times 
forbidden. 

:;. During study hours, when not engaged in work or recitation, 
students may not leave their rooms except for unavoidable 
reasons. 

4. At 10 o'clock r. m., lights shall be extinguished, and from 
this time to the rising bell no student may be out of his room, 
except for serious reasons, nor shall he in any way disturb his 
neighbors. 

."». Students shall not deface by marking, cutting, or otherwise 
any building, walls, or furniture belonging to the College. 

6. Students shall not abstract or remove any article, whether 



24 Iowa Agricultural College' 

clothing, food, furniture, tools, fruit, flowers, or any other property 
belonging to the College. Damage, destruction, or theft of prop- 
erty, when not more than one dollar in value, will be punished by 
a hue double the amount, but when exceeding that sum the case 
will be handed over to the civil authorities. 

7. Card playing and other games of chance, cooking, and the use 
of tobacco and intoxicating beverages, in any of the rooms of the 
College buildings, are strictly forbidden. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

NTo literary, scientific, or other society shall be organized without 
the approval of the President and faculty. The existing societies, 
four in number, meet on Saturday evening and close their sessions 
at or before 10:15. Students not attending the meetings of these 
societies shall observe the order and quiet required on other 
evenings of the week. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP AND RELIGIOUS 
INSTRUCTION. 

The faculty require in and about the College building such quiet 
and decorum as are fitting to the observance of the Sabbath. 
Officers and students gather daily in the chapel for public worship. 
A Bible class, led by some older student, has its exercises on 
Sunday, al I p. m. The students' prayer meeting is held on Sunday 
evening, and on Sunday afternoon at 2:30 a discourse is given in 
the chapel l>\ the President, Professor Wynn, or a clergyman 
invited for the occasion. The object of these sermons is to 
emphasize and enforce the precepts of the Christian religion, but, 
in ;i state instil ill ion like this, it would be manifestly improper to 
teach or to controvert the tenets of sectarianism. 

STUDENTS' EXPENSES. 

i. No charge is made for tuition. 

-'• Expenses incidenl to the general management of the College 
are paid from the College interest fund. 



Organization. 25 

... For board, washing - , heating, lighting, and cleaning the 
College building, students pay what the items actually cost the 
institution. Injury to College property, of whatever sort, will be 
charged to the author, when known; otherwise to the section or 
the entire body of students. 

4. Students boarding in the College building furnish their own 
bedding, such as pillows, blankets, ticks, etc. All young men will 
be required to supply themselves witli uniforms. (See School of 
Military Science.) 

THE DINING HALL. 

5. The dining- hall will be opened on the evening preceding the 
respective days on which the spring and fall terms commence. 
Since the boarding department receives no aid from the state, and 
consequently is sustained wholly by receipts from the boarders, it 
cannot give gratuitous entertainment to any. Students and 
others bringing friends to its tables, are therefore required to pay 
for such twenty-five cents each meal. 

DEPOSIT. 

6. As security for the payment of his month's bills, each 
student, at the opening of the term, deposits with the Treasurer 
the sum of twenty dollars; and on showing the receipt therefor to 
the President and signing the record, receives his card of 
examination or classification. This deposit will be returned on 
final settlement at the close of the term. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

9. Text-books and stationery may be purchased from the 
College Treasurer at ten per cent advance on cost. Our stock is 
bought at publisher's prices. 

CARE OF MONEY. 

10. Students are advised to keep their money and other 
valuables in the College safe. While doing all in their power to 
prevent losses and punish theft, the officers will not be responsible 
for money or articles lost or stolen from the persons or rooms of 
students. 



26 Iowa Agricultural College. 

MONTHLY SETTLEMENT. 

7.' All bills tor each month must, without fail, be settled at the 
Treasurer's office on the second Saturday of the month following. 
Those who neglect this settlement cannot, without special 
permission, be permitted to remain in the College. 

s. The current expenses of students boarding in the building 
the present year are as follows. Should any changes of rates be 
made hereafter, for the year 1880, all applicants will be duly 
notified: 

Board, per week, - $2.50 

Lighting and heating, per week, - - .40 

Incidentals, per week. - .'21 

Room Kent, per term, - - $1.00 to 3.50 

Washing, average per dozen, - - - .50 

.Janitor's Fee, for students not boarding in the 

building, per term, - 5.00 

MANUAL LABOR. 

The following rules regulating manual labor have been made b* 
the Hoard of Trustees. It will be seen that no student can pa/ 
more than from a third to a half of his expenses in work. 

1. The manual labor required by law of students in the College', 
is divided into t wo kinds: viz., uninstrucfive labor, which shall be 
compensated by the payment of wages; and instructive labor 
which shall be compensated by the instruction given and the skill 
acquired. 

2. I'liinst rnct ive labor shall comprise all the operations in the 
work -shop, garden, dining-room, printing office, upon the farm and 
elsewhere, in which the work done accrues to the benefit of the 
College and not the benefll Of (he student. Instructive labor shall 
embrace all those operations in the work-shop, museum, 

laboratory, experimental kitchen, upon the farm and garden, 
in which the sole purpose of the student is the acquisition of skill 
and pracl !<•<•. 
:;. Members of the Freshman and sub-Freshman classes may 
■ •<• in un instructive labor three hours a day four days a, week, 
al the rate of from four to ben cents per hour. 



Organization. 27 

4. The members of the higher classes shall engage in instructive 
labor in the presence and under the instruction of the professor in 
charge according to the statements made in the time-table of each 
of the courses of study. 

5. Special details will be given by the president, on nomination 
by 1 leads of departments, to the most faithful and meritorious 
students of the higher classes, at the rate of pay for uninstructive 
labor. 

t>. Students of the higher classes may, at their option, engage in 
uninstructive labor at the same rate and under the same conditions 
as the Freshman class. 

7.' Students capable of acting efficiently as foremen, on 
appointment to such duty by the Superintendents, may receive 
increased pay not to exceed fourteen cents per hour. 



£8 Towa Agricultural College. 

THE COURSES OF STUDY. 



The Courses of study comprise: 

1. Tup: Course in Sciences Related to Agriculture. 

2. The Cor use in Mechanical Engineering. 

3. The Course in Civil Engineering. 

4. The Ladies' Course in Science. 

5. Course for Juniors and Seniors in Special 

Industrial Sciences. 
c». Post-graduate Courses of Study. 
7. The Preliminary Course. 

THE COURSE IN SCIENCES RELATED 
TO AGRICULTURE. 

SPECIAL FACULTY. 
The President. 
Professors Knapp, (Chairman,) Heal, 

Stalker, Stanton, 

Bessey, Wynn, 

Budd, Geddes, 

Macomber, Lei:. 

Pope, 

purpose. 
The purpose of the course in the sciences related to Agriculture, 
is to make scientists in the branches which are related to agricul- 
ture. It aims, moreover, to prepare students who desire it, for 
scientific farming. Incidentally it furnishes to all the means of 
attaining an education which is thoroughly practical. 
course of study. 
The course consists of the required antecedent studies in the 
Freshman year and the flrsl term of the Sophomore year, of the 
general branches pursued in the Sophomore, J unior, and Senior 
and of the technical studies which predominate throughout. 



Organization. k l l .) 

GRADUATION. 

The candidate for graduation in this course must have seeured'a 
standing of at least three (four being perfect) in all the studies 
(not optional) of the subjoined list, and present a final thesis as 
required by college law. 

COUESB OIE 1 STUDY. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Practical Agriculture— (2). 

Advanced Algebra— (5) fourteen weeks. 

Geometry begun— (5) four weeks. 

Book-keeping— (3). 

Rhetoric— (3), or 

Latin — (5), or 

German— (5). 

Drawing— (8). 

Composition — (1). 

SECOND TERM. 

Practical Horticulture — (2). 
Elementary Botany — (2). 
Descripti ve Zoology— (2). 
Geometry — (.">). 
„ Peabody's Moral Science— (%), or 
Latin — (5), or 
German — (5). 
Drawing — (3). 
Composition — (l). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Systematic Botany— (2). 
General Chemistry — (3). 

General Zoology— (2). 
Plane Trigonometry— (5) nine weeks. 
Land Surveying— +(5) nine weeks. 
Physics; Mechanics of Solids, Liquids, and Gases.— (2). 



3 ) Iowa Agricultural College. 

SECOND TERM. 

Horticulture— (2). 

Stock-Breeding— (1 ). 

Economic Botany — (2). 

General Chemistry — (2). 

Entomology and Vertebrate Zoology— (5). 

Physics; Light and Sound— (3). 

* Analytical Geometry — (5). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Horticulture— (1). 

Vegetable Physiology— (4) eleven weeks. 
Cryptogamic Botany — (4) seven weeks. 
Quantitative Chemistry— (2). 

Physics; Heat— (8). 

English Literature— (5). 

* Differential and Integral Calculus — (5;. 

SECOND TERM. 

Horticulture— (1). 

Landscape Gardening — (3) nine weeks. 

Farm Engineering— (3) nine weeks. 

Organic Chemistry— (2). 

Comparal ive A natomy— (4). 

Physics; Electricity, Magnetism, and Meteorology— (2). 

Political Economy— (3). 

Dissertal ions. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

I I RSI' TERM. 
A-riciill 1 1 1 ; 1 1 Chemist ry— (2). 

Veterinary Science ; Anatomy and Physiology— (3). 
Geology and Mineralogy (5). 
Psychology (5). 
lu jertations. 



• Optional to itudento who have an average standing of 3.7B in studies of die 
• i in Sophomore year. 



Organization. 31 

SECOND TERM. 

Veterinary Science; Physiology, Disease, Treatment, 

and Medicine — (4). 
Lectures on Foods — (1). 
Philosophy of Science and Sociology— (5). 
Science of Language— (5). 
Preparation of Thesis. 



THE COURSE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

SPECIAL FACULTY. 
The President. 
Professors Thomson, (Chairman) Beal, 

Stanton, Macomber, 

Lee, Miss Sinclair. 

PURPOSE. 

The object of this course is to impart the scientific knowledge 
and prctical skill which are essential to success in mechanical 
engineering. This necessarily implies a thorough mastery of the 
principles of mathematics and a diligent study of their application 
to the construction of machines. In addition to the technical 
instruction given, it aims to furnish the means for obtaining a 
liberal and practical education. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

It embraces the required antecedent studies of the first year and 
a half; also, a few general branches in the Junior and Senior years 
and the entire technical course of study and practice necessary to 
t he master workman. 

GRADUATION. 

To graduate in Mechanical Engineering requires a standing of at 
least three (four being perfect) in all the studies of the following- 
list, and the presentation of a final thesis. 



32 Iowa Agricultural College. 

GOUESE OIF 1 STTTZDY. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

FIRST TERM, 

Practical Mechanics— (2). 

Advanced Algebra— (5) fourteen weeks. 

Geometry begun — (5) four weeks. 

Book-keeping— (3). 

Rhetoric— (3), or 

German — (5), or 

Latin — (5). 

Drawing — (3;. 

Composition— (1). 

SECOND TERM. 

Practical Mechanics— (2). 
Geometry — (5). 
Elementary Botany— (2). 
Descriptive Zoology— (2). 
Peabody's Moral Science — (3), or 
Latin — (5), or 
German (5). 
Drawing — (3). 
Composition — (l). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Plane Trigonometry— (5) nine weeks. 

Land Surveying- (5) nine weeks. 

Physics; Mechanics of Solids, Liquids, and Gases— (2). 

Genera] Chemistry— (3). 

Systematic Botany— (2). 

Genera] Zoology (2). 

SECOND TERM. 

Analytical Geometry (5). 
i ,( cripl i \ e Geomel rj (2). 
Spherical Trigonomel iy d ). 
Physics; Light and Sound (3), 
Genera] Chemistry (2). 



Organization. v 33 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Principles of Mechanism— (5) twelve 1 weeks. 

Analytical Mechanics— (5) six weeks. 

Stereotomy — (2) ten weeks. 

Shades. Shadows, and Perspective — (2) eight weeks. 

Model Drawing— (2). 

Differential and Integral Calculus— (5). 

Physics; Heat— (3). 

SECOND TERM. 

Theoretical and Applied Mechanics — (5). 

Physics ; Electricity, Magnetism, and Meteorology— (2). 

Political Economy — (3). 

French— (5). 

Dissertations. 

SENIOR YEAH. 
FIRST TERM. 

Principles of Mechanism— (5). 

Theory of Motors — (5) nine weeks. 

Mechanical Drawing— (2). 

French — (5). 

Psychology— (5). 

Geology and Mineralogy — (5). 

Dissertations. 

SECOND TERM. 

Prime Movers — (ft). 

Mechanical Designing — (2). 

Philosophy of Science and Sociology — (5.). 

French — (5). 

Preparal ion of Thesis. 



'64 Joint Agricultural College. 

THE COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

SPECIAL FACULTY. 

The President. 

Professors Beal, (Chairman), Thomson, 

Stanton, Macomber, 

Lee, Miss Sinclair, 

purpose. 

It is the object of this course to educate and thoroughly train 
the student for the work of the Civil Engineer. It furnishes a 
thorough and practical course of instruction in the application of 
the mathematical and physical sciences to the profession of Civil 
Engineering. It is necessarily based upon a systematic drill in 
pure mathematics and includes in common with the other courses 
the studies necessary to a liberal education. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

The course of study embraces the antecedent studies of the first 
three terms and a limited number of general branches in the last 
two years. It comprises a full course of technical study and 
practice preparatory to Civil Engineering. 

GRADUATION. 
A standing of ;it leasl three (four being perfect) in all the studies 
of t he course, and ;i final thesis, are the conditions of graduation. 

COURSE OIE 1 STUDY. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

I lltST TERM. 

Practical Mechanics (2). 

Advanced A Igebrn (5) fourteen weeks. 

( ■'■ si 1*3 begun (5) lour weeks. 

I took keeping (;•}). 
//A ' i . or 
i <• i in" a ... or 
Latin 

< ompn ition (1). 



Organization. 35 

SECOM I> TERM. 

Practical Mechanics— (2). 
Geometry — (5). 
Elementary Botany — (2). 
Descriptive Zoology — (2). 
Peabody's Moral 8cu net — (8), or 
Latin — (5), or 
Q{ rman (5). 
Drawing— (2). 
( imposition — (] ). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Plant' Trigonometry— (5) nine weeks. 

Land Surveying— (5) nine weeks. 

Physics; Mechanics of Solids, Liquids, and Gases — (2j. 

General Chemistry— (3). 

Systematic Botany— (2). 

Genera] Zoology— (2). 

SECOND TERM. 

Analytical Geometry— (5). 
Descriptive Geometry— (2). 
Spherical Trigonometry — (1). 

Physics; Light and Sound — (3). 
General Chemistry — (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Railroad Surveying — (5) twelve weeks. 

Analytical Mechanics— (5) six weeks. 

Stereotomy— (2) ten weeks. 

Shades, shadows, and Perspective— (2) eight weeks. 

Model Drawing — (2). 

Differential and Integral Calculus— (5). 

Physics; Heat— (3). 

SECOND TERM. 

Theoretical and Applied Mechanics — (5). 
Astronomy — (2). 
Political Economy— (3). 
French— (5). 

Dissertations. 



36 Iowa Agricultural College. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Roof and Bridge structures— (5). 
Geology and Mineralogy— (5). . 
Psychology — (5). 
French— (5). 

Dissertations. 

SECOND TERM. 

Roof and Bridge Structures— (.">). 

Designing— (2;. 

Philosophy of Science and Sociology— (5). 

French - (5). 

Preparation of Thesis. 



THE LADIES' COURSE IN SCIENCE. 

SPECIAL FACULTY. 
The President. 
Mrs. Welch, (Ch'r.) 
\i iss Sinclair, Lee, 

Professors Geddes, Bessey, 

Wynn, Macomber, 

Pope, Stanton, 

purpose. 
The studies comprised in the ladies' course have been selected 
with reference simply 1<> their value, as pre-requisites to a 
t Ik»i ■hii'j.IiIn practical education, embracing a well balanced variety 
of mbjects. This course is designed to confer a culture that is at 
once solid and ;i\ ailable. 

( oi ksk OF STUDY. 

li i composed of the antecedenl studies of the first three terms. 
the in" t approved branches of science and literature in the last five 
terms, and the stud) and practice required for systematic house- 
keep! 



Organization. 87 

GRADUATION. 

A standing of at least three (four being perfect) and a final thesis 
as required by College law, are the conditions of graduation in 

this course. 

COTJESE OIF 1 STLTHDY. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Advanced Algebra — (5) fourteen weeks. 
Geometry begun— (5) four weeks. 
Book-keeping — (3). 
Rhetoric— -(3), or 
Latin— (o), or 
German— (h). 
Drawing— (3). 
Composition— (1). 

SECOND TERM. 

Elementary Botany— (2). 
Descriptive Zoology— (2). 
Geometry — (5). 

Peabody's Moral Science— -(H), or 
Latin — (5), or 
tier man — (5). 
Drawing— (3). 
Composition— (1). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
EIRST TERM. 

* Plane Trigonometry— (h) nine weeks. 

History— (2; nine weeks. 

Systematic Botany— (2). 

General Chemistry— (3). 

Domestic Economy— (2). 

General Zoology— (2). 

Physics; Mechanics of Solids* Liquids, and Gases.— /•>). 



• Optional with History and Domestic Economy to those desiring to take 
Analytical Geometry and Calculus; or the special course in Mathematics and 
Physics: 



Iowa Agricultural College. 

SECOND TERM. 

Economic Botany— (2). 

General Chemistry— i$) or 

Analytical Geometry — (5). 

Entomology and Vertebrate Zoology — (5). 

Physics; Light and Sound— (3). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Vegetable Physiology— (4) eleven weeks. 
Cryptogamie Botany— (4) seven weeks. 
Physics; Heat— (3). 
English Literature— (5). 
Quantitative Chemistry— (2) or 
Differential and Integral Calculus— (5). 

SECOND TERM. 

Domestic Economy— (1). 
Domestic Chemistry — (1). 
French -(5). 

< parative Anatomy— (4). 

Landscape Gardening — (3) or 

Physics : Eh ct ricity, Magnetism, ond Meteorology— (2). 

Political Economy— (3). 

Dissertations. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

French (3). 

(Jeologj and Mineralogy— (5). 
Psychologj (5). 
rtations. 

SECOND TERM. 

French (5). 

Philosophj of Science and Sociology (5). 

Science of Language (5). 

Preparal ion of Thesis. 



Organization. 39 

PREPARATORY COURSE. 



(FOB SUB FRFSHMEN. 



INSTRUCTORS. 

Professor Lee, Miss SINCLAIR, 

Mr. T. L. Smith. Mrs. Welch, 

Mr. C. F. Mount, Mr. F. W. Booth. 



COTTIRSIE OIE" 1 STTTZD^T. 

FIRST TERM. 

Higher Arithmetic— (5) six weeks. 
Algebra, begun — (5) ten weeks. 
English Analysis— (5). 
Physiology and Hygiene — (2). 
Drawing— (2). 

SECOND TERM., 

Algebra— (5) eight weeks. 
Geometry, begun — (5) eight weeks. 
History— (5). 

Physiology and Hygiene — (3). 
♦Descriptive Zoology — (2). 
Drawing— (2). 



*To be taken by those who have passed Physiology and Hygiene 



40 



Iowa Agricultural College. 



TIME TABLE. 
COURSE IN SCIENCES RELATED TO AGRICULTURE. 

FRESHMAN YEAR.— FIRST TERM. 



11 A. M.— 12 1 P. M.- 2 



2— 3 



Latin. 5, 

or 

German. ." 



B6ok-keeping,3. Algebra, 5. 
Algebra, 5. Book-keeping,3. 



Rhetoric, 3. 



Drawing, 2. 



^Igricmture^. 00 ^ ^ 011 ' 1 - 



Farm ami Garden work, three forenoons a week. 



SOPIIOMORK YEAR. 



Trigonometi \ 

ami 

Surveying 5. 



Botany, 2. 
Zoology, •-'. 



Physics, 2, 



Chemistry, •'> 



LahoraU>ry Practice in Chemistry, two afternoons a week. 
Field Surveying, two afternoons a week. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 



8 A.M. 9 


9 10 


10 -11 


11—12 


Calculus. .",. 


Physics, 3. 
Chemistry, 2. 


English Literature.."). Botany. 4. 

1 



Laboratory Practice * l " Chemistry, three afternoons a week. 
i In Botany, our afternoon a week. 



SENIOB YEAR, 





9 lo 


10-11 


11-12 


tgrtcultural Chem- 


\ eteriilarj 
Science, 3. 


Psychology, ."». 


..,_ .. r .. _ . 

Geology, 5. 



fi i hut) u < 'linic . two afternoons a week. 



Organization. 4i 

TIME TABLE. 
COURSE IN SCIENCES RELATED TO AGRICULTURE. 

FRESHMAN YEAR— SECOND TERM. 



11 a. M. 12 1 P. M. 2 2—3 



Latin. 5. Geometry, 5. 



Moral Science,3. Botany, 2. Drawing, 2. 

., , ,.."'',, - Descriptive Practical 

Geima,n,5. Zoology, 2. Horticulture, 2. 



Farm and Garden Work, three forenoons a week. 



SOIMIO.MORK YEAR. 



11-12 



Analytical Geom- Zoo logv, 5. I'liystcs. :;. 

et, y< Botany,*, 



Chemistry, 2. 
tock -Breeding 

Horticulture. 2. 



/ nhmatnru Prartirr. ' l " Chi mi * ir V, two afternoons a week 

Laooiauiry i racuci - ( lu ;.;„,,/,„„,.,„„ afternoon a week. 



-J I'M OK YEAR. 



11—12 



Farm and Laud- PoliticalEeonomy,3. : r ,. iniv ,.„ lt .., n 
S capeEngineering,3. ' <,mP ' U Auatomv, 4. 

Physics, 2. g Chemistry, 2. Horticulture.!. 



; • ,/,„• , j'mr.t ;,;■-. y I"- Chemistry, two afternoons a week. 
jihoiaimu i i(uiu<~ { fn Comparative Anatomy, one, afternoon a 



week. 



>i:\ioi: YEAR. 



4.-9 !) 10 10—14 



11-12 



Veterinary 

Science, 4. Philosophy of Science of 

Science, 5. Language 

Chemistry, l. 



r» U rinary Clinics, om afternoon a week; 



42 



Iowa Agricultural College. 



TIME TABLE. 
COURSE IX MECHANICAL ENGI STEERING. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. — FIEST TERM. 



11A.M. 12 


1 P. M— 2 


2—3 


3- 4 


4—5 


Latin, r>. 

or 

(Term m, 5. 


Book-keeping,3. 
Algebra, 5. 


Algebra, ■">. 
Book-keeping,3. 


Rhetoric, ;;. Drawing, 2 
Mechanics, 2. Composition] 



Shop Work, three forenoons a week. 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



8 A. M— 9 


9—10 10—11 


11—12 


1 I ■._• :; ■<;: nctl- 

and 
Surveying, 5. 


Botany, 2. 

Physics, 2. 

Zoology. 2. 


Chemistry, :s. 



Laboratory Practicein Chemistry, two afternoons a week. 
Field Surveying, two afternoons a week. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 



P \. m. 9 



Calculus. ;.. Physics, 3. 



Principles of 



Mechanism, 5 



Stereotomy, 2. 

Model Drawing. I 



Sh •/< Practice, two afternoons a week. 



IENIOE YEAR. 










10—11 


11—12 


Krench, 3. 


Principles of 
Mechai 




Psychology, 5. 


Geology, 5 





Shop Practice, three afternoons a week, 



Organiaation. 



4:\ 



TIME TABLE. 

COURSE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
FRESHMAN YEAR.— SECOND TERM. 



11 A. M.— 12 1 1'. M.— 2 


2—3 


■A— 4 


4—5 


Latin. 5. Geometry, ' r >- 


Moral Science..'?. 

or 

German, 5. 


Botany. 2. 
Zoology, 2. 


Drawing, 2. 
Mechanics, 2. 



Shop Work, three forenoons a week. 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



8 A. M — 


9-10 10—11 


11-12 


Analytical 

Geometry, 5. 




Physics, •>. 


Chemistry, 2. 
Descriptive 

Geometry, 2. 
Spherical 

Trigonometry, 1. 



ahnrntnm Pmrtirr * 7 " Chemistry, two afternoons a week. 

aomawry i racuu { I)( (f ( . omf . trira j Draivituj, two afternoons a week. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



9—10 



i'arm and Land- 



11-12 



PoliticalEconpmy,3. 



French, 5. scapeEngmeermg,3. Mechanical 

Physics, 2. .),.., , vi 



Drawing. 2. 



Theoretical and 
Applied Mechanics, 



Shop Practice, three afternoons a week. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



8 A. M. -9 



11—12 



Mine Movi 



Philosophy 



<>i' Science, 5 



Designing, 2. 



French. 



Shop Practice, five afternoons (i week. 



4i 



i Agricultural Collegi . 



TIME TABLE. 
COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. — FIRST TERM. 



11 A. M— 12 . I P. M. 



:; 4 



l.:itin. :>. B6ok-keeping,3. Algebra, 5. Rhetoric;, 3. Drawing, 2. 

or 
German, 5. Algebra, 5. Book-keeping^. Mechanics, 2. Composition, l. 



Shop Work, three forenoons a wei /.. 



soi'ii().M(n;i: YEAR. 



metrv Botany, 

;iii«l 

Surveying, '>. Zoology 



1Mi\: 



Chemistry, ::. 



Laboratory Practice in Chemistry, two afternoons a week. 
l-'n hi sun < ying, two afternoons <t week. 

JUNIOR YEAR, 



11 12 



( nlruliw, 5. 



Rallroai 



Stereotomy, 



Surveying,5. Mode] [) 1 . aw i ugi 3i 
Field Practice, /»•" afternoon* a week. 



91 Mm: YEAR, 



D in 



10 II 



11 12 



( 'i\ii tingineering, ... Psychology, 



(Jl'olrvn 



l/rawlnil, two 'Hi, riioons a weefa 



Organization. 



45 



TIME TABLE. 
COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

FRESHMAN YEAR— SECOND TERM. 



11 A. M. -12 


i 


P. M. •_» 


2 3 

Moral Science.:;. 

or 

German, 5. 


3—4 


1 5 


Latin, 5. 


G< 


ometry, 5. 


Botany, 2. 
Zoology, 2. 


Drawing, 2. 
Mechanics, 2. 



Shop Work, three forenoons a week. 



-OI'IIO.MOKK YEAR. 



Analytical 

Geometry 



Phy! 



11 — 12 

Chemistry^ 2. 
Descriptive 

Geometry, 2. 
Spherical 

Trigonometry, l. 



Lahnrataru Pru-tiee ' l " ChemUftry, two afternoons a week, 
uwojawry i unto, ( [n Descriptive Geometry, two afternoons a week. 



JTNIOR YEAR. 






French,. - ). 



PoliticalEconomy,3. Theoretical and 
Astronomy, 2. Mechanical Applied Mechanic; 

Drawing, 2. •'• 



Drafting, three afternoon* a week. 



IENIOR YEAR 



in 



( i\ il El 



'"""Science,* D»***.l 
Drafting, fixe afternoons a week. 



French 



4< i 



Iowa A <j ri<n lit ii nil College. 



TIME TABLE. 

THE LADIES' COURSE IX SCIENCE. 

FRESHMAN YEAR.— FIRST TERM. 



11 A. M.— 12 1 1". M.— 2 



3— 4 



Latin.:.. 

or 

German, 5. 



Book-keeping,3. Algebra, 5. 
Algebra, 5. Book-keeping,3. 



Rhetoric, 3. 



Drawing, 2. 
Composition, l. 



A t>: n: it 1« 03 /: in tilt fO/znOOll. 



SOIMIO.MOWK YEAR. 



8 A.M. 'i 



Trigonometry, 
or 
History, 2. 



Botany, 2. 
Zoology, •_'. 



Physics, 



Chemistry, 3. 



Laboratory Practice in Qhemistry, two afternoons a week,. 
I'lttclin in Domestic Economy, two afternoons per week.. 



•irxioi: YEAR. 



9 lo 



( ulClllllK. 5. 



Physics, :;. 
Chemistry, 2 



English Literature^. Botany, i. 



Laboratory Practtci \ '" OhemM.ry,threi afternoonsa week. 
t In Botany, one aftt moon <t week. 



SI NIOH 



8 \. M. D 



French. 3. 



in ii 



II 12 



Psychologj . 5 



Geology,, 



Organization. 



IT 



TIME TABLE. 
THE LADIES' COURSE IN SCIENCE. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. — SECOND TERM. 



li \. M.— 12 1 P.M.— 2 



■_' -3 



3-4 



4—5 



Moral Sciences 1 > (,t;ill >^- 
Latin.5. Geometry.5. or Descriptive 

merman, o. Oology, 2. 



Drawing, 



Kitchen Work in the foreiwon. 



<orilOM()liK YEAR. 



- \. M.— :i !)— 10 


10—11 


11-12 


Aualytical Geom- Z(M , lo!rv . .-, Physics ' 3 " chemistry. 2. 
ill >--'- Botany, 2. 



/ tihnmtnr}! Prnrt ,; • '" Chemistry, tiro afternoon* a in 

Laboratory i ractia ] ftj Zlinhlinh „ nr afternoon a week. 



i ' < /,. 



.ll'MOIJ YEAR. 



8 A. M. n 



9 10 



11—12 



,., 



Landscape PoliticalEconomy,3, Comparative 

K . (Jardeninj Anatomy, 4. 

ll "" "•■'• Domestic Domestic 

Pliysics,2. Economy, 1. Chemistry,!. 



Laboratory Practic( 



j in Domestic Economy, one afternoon a week. 
i In Comparative Anatomy, one afternoon a week. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



x A. M. 



11—12 



Philosophy of Science of 



Science. 5. 



anguage,5. 



French, 



48 Iowa Agricultural College. 

THE COURSE FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS IN 
SPECIAL INDUSTRIAL SCIENCES. 

For the purpose of enabling students of the Junior and Senior 

classes in the Agricultural College, to attain a high degree of pro- 
ficiency ill a branch of industrial science or art, the Faculty 
permit a choice of some single stud/and the omission of others, as 
given below. It is understood that the student will devote double 
the usual time to the stud) so chosen. 

No permission will be given to specialize in literary studies: 
neither will a student who chooses special studies be permitted to 
take any optional ones of the regular course. 

The special student in Chemistry may omit. 
Junior Year — First Term, —Botany or Physics. 

Second Term — Comparative Anatomy, or Phys- 
ics, or Landscape Engineering. 
Senior Ykai: — First Term —Geology or Veterinary Science 
Second Term— Veterinary Science or Science of 
Language. 

'1 he special studenl in Botany may omit, 
Junior Fear— First Term -Chemistry or Physics. 

Second Term— Chemistry, or Physics, or Com- 
parath e Auaiomy. 
Senior Year — hirst 'inn -Geology or Veterinary Science. 
Second Term Veterinary Science or Science of 
Language. 

The special >i udent in Z< ><u,o;, , > inaj il . 

Junior Year First Term Chemistry or Physics. 

Second Term Chemistry, or Physics and 
French. 
Senior Year FirstTerm Geology, or Veterinary Science 

and French. 
Seco ,,<l Term Veterinan Science and French. 



Organization. 49 

The special stndent in Physics may omit, 
Senior Year— First Term —Geology, or Veterinary Science 

or Agricultural Chemistry. 
Second Term — Veterinary Science or Science of 
Language. 
The special student in Agriculture may omit, 
Junior Year — First Term — Physics or English Literature. 

Second Term — Physics. 
Senior Year— First Term —Geology. 

Second Term — Science of Language. 
The special student in Horticulture may omit, 
Junior Year — First Term — Physics or English Literature. 

Second Term — Physics. 
Senior Year— First Term —Geology. 

Second Term — Science of Language. 
The special student in Geology may omit, 
Senior Year — First Term —Veterinary Science. 
Second Term — Veterinary Science. 
The special student in Mathematics and Physics may omit, 
Soph. Year — Second Term — Botany or Zoology. 
Junior Year— First Term —Chemistry or Botany. 

Second Term — Comparative Anatomy, or Chem- 
istry and Landscape Engineering. 
Senior Year — First Term —Geology, or Veterinary Science, 

or Agricultural chemistry. 
Second Term — Veterinary Science or Science of 
Language. 
The student in Architecture* may omit, 
Junior Year— First Term —Principles of Mechanism. 

Second, Term—- Mechanical Drawing. 
Senior Year— First Term —Principles ot Mechanism, Theory 

of Motors, Mechanical Drawing. 
Second Term — Prime Movers, Mechanical De- 
signing. 



See School of Mechanical Engineering and Architecture. 



,")0 Iowa Agricultural College, 



THE POST-GRADUATE COURSES OF STUDY. 

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held in December, 1876,. 
authority was given the Faculty to establish post-graduate courses 
of study and to confer upon those who should pass said courses a 
second degree. The Faculty have therefore arranged a carefully 
considered programme of post-graduate studies. All students. 
desiring to secure a second degree must pursue a course of scien- 
tific study embracing two or more subjects selected from this 
programme and approved by the Faculty. At least one year will 
be required to complete the course. (See Conditions for Conferring 
Second Degrees.) 

The following Professors will instruct and examine candidates 
for second degrees in post-graduate courses, as follows: 

President Welch 1— Psychology. 

2 — The Philosophy of Science. 
3 — Social Science. 
Professor Wynn. 4— The English Literature of the Eliza- 
bethan Period. 
5— Science of Language. 

Professor Bessey 6— Physiological Botany. 

7— Systematic Botany. 

Professor Beai 8— special Zoology. 

9— Original Designs of Engineering 
Structures. 
Professor Stalker.. .10 Veterinary Pathology and Materia 

Medica. 
1 1.— Principles of Breeding. 

PRO! ESSOR THOMSON... 12— Applied Mechanics. 

Professor Pope i:: -Agricultural and Organic Chemistry. 

PRO! ESSOR M \< OMBER..1 I Advanced Physics. 

Proi essob Stanton. ..15 Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 
Professor Budd n; Horticulture and Forestry. 



Organization. 51 



MIXED OPTIONAL COURSES AND THE 
COLLEGIATE CERTIFICATE. 

Students wlio have passed all the studies of the College courses 
up to the end of the second terra of the Sophomore year, may 
thereafter choose, in each terra, such studies of that term found in 
any of the College courses as they may desire to pursue; provided 
that previous to their classification they file with the President a 
written declaration of their intention not to seek for a diploma of 
the College; and in no case shall such student be classified in less 
than the equivalent of two full studies. 

Any person of the requisite age and preparation who may desire 
to pursue any particular line of study included in the College 
curriculum will, upon application to the President, be allowed the 
advantages of the College classes and all other facilities afforded by 
the institution. 

students having successfully pursued a course of study in the 
institution composed of studies in advance of the first term of the 
Sophomore year, but not such a course as to entitle them to gradua- 
tion will, upon application to the Faculty, be granted a certificate 
of standings in such studies. 

DISSERTATIONS IN THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR 

YEARS. 

Students in the Junior and Senior classes shall, during the first 
term of the Senior and the last term of the Junior year, write two 
dissertations each, on some topic approved by Special Faculty and 
embraced in the studies they are pursuing, and which shall be 
approved by the Professor having charge of such study. 

Such Professor shall have supervision of the entire dissertation 
so written, being the sole judge of its fitness for delivery, and shall 
report its completion to the President. 

Four such dissertations, with the final thesis, will be requisite to 
graduation. 



52 Iowa Agricultural College. 

DEGREES. 

The degree of B. S„ Bachelor of Science, is conferred upon grad- 
uates in the course in Sciences related to Agriculture. 

The degree of 13. C. E., Bachelor of Civil Engineering, is con- 
ferred upon graduates in the course in Civil Engineering. 

The degree of B. M. E., Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering, is 
conferred upon graduates in the course in Mechanical Engineering. 

The degree B. S., Bachelor of Science, is conferred upon grad- 
uates in the Ladies' Course. 

THE GRADUATING THESIS. 

Every candidate for graduation shall present an acceptable thesis 
upon some subject approved by the Special Faculty in whose 
department he proposes to graduate. 

The topic must be selected before the close of the first term of 
the Senior year, and the completed thesis must be presented to the 
special Faculty one month before Commencement day. 

Every thesis must be neatly written upon unruled paper, of a 
size designated by the Faculty; after an acceptance and formal 
reading, it shall become the property of the College, and shall be 
deposited in the Library. 

Ten dieses shall lie designated tor public reading on Commence- 
ment day, each special Faculty selecting its quota, the basis of such 
selection being \a\ the value of the thesis, [6] scholarship in the 
course of study pursued, and [e] student's good conduct during his 
ataj in College; the remaining theses shall be read before an open 
■mi of the Trustees and Faculty of the College. 

Each thesis will be in the special charge of the Professor giving 
instruction in the branch of learning upon which it treats, and 
will be responsible to the Faculty for its supervis- 
ion and correct ion. 



Organization. 53 

CONDITIONS ON WHICH HIGHER DEGREES 
ARE CONFERRED. 

These degrees are conferred upon candidates recommended by 
the Faculty, in conformity with the following rule: 

1. The degree of Master of Science is open to Bachelors of 
Science who are graduates of either the Course in Sciences related 
to Agriculture, or the Ladies' Course of this College. 

2. The degree of Civil Engineer, is open to Bachelors of Civil 
Engineering, and Bachelors of Science, previous to 1878, who are 
graduates of the Civil Engineering course of this College. 

3. The degree of Mechanical Engineer, is open to Bachelors of 
Mechanical Engineering, and Bachelors of Science previous to 1878 
who are graduates of the Mechanical Engineering course of this 
College. 

4. The degree of Master of Philosophy is open to graduates of 
either of the courses of study of this College. 

5. The Faculty will recommend for the degree of Master of 
Science, candidates otherwise qualified, who, after taking their 
Bachelor's Degrees, shall reside at the College for at least one year 
and pursue, during that time, a course of scientific study embracing 
at least two subjects selected with the approval of the Faculty 
from the programme of post-graduate studies; and shall pass a 
thorough examination upon that course, showing in one of the 
subjects special attainments, and shall present a satisfactory thesis. 

(5. The Faculty will recommend for the degree of Civil Engi- 
neer, candidates otherwise qualified, who, after taking their Bach- 
elor's degree, shall reside at the College for at least one year, and 
pursue during that time a course of study in Civil Engineering, 
and at least one additional subject, selected with the approval 
of the Faculty, from the subjoined programme of post-graduate 
studies; and shall pass a thorough examination upon that course, 
showing in one of the subjects special attainments, and shall also 
present a satisfactory thesis. 

7. The Faculty will recommend for the degree of Mechanical 
Engineer, candidates otherwise qualified, who, after taking their 



54 Iowa Agricultural College. 

Bachelor's degree, shall reside at the College for at least one year, 
and pursue during that time a course of study in Mechanical 
Engineering, and at least one additional subject, selected with the 
approval oi the Faculty, from the subjoined programme of post- 
graduate studies; and shall pass a thorough examination upon that 
course, showing in one of the subjects special attainments, and 
shall also present a satisfactory thesis. 

s. The Faculty will recommend lor the degree of Master of 
Philosophy, candidates otherwise qualified, who, after taking their 
Bachelor's degree, shall reside at the College for at least one year, 
and pursue during that time a course of study embracing at least 
two studies selected with the approval oi the Faculty, of which 
Science of Language, Psychology, Social Science, or Higher Mathe- 
matics shall constitute the principal subject; and shall pass a 
thorough examination upon that coursei showing in the principal 
subject chosen special attainments, and shall also present a 
satisfactory thesis. 

u. These degrees may be respectively conferred upon Bachelors 
of Science, Bachelors of Civil Engineering, Bachelors of Mechanical 
Engineering, graduates of this college who have not resided here 
since graduation who at a date not earlier than three years after 
graduation shall pass a thorough examination and present a thesis, 
as in case of residence. 

10. Every resident graduate must apply in writing for examin- 
ation at least six weeks previous to the annual meeting of the 
Board of Trustees, stating explicitly tin; studies in which he 
desires to be examined, and, at the time of examination, (which 
ina> he tour weeks previous to the meeting of the Hoard), he must 
present to the Faculty his final thesis. 

11. Every non-resident candidate must notify the Faculty of 
his candidature in writing, at least six months previous to the 
annual meeting of the Hoard of Trustees, stating explicitly his 
presenl qualifications, and the course of study which lie intends to 
oiler; he must, also, six weeks previous to the annual meeting of 

He' Board, applj in writing for examination, stating explicitly the 

Studies in which he desires to be examined, and at the time of 

nination, (which maybe four weeks previous to the meeting 
of the Board), he must presenl to the Faculty his final thesis. 

I-'. 'I In' Ice tor I hese degrees is five dollars. 



ScJiools. 55 



SCHOOLS. 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. 

PROF. KNAPP. 
PURPOSE. 

The purpose of this course is to furnish instruction in the 
details of farm-work, in practical processes, in farm management, 
ami such knowledge of the underlying sciences as will enable the 
student to become an intelligent agriculturist. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

The course extends over two years, and includes the practical 
instruction in Agriculture and Horticulture, with some of the 
more closely related sciences from the general college course, and 
in addition a special course of lectures designed for this class. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term.— Practical Agriculture (4), Book-keeping (3), Horti- 
culture (1), Veterinary Science ('>). 

Second Term.— Horticulture (2), Botany (2), Animal Physiology 
(2), Stock-Breeding (1), Veterinary Science (5). 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term.— Chemistry (:'»), Zoology (2), Systematic Botany (2) } 
Veterinary Science (5). 

SECOND Term.— Economic Botany (2), Chemistry (2), Entomology 
and Zoology (5), Horticulture (2). 

In addition to the class-room work, students will assist in 
conducting farm experiments, and engage in all the out-door 
operations of an instructive character. 

A certificate of attendance will be given on the completion of the 
course. 



56 Iowa Agricultural College. 



SCHOOL OF HORTICULTURE. 

PROF. BUDD. 

This school forms a part of the regular collegiate course. 
Singly and alone the time allotted to this technical line of 
study and practice could accomplish little more than to 
make the student familiar with some of the leading modes 
and methods of empirical gardening, considered mainly as 
a mere art. Supported however by the full course in the 
natural sciences, the routine of Horticultural operations rises 
above the level of unreasoning custom to the rank of applied 
science. The cultivated plant becomes a thing of life, varied in 
vitality, habit of growth, and fruitfulness by conditions of soil 
and air more or less under control. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

The course begins with the second term of the Freshman year. 
Barry's " Fruit Garden" is used as a text-book in connection with 
seasonable lectures, object lessons, and practice. In connection 
the lectures bj Prof. Bessey on Elementary Botany and Vegetable 
Physiology prove important aids. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

During the second term of this year the course of study includes 
the propagation and field management of shrubs, evergreens, 
llow (-ring plants, forestry trees, garden plaids, etc. in the study 
of Forestry, Bryant's "Forest Trees" will be used as a text- 
book. The course during this year will be supported by instruc- 
tion in Botany, Chemistry, Physics, Entomology, and Vegetable 
Biology. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

During the firsl term lectures will lie given on all the leading 
topic-, of Theorel ical Horl icull ore. As supported by the course in 
Vegetable Physiology and Cryptogenic Botany, the student will 
be enabled to comprehend vitally important principles pertaining 
to vital force, germination, root and stem growth, leaf formation 
and function, climatic adaptation, etc.; intimately associated in 
"in climate with perfect failure or varied degrees of success in 
all Hon icull ural operal ions. 



Schools. 57 

THE MEANS FOR PRACTICAL ILLUSTRATION. 

1. The Extensive Vegetable Gardens. 

2. The Extended and Varied Flower Holders. 
.:. The- Ornamental Grounds. 

4. The Extended and Varied Experimental Nurseries. 

:>. The Extensive Experimental Orchards. 

6. The Small-fruit Plantations. 

7. The Forestry Plantations. 

8. The Propagating Rooms. 

9. The Propagating Pits Under Glass. 

10. The Collection of Native and Cultivated Woods. . 

11. The Collections of Injurious and Beneficial Insects. 

12. The Sets of Abnormal and Diseased Growths. 

13. A Set of fac simile Fruit Casts. 

1-4. The Horticultural Museum now accumulating. 



SCHOOL OP VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

PROF. STALKER. 

In this course the anatomy or the horse will be the special 
object of study, but important structural differences of other 
domestic animals will be carefully noted. The lectures on anat- 
omy will be illustrated by means of plates, models, skeletons, and 
prepared specimens of all the organs. A convenient and well- 
furnished dissecting-room affords the student every facility for 
this important part of anatomical work. All dissections will be 
personally superintended by the Professor in charge, or by the 
demonstrator; and each student will be required to make a pre- 
scribed number of dissections before he can be eligible for final 
examination. The course wiii include one lecture each day during 
the Junior year. 

The study of Zoology is carried through the first year with five 
recitations per week. The first term is devoted to the principles of 
classification and the study of the true relations of the different 
branches of the animal kingdom, with a discussion of some of the 
most important physiological functions of animals. The second 
term is devoted to the more special consideration of the different 
species, paying particular attention to those having an economic 
interest. The work in the class-room is supplemented by practice 



58 Iowa Agricultural College. 

in the laboratory where the specimens are studied and identified. 
In addition to this, each student is required to make a collection 
in some branch of Zoology which he may select. 

The study of Comparative Anatomy is taken up in the second 
term of the second year, and occupies four lectures per week 
throughout the term. The subjects treated are General Biology 
and Anatomy, the anatomy of the various organisms, the evolu- 
tion of the different systems of organs, and comparative embry- 
ology. In addition to the lectures, each student spends one 
afternoon per week in the laboratory in the dissection and study 
of typical organisms. 

The course in Histology embraces, 1st —Systemic Histology . This 
section deals with the minute anatomy of the animal tissues, and 
this is taught systematically by lectures throughout the first term of 
the Senior year. 2nd, — Functional Physiology. This section refers 
to animal functions, and these are studied under the headings of (a) 
Nutrition, (6) Nervous, and (c) Reproduction. This section is 
taught in connection with the preceding, and illustrated by 
diagrams, microscopical preparations, etc. 3d, — Practical His- 
tology. This includes the practical study of the various tissues of 
the animal body by the aid of the microscope. The various meth- 
ods of preparing tissues tor microscopic examination are taught 
with the object of familiarizing the eye of the student with the 
minute anatomy of all the tissues of the animal body. The study 
is prosecuted by the student under the immediate supervision of 
the Professor. The entire course in Histology includes about 80 
lectures and six hours laboratory work per week. The facilities in 
this department are excellent. The laboratory is a large, well- 
lighted room, supplied with a large number of Histological micro- 
scopes of the most approved stands, furnished with first-class 
objectives. There are also large stands with high powers for the 
more difficull work and tor comparison. 

General Comparative Pathology, Pathological Anatomy, and His- 
tology embrace, 1st, the study ofthe Pathology, prevention, etc., of 
t lie epizoot ic and general diseases of cattle, horses, sheep, pigs, dogs, 
and other domestic animals; the natural history and peculiarities 
of parasites with the various affections to which they give rise, 
and the means to be adopted in preventing and destroying them. 
2d, Pathological Anatomy and Histology. This course is full and 
complete. Pal hological specimens of all kinds are brought before 
t he class, and Pal hological Histology is fully taught. Post-mortem 
n inations are frequentl j made in the presence of the class for 
the purpose of familiarizing I he student with the appearance of dis- 



Schools. 50 

cased tissues. The relations of Pathological Histology to the 
principles of medicine and surgerj are carefully treated of, and 
the advances made in the application of the microscope to exact 
Pathology fully considered. The use of the microscope in the 
study of Pathological specimens forms an important part of the 
Laboratory work during the last term of the Senior year. The 
course in Pathology includes about 80 lectures. 

A course of twenty lectures on Hereditj will be given during 
the first half of the fall term of the Senior year. The subjects 
treated will comprise transmissible qualities, characteristics; 
inherited traits and habits; the hereditary diseases, defects, 
mutilations, and descendible diseases, specially of horses and cat- 
tle: reversion; prepotence; in-breeding; crossing; and the produc- 
tion of races. The nature and treatment of lineal diseases will 
receive thorough attention. 

Instruction in Botany extends through one year, the student 
devoting two exercises per week to this study during that time. 
In the spring term of his first year the student acquaints himself 
with general Botany, giving his attention to the identification of 
plants, and for this purpose he joins the class in Systematic Bot- 
any in the regular College course. 

In the fall term the student takes up Economic Botany and 
Materia Medica; the origin, preparation, and properties of the 
principal medicines derived from the vegetable kingdom are dis- 
cussed and dwelt upon, and by means of carefully selected speci- 
mens the student is made thoroughly familiar with their 
appearance. 

During the year each student makes and preserves a collection 
of dried specimens of plants, and in this work he is required to 
devote particular attention to the native and cultivated plants 
which are of importance to the Veterinarian. 

The course in Chemistry embraces: 

Junior year, first term, General Chemistry. 

" second " Qualitative Analysis. 

Senior ve-.r first term { Quantitative Analysis, 
senioi year, fust teim, j p^ ysiological Chemistry. 

« « P ,m,-i « \ Quantitative Analysis, 
seconu - ( pft ysiolo g ica ) chemistry. 

General Chemistry embraces manipulating chemical apparatus, 
handling and making gases, studying the properties of different 
chemical elements and their compounds. In Qualitative Analysis 
the students receive chemicals, minerals, etc., and determine the 
elements of which they are composed. The course is very 
thorough and no student can go into the Senior year who is unabl 



60 Iowa Agricultural College. 

to analyze correctly inorganic substances. Writing chemical 
reactions and solving problems forms an important part of the 
class work. There are three recitations a week during the first 
term, two in the second, and laboratory work two afternoons a 
week dining each term. 

In the Senior year students commence by analyzing quantita- 
tively, pure chemicals, and, as soon as they have acquired sufficient 
skill, take up physiological work. This includes the detection of 
poisons; analyses of urine from healthy and diseased animals; 
examinations of food, including water; qualitative and quantita- 
tive analyses of secretions in, and excrements from, the body; 
together with such work as the clinical department may require. 
Students will also compound or make the medicines required by 
the school. During the second term original work is required, 
recitations twice a week during the year, laboratory work three 
afternoons during the first term and two in the second. A sepa- 
rate laboratory is devoted to this work. The desks are furnished 
with water, gas, and filter pumps. The required apparatus is fur- 
nished by the department and is very complete, embracing scales 
capable of weighing l-20,000th of a gramme, microscopes, combus- 
tion furnace, and miscellaneous apparatus to the amount of $3,500 
in value. 

The physiological and therapeutical value of medicines used in 
Veterinary practice, their properties, uses, and doses,' are carefully 
considered throughout the Senior year, and include about 50 
led ures. 

The course in Veterinary Medicine and Surgery embraces theo- 
retical and practical instruction in the treatment of diseases to 
which all domestic animals are subject, as well as the theory and 
practice of surgery. The lectures will be illustrated from a valua- 
ble colled ion of specimens illustrative of the morbid anatomy as 
developed by a V\ ide range of diseases. The student will have the 
benefll of assisting in a large practice, and those of the Senior class 
\\ ill '"■ made familiar with the use or instruments and the admin- 
istration of medicines. Several hundreds of animals, including 
horses, cattle, swine, and sheep, are kept on the College Farm, a 
large portion of which is breeding stock. Frequent inspection of 
these flocks and herds will afford the student most valuable oppor- 
tunities for observing sanitary conditions and gaining experience 
in obstetrical practice. The course wil] include one lecture a day 
durillgth( ear,oraboul one hundred and eighty lectures. 

A. collateral course of reading, embracing some of the best approved 
"ii llw subjects taught, will be required. 



Schools. / 61 

One half day each week will be devoted to the clinics held at 
the College hospital. The advanced students will be required to 
examine animals for certificates of soundness, diagnose diseases, 
and prescribe for the same. Hundreds of animals are presented 
at these examinations for which medical or surgical advice is 
required. The student must exercise judgment as to the course of 
treatment to be pursued in these widely differing forms of disease. 

All text-books and books of reference can be purchased at the 
< Sollege. students will have access to a large and choice library in 
which will be found all the English periodicals of value devoted to 
the interests of the Veterinarian, as well as the most valuable in 
the French and German languages. 

The course occupies two years. Sessions begin in March and 
continue till the latter part of November, with a vacation of two 
weeks in July. At the close of each term, examinations will be 
given on the subjects taught during the term. These examinations 
will be final, with the exception of the following subjects: viz., 
anatomy, materia medica, therapeutics, and veterinary medicine 
and surgery, On the last named branches the student must pass 
an examination at the end of his course. The method of examina- 
tion will largely be under the control of the Professor in charge, 
but in every ease will be such as to give ample proof as to the 
efficiency of the candidate. 

Candidates for admission must be at least sixteen years of age, 
Before entering the classes they [must pass an examination in 
reading, orthography, geography, grammar, and arithmetic. Can- 
didates for graduation must be eighteen years of age or over; must 
have completed the entire course of study, and attained a standing 
of seventy-live per cent in all the studies pursued; and finally shall 
present an acceptable thesis upon some subject approved by the 
Faculty. A graduation. fee of live dollars will be required. 

DEGREES. 

students having completed the regular two years' course of study 
and fulfilled all the requirements for graduation, will be entitled 
to the diploma of the College, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Veterinary Medicine, 1>. V. M. Students who have graduated in 
any of the courses of the Agricultural College with the degree of 
B. 8., or who may have completed an equivalent course of study in 
any well-recognized College or University, and who shall subse- 
quently complete the course of study in the School of Veterinary 
Science, will be ^entitled to the degree of Doctor of Veterinary 
Medicine, I). V. M 



62 



Iowa Agricultual College. 



SCHOOL OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

MRS. WELCH. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Second Term.— Elementary Botany and Animal Physiology. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term.— General Chemistry, Botany, Laundry Work, Plain 
Sewing, and Dress Making. 
Second Term.— General Chemistry and Botany. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term.— Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 

Second Term.— Domestic Economy by lectures, Domestic 
Chemistry, Landscape Gardening, and Practice in Cookery. 

The following is the course in Cookery. The lessons, twelve in 
number, are selected mainly from Miss Juliet Corson's Cooking-" 
School Text-Book: 



LESSON SEVEN. 

Blanquette of Veal, Pork and 
Beans, and Sponge Cake. 

LESSON EIGHT. 

Roast Beef, Apple Pie, Cream 
Meringue Pie, Baked Apples, 
Apples and Rice, and Apple Cus- 
tards. \ * 

LESSON NINE. 

Stock, Caramel, Cream C 
and Chocolate. 



ikes, 



LESSON TEN. 

Soup, Pea, Soup, 



ind 



LESSON ONE. 

Yeast, Biscuit, Milk Rolls, 
Breakfast Twist, (Jold Cake, and 
Silver Cake. 

LESSON TWO. 

Bread, Raked Macaroni, and 
Swiss Pudding with cream sauce 

LESSON THREE. 

Boiled EggS, Poached EggS, 
Plied EggS, Omelette. Paisley 
Omelette, Sweet, Omelette, and 

Apple Tails. 

LESSON FOUR. 

Chicken Curry, Ragout of Peel', 
Broiled steak, and Cassel Pud- 
ding with hard dressing. 

ii 8BOH FIVE. 

Chicken Pie, Duchesse Pota- 
. i ulienne Potatoes, Kentucky 
Potatoes, and Fruit Cake. 

LK88ON SIX, 

Broiled Mutton Chops, Mutton 
Chops S;iut('e, Vegetables gen- 
eral directions, Raked Turnips, 

llol Slaw, and Pound Cake. 

The Aral instruction in this department was given in 1872, by a 
com je of led ureH to the Junior ladies on matters connected with 



Clear 
Lemon Pie 

LESSON ELEVEN. 

Mulligatawny Soup, Roast Tur- 
key, " Angels' Food," and Tea. 

LESSON TWELVE. 

Fried Oysters, Oyster Soup 
Escalloped Oysters, and Coffee. 



Schools. 63 

housekeeping. In is77 the Trustees added a course in Cookery,, 
and provided and furnished a kitchen for the use of the class. For 
the last two years, therefore, lessons in plain cooking have been 
given to the Junior ladies, together with lectures on such topics as 
" House Furnishing," " Care of the Sick," " Management of Help," 
-Care of Children," "Dress," etc., etc. Domestic Chemistry also 
forms a part of the course in Domestic Economy. 

Our facilities were still further increased last spring by the 
addition of a laundry, wherein the ladies of the Sophomore class 
learn to wash and iron. During March and April two afternoons 
a week are spent in this laundry, under the careful supervision of 
competent teachers. During May and June lessons are given 
twice a week in plain sewing, the use of sewing-machines, and 
dress-making. From the first of* August to the last of October 
the class is instructed in Cookery. Each student is required to do 
the work explained in every lesson, so that when the course is fin- 
ished she will have cooked every article described. 



SCHOOL OF MILITARY SCIENCE. 

GENERAL GEDDES. 
FIRST YEAR. 

First Term —School of the Soldier. 
Second Term — School of the Company 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term —School of the Battalion. 
Second Term— Yield Artillery Drill. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term —Broad-Sword Exercise and Artillery Drill. 
Second Term— Small-Sword Exercise. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term —Cavalry Drill and Small-Sword Exercise. 

Lectures on Military subjects will be delived throughout the 
course. 

All male students of the' College, except such as may be excused 
by proper authority, are required to wear the prescribed uniform, 
attend all military exercises in their respective classes, and 
become members of the College Battalion. The College uniform 
is made of good serviceable cloth and is furnished at cost, the price 
not exceeding fourteen dollars. 



64 Iowa Agricultural College. 



SCHOOL OF LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE. 

PROF. WYNN AND MISS SINCLAIR 

The literary course opens with Rhetoric as a full study in the 
first term of the Freshman year. It is made optional with Latin 
and German; the Rhetoric being finished up with the first term; 
Latin and German continuing throughout the Freshman year. 
The design is. with the aid of the most competent text-book we 
can find, to require as much original work in grammatical purity, 
principles, choice and use of words, kinds of composition, etc., as 
the time of the classes will permit. Xo pains are spared to illus- 
trate the main excellencies of style in the works of the great 
masters who have written in the mother tongue, and in this way 
to make this study a fitting prepartion for English Literature which 
is to follow. 

A course in History has been planned for the the Ladies' course in 
t lie Sophomore first term. The aim here will be, instead or run- 
ning over Universal History in a dry text-book fashion, to take 
hold of some fruitful epoc in the ages, and develop it, the student 
furnishing the result of his own researches along a line of refer- 
ences indicated in the lecture-room. 

The first term of the Junior year is occupied with English 
Literature proper. It is a full study and open to all courses 
except the Mechanical and Civil Engineering. As there is but one 
term devoted to this, and it is impossible in so brief a space to 
become familiar with the whole history of the English mind, from 
the days of the Anglo-Saxon Conquest down to the present time, 
a similar method will be pursued here as in Universal History, 
—sonic specially productive era being selected, and the student 
required, under the guide of an outline furnished in the lecture- 
room, to sum up investigations of his own in the literary, social, 
and religions influences prevailing at that time and giving charac- 
ter to the great master-pieces which were then produced. At this 
of the student's progress, the library becomes his laboratory, 
and care will be taken that the necessary hooks of reference will 
he furnished to his hand. 

The literary course closes with the Science of Language in the 
id term of the Senior year. Wwe the student, keeping in the 



ScJiools. <>.") 

main close to sonic competent text-book, seeks to discover the 
underlying laws of language, making that subtle instrument, 

which is to be his means of conveying his intellectual life and 

power to his fellows, the object of his study, with the view to 
determining the origin, history, growth, decay, and ethic relations 
of all the languages on t lie fare of the earth, and settling, in so far 
as that may he done, the relation of language to thought. As lead- 
ing out to Psychology in one direction, to ethnology in another, 
and to comparative mythology in another, it is replete with inter- 
est, and has a fascination that entitles it to a crowning place in 
the course. 

LATIN. 

One year's course in Latin is provided, — a full study during the 
first and second terms of the Freshman year. The design is simply 
to meet the practical necessities of the scientific curriculum that 
prevails here. A brief preparatory drill introduces the student to 
Caesar, after reading carefully two books, he enters Virgil's 
iEneid and continues in it to the end of the year. The Boman 
pronunciation is adopted. Allen & Greenough's text-books are 
used, and the most advanced methods of imparting instruction are 
diligently sought for and practiced. 

FRENCH AND GERMAN. 

Iii the present course each of these languages is regarded as a 
means to an end, and not as an end in itself. Each is therefore 
pursued as an art rather than a science, and consequently the nat- 
ural or empirical method of instruction has a more prominent 
place than the scientific. By combining the two methods in this 
manner, better practical results are obtained than would be possi- 
ble in the same time by following either method exclusively. In 
the study of either French or German the students are expected, 
from the beginning, to use the language in the class-room as far as 
possible. 

The study of German has been introduced as optional with 
Latin and Rhetoric in the Freshman year. It is not claimed that 
anything but a rudimental knowledge of the language can be 
acquired in the allotted time, but special effort is made to render 
this knowledge practical and to make it the basis for future attain- 
ment. An energetic and persevering student gains by one year's 
through application, a knowledge of German which, though limited, 
may still be of great practical use. Otto's Conversation Grammar 
is used as a text-book during the first term. 

The course in French occupies the last three terms of the courses 



66 Iowa Agricultural College. 

in Mechanical and Civil Engineering and the Ladies' Course. The 
chief object in view in not an exhaustive and critical knowledge 
of the grammar of the language, but as high a degree of its prac- 
tical mastery as is attainable in the time. Much time is therefore 
given to reading, in order to familiarize the student with different 
styles of writing and to give facility in translating. In both 
French and German the much neglected art of understanding the 
spoken language receives particular attention. For acquiring 
the necessary knowledge of inflections and for reference, Keetel's 
Collegiate French Course is used. 



SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS. 

PROFS. STANTON AND MACOMBER. 

The course of instruction in Pure Mathematics pre-supposes a 
thorough knowledge of Arithmetic and the elementary principles 
of Algebra. It occupies three years for its completion, and 
embraces: 

Freshman Year. — First term— Algebra, Loomis' Treatise; sec- 
ond term— Plane, Solid, and Spherical Geometry, Loomis. 

Sophomore Year.— First term— Trigonometry, Chauvenet; 
second term — Analytical Geometry, Church. 

Junior Year. — First term — Differential and Integral Calculus, 
Buckingham; second term — Calculus and Philosophy ofJMathe- 
matics. 

During the Freshman year the studies of this department are 
common to all the College courses. Trigonometry is required of 
ladies desiring to pursue higher mathematics; it is* a regular 
study in the other courses. Analytical Geometry and Calculus are 
regular studies in both the Engineering courses, optional with 
Chemistry in the Ladies' course, and may be taken by such students 
in the Course in Sciences related to Agriculture as obtain an aver- 
age standing of 3.75 in the st udiesof Hie first term of the Sophomore 
year. Advanced Calculus and the Philosophy of Mathematics are 
Studied by Students in the special course in Mathematics and 
Physics. 

Algebra. In Algebra there will be two divisions. The first of 

these will be composed of students who show by their entrance 

filiations thoroughness in Arithmetic and a ready familiarity 



Schools. 67 

with tlic principles of Algebra through Equations of the First De- 
gree; the other will include all students obtaining ;i high standing 
in Arithmetic and passing the required examination in Algebra, but 
show in this latter study a want of thoroughness. Particular atten- 
tion will be given in this study to the explanation of the cardinal 
principles, and the drill in the solution of problems and equations 
will be conducted with reference to fixing these principles in the 
minds of the students. The first division will complete the subject 
in fourteen weeks; the other will devote to its study the entire term. 

Geometry. — All students securing a standing of three (four being 
perfect) in either of the divisions in Algebra will be permitted to 
enter the class in Geometry. This class will be divided into two 
divisions, corresponding to those in Algebra. The first division 
will give to the study of Plane, Solid, and Spherical Geometry the 
last lour weeks of the first, and all of the second term of the Fresh- 
man jear, while the other division will devote to the same subject 
the eighteen weeks of the second term. In this class the student 
is early taught the full meaning of a Geometrical demonstration. 
Be Is warned against the danger of learning the proposition by 
rote; and in order that he may not fall into this error, is, at the 
endjof the^first book, assigning original theorems, which he is 
required to demonstrate. He is expected not only to thoroughly 
understand each proposition, but to be able to so arrange and 
present the points of the proof as to perform a complete and per- 
fect demonstration. 

Trigonometry. — Instruction is given in this branch during the 
first nine weeks of the first term of the Sophomore year, by Pro- 
Beal. The class is thoroughly drilled in the nature and use 
of the Trigonometrical functions. 

Analytical Geo metry — This study is pursued by the Sophomore 
class during the second term. The course of instruction embraces 
Determinate and Indeterminate Geometry, including a full exam- 
ination of the Conicj-Sections. The underlying principles are 
brought prominently forward and discussed. The students are 
required tojearefully analyze each article, and solve the prob- 
lems connected therewith. To secure thoroughness frequent 
reviews are given. 

Calculus.— Instruction in Calculus is given during the spring 
term of the .Junior year. To enter this class it is necessary that 
the student should have passed the lower mathematical studies of 
the course. In no case can the study be pursued successfully with- 
out previous drill in Analytical Geometry. Buckingham's Calcu- 
lus is used as a text-book. The abstruse principles of this method 



68 Iowa Agricultural College. 

of mathematical investigation are explained upon the theory of 
rates, rather than upon the theory of infinitesimals. Instruction 
is given by daily recitations and lectures, with a review each Fri- 
day, of the week's work. Twelve weeks are devoted to Integral, 
and the remainder of the term to Differential, Calculus. 

Advanced Calculus and the Philosophy of Mathematics.— Stu- 
dents in the Special Course in Mathematics and Physics will 
continue the study of Calculus during a greater portion of the 
Junior year. A large number of problems illustrating the differ- 
ent forms into which differentials must be thrown in order to 
obtain the integrals, will be solved. The object aimed at will be 
to make the student so familiar with the principles of the science 
and the methods of procedure as to enable him to apply the com- 
plicated machinery of Calculus to practical use. In the latter 
part of the term lectures will be given on the Philosophy of 
Mathematics. 

PHYSICS. 

Students commence this study in the Sophomore year and com- 
plete it at the close of the Junior year. The study is conducted by 
means of lectures, and recitations from the text-book, illustrated 
throughout by numerous experiments. During the first term of 
the Sophomore year a course of lectures on mechanics, the mechan- 
ical powers, and the laws of motion, is given. Also, the general 
subject of the Mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases, is studied 
from the text-book. Sound and Light are studied during the 
second term. Especial attention is given to geometrical Optics 
and the theory of optical instruments. The first term of the 
Junior year is taken up in the study of Heat and Magnetism. 
Electricity and Meteorology complete the course during the last 
term. Especial attention is given to the later discoveries in Elec- 
tricity and Magnetism. Dynamo-electric machines, the electric 
light, and all the more recent discoveries and applications of 
electricity arc fully considered. The course is completed by a 
number of lectures on the recent advances in physical science, in 
which such topics as, The Conservation of Energy, The Correlation 
<>r the Physical Forces, The Theory of Machines, Relation of Vital 
to Physical Forces,and The Dissipation of Energy, are discussed. 

Libera] appropriations were early made for a Cabinet of physical 
apparatus, and as addition's are made to it every- year the depart- 
ment is tolerably well supplied with facilities for illustrating the 
more prominent subjects in Physics. Among other prominent 
pieces Of apparatus might he mentioned a huge imported Holtz 

electrical machine, with Geissler tubes and other apparatus neces- 



Schools. m 

sary for illustrating the laws of frictional electricity; a fine scien- 
tific stereopticon t'ortlie Drummond light, and a large number of 
pictures for lecture work; one of Ritchie's best air pumps; with 
the necessary apparatus for experiments on Pneumatics; Melloni's 
apparatus for radiant heat; and other instruments for studying 
mechanics, optics, and sound, too numerous to attempt a mention of 
them. The original cost of the Cabinet amounts to about four 
thousand live hundred dollars. Ganot's Physics is used as a text- 
book. 

The Physical Laboratory is supplied with gas and water in 
abundance, and is heated by steam. The lecture room has its seats 
arranged so that a class of one hundred and iifty can see the ex- 
periments to the best advantage. An advanced course which 
occupies the Senior year, is offered to students who desire it. Such 
as choose this course are required to spend from two to three after- 
noons per week in the Laboratory. They will be occupied in 
advanced work in Optics, Electricity, and Magnetism, and will 
receive lectures on the elements of physical manipulation and 
methods of research. 



SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY. 



PROFS. POPE AND LEE. 



Sophomore Year.— First term, General Chemistry ; second 
term. Qualitative Analysis. 

Junior Year. — First term, Quantitative Analysis; second term. 
Quantitative Analysis, Organic Chemistry, the Ladies' Course in 
Domestic Chemistry, Lectures on Human Foods, etc. 

Senior Year. — First term, Agricultural Chemistry; second 
term. Lectures on Foods for Domestic Animals. 

General Chemistry embraces manipulating chemical apparatus, 
handling and making gases, studying the properties of different 
chemical elements and their compounds. In Qualitative Analysis 
the students receive chemicals, minerals, etc., and determine the 
elements of which they are composed. The course is very thorough, 
and no student can go on into the Junior year who is unable to 



70 Iowa Agricultural College. 

analyze correetly inorganic substances. Writing chemical reac- 
tions and solvinpfproblems form an important part of the class 
work. Three recitations a week are held in the first term and two 
in the second— laboratory work two afternoons a week during the 
year. 

In the Junior year students commence by analyzing qualitatively, 
pure[chemicals, and as soon as they have acquired sufficient skill 
analyze paints, alloys, minerals, cast iron, water, etc. The second 
term's work in the laboratory is a continuation of the first, and 
includes also organic analyses embracing such substances as hay, 
milk, uric'acid, sugar, etc. The class work in the first term con- 
sists principally jn working out methods of analyses suitable for 
compounds whose composition is given. During the second term 
organic chemistry is studied. Three afternoons a week are required 
for, laboratory work during the first term and two during the 
second, but the laboratory is open all day and as each student has a 
separate desk he can spend as much extra time in the laboratory 
as his studies permit. The ladies' course during the first term is 
nearly the same, m the second they have one lecture a week on 
domestic chemistiy. 

In the Senior year, first term, lectures are given on agricultural 
chemistry embracing such topics as chemistry of soils and plants, 
manures, forces, etc.; second term, on foods for domestic animals. 

In the special course in chemistry, students are permitted to drop 
one]of the specified studies, (see page 48), and devote twice the usual 
t line to chemistry. 

Tin' laboratories cover a space of forty-five hundred square 
teet. have onejiuudred desks furnished with water and gas, those 
in the quantitative laboratory have filter pumps on each. The 
apparatus of this* department is valued at thirty-five hundred 
dollars and includes scales capable of weighing to one-twentieth 
of a miligramme, combustion furnace, microscope, spectroscope, etc. 

The text-books used in the Sophomore year are Cooke's Chemical 
Philosophy, Snivley's tables for .Systematic Qualitative Analysis; 
Junior year, Fresenius' Quantitative Analysis, Bloxam's Chemistry, 
Organic ami [norganic, (the organic portion alone is studied) ; Senior 
year, led ures. 



Schools. 71 



SCHOOL OF BIOLOGY. 

PROFS. BESSEY AND BEAL. 
BOTANY. 

All students in the second term of the Freshman year begin the 
study of Elementary Botany. By means of lectures twice a week, 
with illustrations from fresh specimens, the student easily masters 
all the more important facts relating to the general or gross anat- 
omy of plants. 

During the first term of the Sophomore year the students in all 
the departments pursue the study of Systematic Botany. They 
are expected to analyze and classify a sufficient number of plants 
so as to familiarize themselves with the more important orders 
and the principles of classification. Each student is required to 
prepare not less than fifty herbarium specimens, which are sub- 
mitted for examination at the end of the term. 

The higher course in Botany begins with Economic Botany in 
the second term of the Sophomore year. The origin history and 
and relationship of cultivated plants, together with a discussion 
of the value and relative importance of the timber trees of the 
world are taken up in a course of twenty-five lectures. Also the weeds 
of the farm and garden, with suggestions as to their eradication 
are discussed at some length, and the rudiments of Medical 
Botany are introduced as occasion demands. 

In the first part of the Junior year, students who take the higher 
course in Botany pursue the study of Vegetable Anatomy and 
Physiology, reciting four hours a week from the text-book, and 
spending in addition, one afternoon each week in the laboratory. 
About half the term is given to this study, and, if the student is 
faithful and earnest in his work, he cannot fail to obtain a fair 
knowledge of the structure and mode of growth and nutrition of 
plants, as understood by modern Vegetable Physiologists. 

The remaining ^portion of the term is devoted to lectures upon 
Cryptogamic Botany, in which the student is familiarized with 
the structure and principles of classification of the lower orders of 
plants. The lectures are supplemented by a course of laboratory 



72 Iowa Agricultural College. 

work, which includes an examination of typical and other impor- 
tant forms. The parasitic Fungi are studied and dwelt upon to a 
considerable extent, in accordance with the growing idea of their 
importance in Agriculture, Horticulture, and the industrial arts. 
The means of investigation throughout the course are: (1) the 
College Herbarium: (2) a collection of billets of various kinds of 
woods: (:}) a collection of grasses: (4) a collection of cones 
of evergreens; (5; a set of diagrams and charts; ((>) eleven 
compound microscopes, (with Hartnack's, Tolies', and Beck's 
objectives); (7) alcoholic and dry material for examination in the 
Botanical Laboratory: (s) students also have access to the collec- 
tions of mosses, lichens, and fungi belonging to the professor. 

ZOOLOGY. 

This course is begun in the second term of the Freshman year 
by the study of Descriptive Zoology in which are discussed the 
external form, outward relation, and geographical distribution of 
the various members of the animal kingdom. In the first term of 
the Sophomore year the general subject of Comparative Zoology is 
taken up. including the principles of classification and the true 
relations of the different parts of the animal creation, with a con- 
sideration of their more important physiological functions. The 
second term of this year is devoted to a special consideration of 
the different animals, more particularly those which possess an 
economic interest. Following this plan the greater portion of the 
term is occupied with the subject of Entomology; special attention 
being paid to those insects which have proved injurious to the 
tanner and gardener. Their life-history, as far as known, is 
examined and the various remedies and checks that have been 
found efficacious are suggested. Jn addition to the class-room 
work of this year, each student is required to collect, prepare, and 
identify a certain number of specimens from some department of 
the animal kingdom. These specimens are then deposited in the 
museum. During the last term of the year, the student spends 
one afternoon (or three hours) Of each week ill the study and 
identification of specimens in the laboratory. 

In the second term of the Junior year the study of Comparative 

Aii;itoin\ is taken up in a, course of lectures extending through 

tie- whole term. The general and special facts of Biology and 

the anatomical structure of the various organisms, are dis- 

ed with as much minuteness of detail as the time will admit, 

followed b\ ;i i(siiiiu of the subject in which the evolution of the 
different 8) stems of organs is t raced from their earliest beginnings 



Schools. 78 

to their most differentiated forms. The whole is supplemented by 
a short course upon Embryology in which the development of the 

ovum is traced and compared with (hose forms already discussed. 
During this term the student spends one afternoon in each week 

in the laboratory in the dissection and study of typical forms of 
the animal phylla. 

The library to which the students have access every day has a, 
fair supply of honks bearing upon these topics, among which are 
the following: "Harris" Insects"; Carpenter's "Comparative 
Physiology"; Owen's "Comparative Anatomy"; Gegenbaur's 
"Comparative Anatomy": Huxley's "Anatomy of the Inverte- 
brata," Darwin's "Origin of Species," "Descent of Man," and 
" Variation of Plants and Animals Under Domestication." Jordan's 
"Manual of the Vertebrates of North America" is used for 
identifying specimens. 

Ample facilities will be afforded to students who may wish 
to pursue any special line of Zoological or Anatomical research. 

The Museum occupies a large room on the third floor of the 
smith wing of the main building. It includes mounted specimens 
of a few mammals; several hundred birds (mounted), representing 
the avian fauna of the state; a large collection of reptiles, in 
alcohol; a few fishes; and a small but typical collection of inver- 
tebrates. A set of the "Ward Models," illustrating the principal 
larger fossils, and a cabinet of mineralogical specimens, are of 
service in the study of Geology. There are, besides, the following 
collections in the process of formation: A seed collection; an 
entomological cabinet; sets of the eggs and nests of birds; the 
brains of vertebrates; skulls of mammals; and skeletons of 
vertebrates. 

During the second term of the College year, the museum room is 
used ;is a laboratory, in which the students in Zoology make a 
direct study of the specimens. Tables and chairs enough to 
accommodate twenty students at once, are provided, and the room 
is open three afternoons a week for work. 

Visitors are admitted to the museum every afternoon from one 
to five o'clock. 



74 Iowa Agricultural College. 



SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY. 

PRESIDENT WELCH, PROFS. WYNN AND STANTON. 

Freshman Year.— Second term, Moral Science. 
Junior Year. — Second term, Political Economy. 
Senior Year. — First term, Psychology; second term, Philoso- 
phy of Science, Sociology, and Science of Language. 

MORAL SCIENCE. 

The Freshman class engages in the study of Moral Science, recit- 
ing three days a week' during the fall term. Peabody's Moral 
Science is used, and the subject is illustrated by abundant concrete 
examples. 

POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

Iii this division of Social Science are taught, by text-book, famil- 
iar lectures, and discussion, the laws of labor — its products and 
their cost; the principles of capital, money, foreign trade, tariff, 
taxation, and all the influences that quicken or retard exchange. 
The student thus gains a thorough acquaintance with the scientfic 
dala that underly and regulate industry. He becomes intelligent, 
moreover, in all questions of public policy respecting which 
there is such a wide diversity of opinion. 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

In the study of Psychology we aim to avoid all those questions 
which the discussion of centuries has failed to solve and which 
consequently have no bearing either on human conduct or a 
knowledge of human nature. The object sought by the student in 
this study is to gain a systematic acquaintance with the phenom- 
ena of thought, feeling, and volition; to get an insight, clear as 
may he, into the workings of his own mind, its modes of action, 
it- limits, its means and order of growth from sense to reasoning. 
\<» real progress in Psychology can be made except through the 
revelations of consciousness. The student must attain the difficult 
art of rightly scrutinizing his own mental states and modes of 
thought, six essays on topics chosen by the professor are written 
during the term by each member of the class. The facts of Psy- 
chology we maj add are made tin; basis tor the subsequent study 



ScJwoIs. 75 

of the Philosophy of Science and, together with the principles of 
Biology , are properly preparatory to Sociology. The library is well 
supplied with books of reference. 

PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE. 

This subject which occupies the Senior class the first half of The 
tail term is presented by lectures on the creation and classification 
o[ the sciences; methods of investigation, observation, experiment, 
and hypothesis; inductive and deductive reasoning; necessary 
and contingent truths; regressive reasoning illustrated by Geom- 
etry ; limits of scientific knowledge, etc. 

SOCIOLOGY. 

The remaining portion of the Senior year is given to a rapid^sur- 
vey of the fundamental principles of Sociology. This survey will 
comprise the data of the science, namely the feelings, ideas and 
wants of man, the primitive condition of the human race — its 
superstitions, erroneous beliefs, and the impulses by which savage 
tribes struggled up into civilized nations. A brief account will 
also be given of the origin and growth of government, law, science, 
religion, industry, and art. The object sought is simply to lay the 
foundation for future acquisitions. 

[For Science of Language see School of Literature and Lang- 
uage.] 



SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
AND ARCHITECTURE. 

PROFS. THOMSON AND SMITH. 

The College aims by the studies pursued in the School of Mechan- 
ical Engineering to lay a foundation of sound theory sufficiently 
comprehensive to enable its graduates to enter understandingly on 
the further investigations of the problems which may arise in the 
several departments of their professional work. It further aims 
to teach the student such skill and dexterity in the use of tools 
and machinery as to enable him not only to properly design, but 



Tti Towa Agricultural College. 

also if necessary to construct, any machinery which the develop- 
ment of the mechanic aits may require; shop-practice is therefore 
included in the course. The workshop is fitted up with vises, tools, 
and machinery for the purpose of enabling the teacher to give 
instruction according to the most approved methods of modern 
practice. This work is carried through the Freshman and Junior 
years, and may be pursued in the Senior year in connection with 
designing and drawing. The leading studies are as follows: 

Geometrical and Projection Drawing \ — This is carried on with 
and is subservient to the work done in the shops. 

Descriptive Geometry . — This subject is taught by the Professor 
of Civil Engineering, for which see Civil Engineering. 

Principles of Mechanism. — Treats of mechanism in general; 
rolling contact : sliding contact; wrapping connectors; trains of 
elementary combinations; general principles of aggregate velocity; 
combinations for producing aggregate paths or motion in space; 
adjustments; properties of friction; butting friction; twisting- 
friction; friction wheels ; coil friction ; universal joints. 

Analytical Mechanics. — This subject is taught by the use of text- 
book and lectures, and embraces all the subjects which are deemed 
appropriate and profitable to the student in the Civil and Mechan- 
ical Engineering courses. 

A'* sistan.ee of Materials. — This embraces experimental work, and 
results found by other experimenters, from which are deduced the 
laws ami coefficients of elasticity ; work of elongation, and time of 
oscillation; set, viscosity, modulus of strength; safe limits of 
loading; tension and compression; strength of columns; shocks; 
crystallization and practical formulas. 

Prime Movers. — The indicator as applied to the steam engine; 
tlir us.- of brakes and dynamometers; to proportion fly-wheels so 
that their velocity shall deviate from a mean velocity by a given 
amount; measurement of a source of water power; water power 
engines; water pressure engines; impulse of water on vanes; 
turbine water wheels ; combustion of fuel, efficiency of furnace; 
principles of thermo-dynamics ; air engines; steam engines; fur- 
naces and boilers. The student is also required to take indicator 
diagrams, and from them calculate the power of engines with 
Bteam working ai different degrees of expansion, the diagrams 
being taken from different engines. 

Machint Drawing. Complete working and detailed drawings 
lor use in i In- shops; drawings of original designs, finished in 

wider colors and b\ line shading; designs and estimates for 
machinery. 



Schools. . 77 

ARCHITECTURE. 

Architecture is now a branch of the School of Mechanical Engi- 
aeering and is intended to be supplementary to the instruction 
given in architects' offices. It aims to supply a thorough knowledge 
of the history of the art, of building processes and materials, of 
scientific construction, and of composition and design. The tech- 
nical studies begin with the first term of the Junior year, and are 
comprised under the following heads: 

Eleur nts of Architect are. — The five orders and their applications ; 
arches; vaults: roofs; domes; spires; doors and windows; stairs. 

History of Architecture. — The general history of Greece and of 
(Jreek art: Roman history and art; mediaeval and modern history 
and art. 

Scientific Construction.— Foundations, brick-work, stone-work; 
theory of the arch; strength of pillars and walls. 

Specifications and Working Drawings. — Masonry; carpentry ; 
plumbing; iron- work and ventilation; details and dimensions; 
estimates. 

Theory of Architecture. — Ornamentation etc. 

Drawing and Design. — Free-hand drawing; tinting; solution of 
architectural problems: original design. 

Books of Reference.— Fergusson's History of Architecture, Tred- 
gold's Carpentry, Jones' Grammar of Ornament, Viollet le Due's 
Disc >urses on Architecture, Gwilt's Encyclopedia of Architecture. 

In connection with this course of study the same amount of 
shop-practice will be required as in the Mechanical Engineering 
course, and will include the use of tools and wood-working 
machinery, the construction of problems in stair-building and 
joinery, and such other work as may arise in the repairing and 
construction of buildings on the grounds. 



7^ Iowa Agricultural College. 

SCHOOL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

PROF. BEAT,. 

The basis of this course of study is laid by a systematic drill in 
Algebra and Geometry during- the Freshman year. In the Sopho- 
more year, first term, Plane Trigonometry and Land Surveying are 
taught in the class room, and the latter is supplemented by work 
in the field where the student becomes acquainted with all the man- 
ual portions of the business, and acquires proficiency in the use of 
the chain, compass, transit, and other instruments. Notes are kept 
of the data taken as in actual work and Prom these the areas are 
calculated and the fields platted. In the second term Descriptive 
Geometry, Spherical Trigonometry, and Analytical Geometry are 
begun and the latter finished, having five recitations per week 
during the whole term. In the former, two recitations or lectures 
arc given, in addition to which the student prepares twenty 
plates of drawings, each consisting of some special graphical prob- 
lem which involves one or more of the general problems of 
Descriptive Geometry. By this means Mechanical Drawing is 
practiced at the same time that its underlying science is studied. 
Spherical Trigonometry occupies one exercise per week throughout 
the whole term. 

[n the .Junior year the course becomes more strictly technical. 
During the first term the various met hods of laying out railway 
carves, putting in switches and side-tracks, and setting slope- 
stakes, are taught together with the principles of the construction 
of water works, sewers, retaining wails, and other combined 
structures. As nearly as possible all the problems investigated in 
the class-room are taken into the field and staked out upon the 
ground. Data are also taken for problems in earth work, both 
excavation and embankment, and the cubic contents calculated. 
In pure mathematics, Calculus is taught during the term, there 
being five recitations per week. Descriptive Geometry is contin- 
ued in much the same manner as before, only dealing with the 
•i- problems of Stereotomy, Shades, Shadows and Perspective, 
and I iomel lie. About t went \ plates of drawings are prepared. 

In tin- second lei in Analytical Mechanics and the Strength of 
Materials occupy five recital ions per week. During this term, also, 
a practice Blirvej of a portion of a, line of railway is undertaken, 



Schools. 7i> 

and the engineering of the work carried as far as is possible with- 
out the actual construction. The line is run, the curves put in, the 
profile taken, the grades determined upon, and it is then cross-sec- 
tioned and left ready for the contractor. The notes of the work 
arc kept exactly as in actual practice, and from them a profile and 
plan arc drawn, including, also, the more important topographical 
features of the adjoining lands. 

A course in Astronomy is included in the department in this 
term. It is partly descriptive and partly mathematical, extending 
as far in the latter as the determination of latitudes and longitudes 
and the laying out of a true north and south line by observing the 
meridian transit of a star. 

Dining theSenior year the student devotes himself to the higher 
problems of Engineering, such as the strength and stability of 
arches and suspension bridges, the construction of bridge and roof 
trusses and girders, and the laying of foundations. A portion of 
this year also is given to the designing of structures and calcula- 
tions of their strength, with detailed drawings of the same: in a 
word, the office-work of a constructing engineer. 

The department is well-furnished with field instruments, con- 
sisting of two transits, two levels, one compass, chains, tapes, rods, 
poles, etc. The text-books used are Gillespie's Land Surveying, 
Ilenck's Field Book for Engineers, Wood on Roof and Bridge 
Trusses, Stoney on Strains, Allen on Dock Walls; while many 
others of a similar character are kept in the library for reference. 



8 I Iowa Agricultural College 



INDEX, 



OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 5-8 

Board of Trustees— Officers of the Board— Officers of Instruction. 

HISTORICAI 9-16 

Origin ami Laws. 

ORGANIZATION 17-27 

The Courses of Study— Buildings— Requirements for Entrance— 
How to Enter the Agricultural College— Government: — Literary 
Societies Public Worship and Religious Instruction— Students' 
Expenses Manual Labor. 

THE COURSES OF STUDY 28-54 

The Course in Agriculture, in Mechanical Engineering, in Civil 
Engineering, the Ladies" Course, the Preparatory Course— Time 
Tallies -special Courses Post-Graduate Courses— Dissertations 
Degrees Graduating Thesis— Higher Degrees. 

SCHOOLS 55-79 

School of Agriculture School of Borti culture— School of Veter- 
inary Science School of Domestic Economy School of Military 
Science School of Literature and Language School of Mathe- 
matics and Physics School ol. Chemistry School of Biology— 
School of Philosophy School of Mechanical Engineering and 
Architecture School of Civil Engineering. 



mm 

MmiiiiiT¥ if tiiiami 



THE IOWA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

THE ANNUAL 

CATALOGUE 

FOR THE YEAR 
1881. 



r 



/ 



Iowa Agricultural College. 



CATALOGUE 



FOR TIIK YEAR 



1881 



SCIENCE WITH PRACTICE. 



1881. 
BY THE COLLEGE. 

AMES. 



AMES, IOWA: 

THE INTELLIGENCER STEAM PRINTING HOUSE. 

1881. 



Iowa Agricultural Gollegt . 
CALENDAR FOR 1881-82. 

1881. 



Tenn Examinations. - November 2 to U 

Address before the Literary Societies. 



\ Monday, 7: 20 i'. M.. 
/ November 7. 



Address before the Trustees. j ^^^'^emb^r 8. 

Commencement Exercises, - - [ WedneB ^^& r 3 9] 

Winter Vacation 
From November 10, 1881, to March i, 1882, 



1882. 
Term opens ______ Wednesday. March 1. 

Entrance Examination, - - - {2__^'__5,i 
Recitations begin ______ Friday, March 3. 

Term Examinations, - - Jane 22, to June 28 



( Wednesday. 7:30 p.m., 

I June 28. 



Junior Exhibition, - - 

Summer Recess begins - Thursday. June _!). 

Second Term begins _____ Tuesday, July 18. 

Entrance Examinations, j ^* ,,, J jnfy V», 

Recitations begin - - - Wednesday, July li). 

Term Examinations, - Nov. 1. to Nov. 8. 

Address before the Literary Societies, j M,,n,lj '. v - ^ e ^^ 6 

Address before the Trustees. j T ™* d W ^Ar 7. 

( 'ommencement Exercises. J ^^^fcVember 8< 

Winter Vacation 
From November 9, 1882, to March l, 1883. 



4 Iowa Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Hon. H. G. LITTLE, Grinnell. - 1882. 

Hon. WILLIAM McCLIJSTTOCK, West Union, - , 1882. 

Elon. JOHN N. DIXON, Oskaloosa, - - 1882. 

Hon. G. II. WRIGHT. Sioux City, ----- 1884. 

Hon. C. W. TEXXEY. Plymouth. - - • - 1884. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD, 
II. G. Little. Grinnell, Chairman. 

E. W. Stanton, Ames. Secretary. 

Wm. D. Lucas, Ames. Treasurer. 

J. L. Geddes, Ames. Deputy Treasurer and Steward. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Executive and Finance Committee— Trustees Wright, McClintock, 
and Tenney. 

Committee on Vacuity and Courses of Study — Trustees Tenney, 
Dixon, and Little, and President Welch. 

Committee on Farm and Farm Buildings— Trustees Dixon. Ten- 
ney, and Little. 

Commit/" on Horticulture— Trustees Dixon, Wright, and 
McClintock. 

Committee on Workshop —Trustees Tenney, McClintock, and 
Dixon. 

Commi'teeon Forfeited Lands— Trustees Wright and Tenney. 
Building Committee Trustees Wright, Dixon, and Little. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held on the see- 
ond Wednesday in November; the other meetings are held in the 
latter part of November and in May, 



Imr.i . [yricultitral < '"//» </< 
OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION. 



A. s. WELCH. LL. 1).. President, 

Professor of Psychology and Sociology. 



GEN. J. L. GEDDES, M. Ph., Vice-President 

Professor of Military Tactics ami Engineering*. 



W. II. WVNX. A. M., Ph.D., 
Professor of English Literature, and Science of Language 



C. E. BESSEY. M. 8c. Ph. I).. 
Professor of Botany. 



A. THOMSON, C. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Superintendent of Workshop. 



F. E. L. BEAL, B. Sc., 
Professor of Civil Engineering, and acting Professor of Zoology. 



T. E. POPE, A. M., 

Professor of Chemistry. 



M. STALKER. B. Sc, V. S. 

Pro lessor of Veterinary Science. 



J. L. BUM). M. II., 

Professor of Horticulture. 



J. K. MACOMBER, B. Sc, 

Professor of Physics, and Librarian. 



Towei 4 [gricuttural ( 'otlege. 



E. W. STANTON, B. Sc, 

Professor of Mathematics and Political Economy 



S. A. KNAPP, LL. I).. 
Professor of Practical and Experimental Agriculture 

I). S. FAIRCHILD, M. I)., 
Professor of Pathology, Histology, and Therapeutics 



MRS. MARY B. WELCH, 
Lecturer on Domestic Economy. 



MARTHA SINCLAIR, Preceptress, 

Instructor in English, French, and German. 

C. E. MOUNT, C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 



HERBERT OSBORN, M. Sc. 

Assistant in Zoology and Entomology. 

FREMONT TURNER. P>. M. E.. 
Foreman and Teacher in the Workshop. 

E. I). HARVEY, B. Sc. 

Assistant in the Chemical Laboratory. 

J. C. IIAINER, B. Sc, 

instructor in Mathematics and Book-keeping, 

GEO. C. FAVILLE, B. Sc, 1). V. M. 

Assistant in Veterinary Medicine. 

lrmixa athearn, 

Teacher of Instrumental and Vocal Music. 



II. I). HARLOW 



Iowa Agricultural < 'ollegi . 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 



Graduates of 1872. 



J. 0. Arthur, B. Sc.. M. Sc 
P. s. Brown, B. Sc. 

0. Cessna, B. Sc. 
*S.A. Churchill, B. Sc, 
S. II. Dickey, B. Sc. 
ChaslDietz, B. Sc, 
L. Foster, B. Sc, 
B. Fuller, B. Sc, , 
F. L. Harvey, B. Sc, 
*F. M. Hungerford, B. Sc, 
Mattie E. [Locke] Macoml)er,B 

J. K. Macomber, B. Sc 
L. W. Noyes, B. Sc. 
IT. L. Page, B. Sc 
Gr. W.Ramsey ,B.Sc,(M.P.) 
Fannie H. [Richards] Stanley, B. Sc, 

Dubuque, 
*C.A. Smith, B. Sc. 

1. W. Smith, B. Sc (M. 
II. C. Spencer, B. Sc, 

B. W. Stanton, B. Sc. 
J. L.Stevens, B. Sc 

C. L. Suksdorf, B. Sc, 
*T. L. Thompson. B. S< 
C. H. Tillotson, B. Sc, 
*C. P. Wellman, B. Sc 
J. M.Wells, B. Sc, 



Charles City, 


Iowa. 


Fayette. 


Iowa. 


Chicago, 


Illinois. 


Los Angeles. 


California. 


Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Ottumwa. 


Iowa. 


Fayette ville, 


Arkansas. 


er,B. Sc, 




Ames. 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Chicago, 


Illinois. " 


Boone, 


Iowa. 


Magnolia. 


Illinois. 



Iowa. 



D.jCharles City, 


Iowa. 


Grinnell, 


Iowa.. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Mt. Adams. 


Washington Ter. 


Ames. 


Iowa. 


Nevada. 


Iowa.— Total 20, 



toaoa AgricitlUiral < 'oUege, 



Graduates of 1873. 

F. L. Heard. 15. Sc. Chester, Iowa. 

Rowena E. | Edson] Stevens, B. Sc. 

Ames. Iowa. 
Hi. H, Flower, li. Sc. 

W. (riven. 1>. Sc. Davenport, Iowa, 

(i. \\\ Harvey. 13. Sc. (Ph. ('.. M. I).). 

Strawn. Illinois. 

A. M. Hawkins. B. Sc. Xyeeo. Arizona. 

1). A. Kent. B. Sc Polk City. Iowa. 

Kate [Krater] Star, B. Sc., Algona, Iowa. 

J. S. Lee. B. Sc. Des Moines. Iowa. 

C. I>. Maben, B. Sc. Garner, Iowa. 

M. F. Marshall, B. Sc. Knoxville, Iowa. 
[I at tie E. [Raybourne] Morse, B. Sc. 

Denver, Colorado. 

W. O. Robinson, B, Sc. Bloomington, Nebraska. 

M. Stalker B. Sc. i V. S..1 Ames. Iowa. 

Sally [Stalker]Smith,B. Sc, Charles City, [owa- Total 



15. 



Graduates of 1874. 

Fstella J. Bebout; B. Sc, Des Moines, 
C.I).Boardman,H.Sc( M.I). iOdebolt. 
C. S. Chase. B. Sc. Shenandoah, 

c. E.Clingan,B.Sc.,(M.D.), Sioux City, 
E.R.ClinganJB.Sc ,(LL.B.), Ft. Benton. 



C. P. Hastings, B. Sc. 

•J. (,. W. Kiesel. B. Sc. 
M. C. Litteer. B. Sc, 
C. E. Marsh. B. Sc. 
(). P. MeCray. B. Sc, 
Man A. [Palmerl Snell, B. 

A. A. Parsons. B. Sc. 
Eva F. [Paull] Vansiyke 



San Francisco 
Dubuque. 
Conway, 
Cresco, 
Des Moines. 
Sc. 
Boonsboro, 

15. Sc, 
Dubuque. 
Vinton. 



E. A. Pync B. Sc, 
Ida F. [Smith ].\oyes. B.Sc, Chicago, 
W . K. Smith. I>. Sc Davenport. 

Kate \. Tupper, B. Sc. Applelon. 

J. li. Whittaker, B. Sc, Boone, 

S. Y. Yates. II. Sc. Tipton. 



Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa 

Montana. 

California. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

New 1 York. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

Iowa. 

Wisconsin. 

Iowa. 

Iowa.— Total 19. 



Inini Agricultural ( 'ollegi 



Graduates of 1875. 

E.P.Cadwell,B.Sc.,(LL. 15. i Logan, 
Millah M. [Cherrie] Whiting. B. Sc, 

Cedar Rapids. 
Alice [Cunningham] Culver, B. Sc. 

Knoxville. 
Lizzie M. [Curtis] Foster, B. Sc, 

Monticello, 
It P. Kelley. B. Sc, (LL. 15.). 
('. II. Lee. B. Sc. Des Moines. 

W. R. Lamoreanx, 15. Sc, Ft. Dodge, 
Hannah P. [Lyman] Cadwell, B. Sc. 

Logan, 
F. -I. Macomber, B. Sc.iLL. B.), 

Lewis. 
(Vlestia A. [Xeal| Gerhart, B. Sc. 

Astoria. 
T. L. Talnier. B. Sc. Carroll City. 

II. R. Patrick, B. Sc. San Diego, 

C. E. Peterson. B. Sc. Panora. 

Ida M. [Ross] Boardman,B.Sc, 

Odebolt. 
M. E. Rudolph. I5.Sc.LL. B.), 

Canton. 
Ida L. Sherman. 15. Sc. Fredericksburg. 
L. C. Thornton. B. Sc, Kansas City, 
j; M. Whittaker, B. Sc, Marshall, 
Nancy Wills. B. Sc. Boone. 

Lizzie M. [Wilson] Edwards, B.Sc. 

Traer. 



Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 
Kansas. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Oregon. 
Iowa. 
( California. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Dakota. 

Iowa. 

Missouri. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa.— Total 20. 



Graduates of 1876. 

M. I. Aitken. B. Sc Cincinnati. Ohio. 

A. P. Barker, B. Sc.. Camanche. Iowa. 

L. M. Beard, 11 Sc. Decorah. Iowa. 

A. M. Blodget, B. Sc. Kansas City, Missouri. 

Julia C. [Blodget] Hainer, B. Sc. 

Aurora. Nebraska. 
L. A. Claussen. 15. Sc, (M. D.). 

Beatrice. Nebraska. 

J.E. Cobbey. B. Sc., LL.B.).Beatrice, Xebraska. 

W. S. Collins. B. Sc. Springfield. Illinois. 



10 



Iowa Agricultural College 



Winnifred M. [Dudley] Shaw, B. Sc., 



Corning, 


Iowa. ' 


•J. J. Fegtly, B. Sc. Keosauqua, 


Iowa. 


(r. A. Garard, B. Sc, (LL. B.), 




Eldora, 


Iowa. 


W. F. Gilmore. 13. Sc. Tipton, 


Iowa. 


J.F.Hardin, B.Sc. (LL. B.)Eldora. 


Iowa. 


Ellen'W. Harlow, B. Sc. Ames 


Iowa. 


A. E. Hitchcock. P. Sc. (LL. B.), 




Mitchell, 


Dakota. 


W. M. James. B. Sc. El Paso. 


Texas. 


EllaF. Mead, B. Sc. Cresco, 


Iowa. 


II. M. Scott, B, Sc. Mapleton. 


Iowa. 


A. B. Shaw. P. Sc. Corning, 


Iowa. 


L. E. Spencer. B. Sc, (LL. B.), 




Grinnell, 


Iowa. 


W. M. Woodward. B. Sc, Ptica, 


IIP— TOTAI 


Graduates of 1877. 




F. W. Booth, B. Sc. Council Bluffs. 


Iowa. 


Alt'aretta J.Campbell, B.Se.Cedar Rapids, 


Iowa. 


Mary C. [Carpenter] Hardin. B. Sc, 




Eldora, 


Iowa. 


C. C. Colclo, P>. Sc., Carroll City, 


Towa. 


Kate S. Curtis. B. Sc. Monticello, 


Towa. 


J. W. Doxsee, B. Sc, Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Mary E. Farwell, B. Sc, Monticello, 


Iowa. 


A. P. Hargrave, P>. Sc. Columbus Junction 


. Iowa. 


W.A.Helsell,B.Sc.,(LL.B.)Odebolt, 


Towa. 


J. B. Hungerford, B. Sc, Morning Sun, 


Iowa. 


W. X. Hunt, B. Sc, Nevada, 


Iowa. 


R. F. Jordan, B. Sc. (LL. P.), 




Boone, 


Iowa. 


Cora B. Keith, B. Sc. Vinton, 


Towa. 


E. L. King, B. Sc, Osceolo, 


Nebraska. 


G. I. Miller, P. Sc, Audubon. 


Iowa. 


Alice |Neal| Gregg, B. Sc, Traer, 


Iowa. 


J. C. Millies. P.ScjY.S.i, Cedar Rapids, 


Towa. 


Cora M. Path B. Sc. Redfield, 


Iowa. 


P. B. Robinson, P. Sc. Big Grove ^ 


[owa. 


'1'. L. Smith, P. Sc. Wausau. 


Wis. 


P. P. Stratton, P. Sc, Gifford, 


Iowa. 


II. M. White P. Sc. (PP. P.), 




Davenport, 


Iowa.— Tot, 



ax 22. 



Towa Agricultural College. 



n 



Graduates of 1878. 



Flora E. Brown, \\. Sc, 

R. Burke, B. Sc, 

A..E. Griffith ,B.Sc, M. Ph., 

II. L. Glenn, I?. Sc, 

J. C. Bainer, B. Sc. 

M.M.Hitchcock,]). C.E., 

('. B. .Martin. 13. C. E., 

.!. ('. Meredith, B. M. E., 

Emma McHenry, B. Sc, 

I). McKinnon, B. Sc, 

J. X. Muncy, B. Sc, 

C. E. Mount, B. C. E.,C. E 

Ellen Bice, B. Sc. 

\V. K. Bobbins, B. Sc. M. 

Lucy Shepard, B. Sc, 
Ida Twitchell, B. Sc. 
E. (r. Tyler, B. C. E. 

T. F. Lee. B. Sc. 
G. W. Wilson. B. C. E., 
•J. W. \\ nitney. B. Sc. 
Belle Woods. B. Sc, 



Wheatland, 


Iowa. 




Sigourney, 


Iowa. 




Storj City, 


Iowa. 




Golden, 


Colorado. 




Ames. 


Iowa. 




Pawnee City, 


Nebraska. 




Wadsworth, 


Nevada. 




Vermillion, 


Dakota. 




l)es Moines. 


Iowa. 




Aurelia, 


Iowa. 




Jesup, 


Iowa. 




.Ames. 


Iowa. 




Jesup, 


Iowa. 




Sc 






Boston, 


Mass. 




Santa Barbara, 


California. 




La Graciosa, 


California. 




Logan, 


Iowa. 




Valparaiso, 


Indiana. 




Prairieburg, 


Iowa. 




Woodbine, 


Iowa. — Total 


21 



Graduates of 1879. 



Matilda C.Cleaver,B. Sc, 
S.Carrie [Carter]Hanson, B. 

Lillie M. Croy, B. Sc, 
G.C.Faville,B.Sc,D.V.M., 
F. N. Field. B. C. E., 
F. II. Friend. 15. C. E., 
A. L. Hanson. B. C. E., 
T. V. Hoggett, B. Sc. 
J. E. Hyde, B. Sc. 
L. L. Manwaring, B. Sc. 1 1 

W. G. McConnon, B.M.E. 
•Jennie E. McElyea, I>. Sc. 
*J. C. Noble, B. Sc 

Il.Osborn. B. Sc. M. Sc. Ames. 



Eubanks. 


Kentucky. 


Sc. 




Comstock, 


Dakota. 


Ontario. 


Iowa. 


Mitchell. 


Iowa. 


Burlington, 


Iowa. 


Anamosa. 


Iowa. 


Comstock. 


Dakota. 


Ames. 


Iowa. 


St. Joseph. 


Missouri. 


,L. 13.), 




Menomonee, 


Wisconsin 


Newark, 


X.J. 


Ames. 


Iowa. 



Iowa. 



tmva Agricultural College 



•J. I). Shearer, 15. 8c. 


Laporte City 


Iowa. 


F. Turner, B. M. E.. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


W. M. Scott, B. So.. 


Grand Forks. 


Dakota. 


J. M. Waugh, B.Sp., 


Bellville, 


Illinois. 


Genevieve [Welch] Hai> 


tow, B. Sc, 






Ames. 


Iowa. 


W. Whited,B.M.E.,M. 


E.,Wansan, 


Wisconsin. 


Alice Whited, B. Sc., 


Eldora, 
Graduates of 1880. 


Iowa.— Total 21. 


M. J. Bailey, B. Sc 


Shenandoah. 


Iowa. 


D. I). Briggs, B. Sc. 


Xevada. 


Iowa. 


F. Boddy, B. Sc. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


(). S. Brown. B. Sc. 


Board in an. 


Iowa. 


M. IT. Hakes, B. Sc. 


Martelle, 


Iowa. 


J. Hassett, B. Sc. 


Leadville. 


Colorado. 


E. D. Harvey, B. Sc. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


I). S. Hardin, B. Sc. 


Beatrice, 


Nebraska. 


Carrie C, Lane, B. Sc, 


Charles City. 


Iowa. 


C. II. McGTew, B. Sc, 


Dayton, 


Illinois. 


R. M. Nicholson, B. Sc, 


Utica, 


Illinois. 


G. E. Reed, B. Sc. 


Vinton, 


Iowa. 


J. L. Simcoke, B. Sc, 


Redfield, 


Iowa. 


C. D. Taylor, B. Sc. 


West Liberty, 


Iowa. 


W. A. Thomas, B. V. M. 


, Lincoln. 


Nebraska. 


J. Vincent, Jr, B. V. M. 


Tabor. 


Iowa. 


\V\ B. Welch. B. Sc, 


Corning, 


Iowa.— Total 17. 


►Deceased! 







fetid Agricultural College. 



l:: 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



Resident Graduates 
Bodtly. Frank. B. Sc., Iowa Falls. 

Georgeson. C. C, (M. Sc. Mich.). 

Muneey, J. N., B. Sc, 



Arm strong, Stough E.. 
Armstrong, William C 
Bell, Xellie M.. 
Beresford. Alex M.. 
Bnrke, Thomas, 
Crossmun, Manila J.. 
Coe. Charles M.. 
Colby. Frank E.. 
Dewell, James S.. 
Podge. Carlton A. 
Fortner. Elbert C. 
Furry, Frank E.. 
Furry. Mark J.. 
Manford, Julia M., 
Match, Andrew A.. 
Hopkins, Robert J.. 
Lorbeer, Charles I.. 
May. Alonzo C. 
McGavern, John S.. 
McIIenry. AVill II.. 
McElroy, William ()., 
Perrett. Fannie J.. 
Sayles. Alice L, 
Shearer, Thomas W.. 



Hardin. 



College Station. 


Texas. 


Jesup. 


Iowa. 


Senior Class. 




Polk City. 


Polk. 


Albion. 


Marshall. 


Clarence, 


Cedar. 


Vinton, 


Benton. 


Sigourney. 


Keokuk. 


Ames. 


Story. 


Tipton. 


Cedar. 


Onawa. 


Monona. 


Clarence, 


Cedar. 


Exira, 


Audubon 


Waverly. 


Bremer. 


Alden. 


Hardin. 


Alden. 


Hardin. 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Big Rock. 


Clinton. 


Swede Point. 


Boone. 


Humboldt. 


Humboldt. 


Richland, 


Keokuk. 


Missouri Valley. 


Harrison. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Newton, 


Jasper. - 


Hock Falls. 


Cerro Gordo 


Manchester. 


Delaware. 


Ames, 


Story. 



14 



Iowa Agricultural College. 



Atkinson, William. 
Blaine, John A.. 
Budd, Etta M.. 
Catt, George W., 
Cue. Mary II.. 
Dodds, William Y. A. 
Dudley, William M. 5 
Farwell, Lima. 
Frater, Abbie M., 
Frater, Jessie E., 
Gabel, Henry J., 
Lane, Xellie L.. 
Marsh. James. 
Merrill. Nellie 15., 
McDonald ,Edwin A.. 
Xeal. Delia A.. 
Patten. John II.. 
Peterson, Oscar C. 
Perrett, Lizzie, 
Perrett, Ilattie A.. 
Reeves, Kittie E.. 
Savior. Charles F., 
Smith. Sarah E., 
Stockman. David T.. 
Summers, William S.. 
Wheeler, William W.. 
White. William P.. 



Alexander, Enoch A 
Allen. Adolplms M. 
Andrews. Allison ( \. 
Bracken, Phe A.. 
Bowers, Fred II.. 
Boynton, Fred L., 
Burnham, Guy M., 
Butcher, Rolla, Jr., 
Budd, Allen J.. 
Bullock, Ellsworth, 

< laven, < reorge, 

< link. ( lharles J.. 



Junior Class. 




Anamosa, 


Jones. 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


Ames, 


Story. 


West Side. 


Crawford. 


Clarence. 


Cedar. 


LeClair, 


Scott. 


Ontario. 


Story. 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Clarence, 


Cedar. 


Clarence. 


Cedar. 


LeClair, 


Scott. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Fredricksbur^, 


Chickasaw. 


Rock lord. 


Floyd. 


Mt. Pleasant. 


Henry. 


Ames. 


Story. 


New Liberty. 


Scott. 


Eaton. 


Oreene. 


Rock Palis, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Rock Falls. 


Cerro Gordo. 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Saylorville, 


Polk. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Richland. 


Keoknk. 


Ransom. 


Illinois. 


Monticello. 


Jones. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Sophomore Class. 




Hamburg, 


Fremont. 


State Centre, 


Marshall. 


Redfield, 


Dallas 


Sigourney, 


Keoknk. 


Anamosa. 


Jones. 


West Side, 


Crawford. 


La Porte City, 


Blackhawk. 


Butte City, 


Montana Tei 


Ames. 


Story. 


Post Nation, 


Clinton. 


( )skaloosa. 


Mahaska. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 



Iowa Agricultural College. 



K) 



Carson. Man L. 
Cherrie, Martin 15.. 
Christman, Jennie L.. 
Coe, Victor G., 
Colclo, Jennie M.. 
Curtis. George W.. 
Dickey, William P.. 
Doxsee, Clarence M.. 
Estes, Lottie. 
Grace, George E., 
Iliniiian. Alfred. 
Hunter. RollinM., 
Knapp, Minnie. 
Knap]). Herman. 
Ket'i'er. Charles A.. 
Kegley. Charles II.. 
Kimball. Charles E.: 
Lambert, Frank S.. 
Langfitt, Horace J. 
McCarthy, Maria, 
McNeil. Kate. 
McHenry, Walter S.. 
Miller, Anthony M.. 
McDonald, Mary M., 
Moore, Isaac G„ 
Noble, Jessie. 
Reeve, Herman D., 
Reeve, Emma A.. 
Reeves. Elmer M.. 
Riggs, Morris J.. 
Rutherford, Ashley F.. 
Slater, Etlie G., 
Smait. Harry J.. 
Stebbins, Ellsworth II.. 
Smith. Florence. 
Scoonover, Clinton. 
Scott. William A., 
Scott. Samuel C, 
West. Agatha M.. 
Wells. Myron I-:.. 
Wells, William 1).. 
Williams, Lewis O., 



Marseilles, 


Illinois. 


Knowille. 


Marion. 


Ames. 


Stors . 


Clarence, 


( 'edar. 


Carroll. 


Carroll. 


Monticello, 


.Jones. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Bowens Prairie, 


•Jones. 


Ashawa. 


Polk. 


Dixon. 


Scott. 


Mineral Ridge. 


Boone. 


Ames. 


Story. 


Ames. 


Story. 


Ames. 


Story. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Anamosa. 


•Jones. 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


15ig- Rock, 


Scott. 


Ames. 


Story. 


Garden Grove, 


1 >ecatur. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Mt. Pleasant. 


Henry. 


Rockwell. 


Cerro Gordo 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Geneva, 


Franklin. 


Geneva, 


Franklin. 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Horton, 


Bremer. 


Swede Point. 


Boone. 


Ames. 


Story. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


La Porte City, 


Blackhawk. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Swede Point, 


Boone, 


LaMoille, 


Marshall. 


Lyons. 


Clinton. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cherokee. 


Cherokee. 


Waterloo, 


Plackhaw k. 


Glenwood, 


Mills. 



16 



Iowa AyriatUurol Gottegt . 



White. Georgiana. 


Pes Moines. 


Polk. 


Young, Mabel A.. 


Alden, 


Hardin. 


Young. Charles 1).. 


Alden. 


Hardin. 



Freshman Class. 



Atkinson. George. 


Anamosa. 


Jones. 


Armstrong. Fremont J.. 


Albion. 


Marshall. 


Barrett. Kittle L. 


Ames. 


Story. 


Baldwin, Fred E., 


Ues Moines. 


Polk. 


Brainard, Frank S.. 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Beal. Henry ('.. 


Belle Plaine, 


Tama. 


Belden, Arabella, 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Bevington, Thomas, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Bell, Mary E., 


Clarence, 


Cedar. 


Bern is. Arthur R., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Benson, May C. 


Manchester. 


Delaware. 


Briggs, Mary. 


Kellogg. 


Jasper. 


Briggs, Willie. 


Kellogg, 


Jasper. 


Bowers. Oliver II. P.. 


Anamosa, 


Jones. 


Boots, J. IT.. 


Amber. 


Jones. 


Brown. Edward. 


Davenport. 


Scott. 


Champion, Lee, 


Malcolm, 


Poweshiek 


('apron, Ella, 


State Centre. 


Marshall. 


Chatburn, Cecile J., 


Harlan. 


Shelby. 


Chatburn, George R. 


Harlan. 


Shelby. 


Catt, Margaret L., 


West Side. 


Crawford. 


Cherne, George K.. 


Knoxville, 


Marion. 


Cripps, Mary E., 


Albion. 


Marshall. 


Conable, Laura. 


Shell Rock, 


Butler. 


Daugherty, .John E., 


Yillisca, 


Adams. 


Elder, Mary L\. 


Upper Grove, 


Hancock. 


Frazier, George !>.. 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Freeman, Benjamin A.. 


Clarence, 


Cedar. 


Fiegenbaum, Emma L.. 


Gamer. 


Hancock. 


Finch. .Joseph F.. 


Wyoming, 


Jones. 


F<>\. George A.. 


Clarence, 


Cedar. 


Garrett, Lewis M., 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


Green, Frank ().. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Gill. James W.. 


Granger, 


Missouri. 


Gilbert. Lottie M.. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gilcrest. -John s.. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


(iron. Edward II.. 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 



Towa Agricultural ( 'ollegi 



17 



(. uyer, Clara A., 
Hansen. Helen. 
Ilatton. William M., 
1 1 en rv. Annie E.. 
Bibbs, George !>.. 
Hitchcock Alberts. 
Huntley. Fred., 
Jackson, Lewis L)., 
Kegley, Lizzie M., 
Kemper, Arthur L., 
Keith. Charles II., 
Kuhns, George, 
Larrabee, Charles, 
Lanning, Joe D. 
Lewis, William P., 
McGavern, Horatio S.. 
Moats, Mary A.. 
Moore, John M.. 
Xellis. William B., 
Xichol. Mary L. 
Noble. Theron A. 
Noble, Charles P., 
Patten, William P. 
Pitman. Fred L.. 
Porter, Joseph F. , 
Quint. Albion L.. 
Rice, Addie 
Swart, Warren 
Stamm, Oscar. 
Smith. Amanda J. 
Smith, Frank S., 
Smith, John J. 
Smith. M. Lula, 
Schricker, William E.. 
Simcoke, William. 
Switzer. Frank. 
Sloan. Charles IL. 
Snow, May 

Thompson, George W., 
Van Campen, Anson C 
Vincent, Cuthbert 
Wallahan, Jessie F.. 
Warner. Daniel W.. 



Grand Junction, 


Greene. 


Mapleton, 


Monona. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Ames, 


story. 


Mitchellville, 


Polk. 


Atchinson, 


Kansas. 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Sigourney. 


Keokuk. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Grinnell, 


Poweshiek. 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Buffalo, 


Scott. 


Clermont. 


Fayette, 


LaFayette. 


Lynn. 


Victor, 


Iowa. 


Missouri Valley, 


Harrison. 


Villisca, 


Montgomery; 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Xew Sharon. 


Mahaska. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Ames. 


Story. 


Xew Liberty. 


Scott, 


Conway, 


Taylor. 


Woodbine. 


Harrison. 


Guthrie. 


Guthrie. 


Jesup, 


Buchanan. 


Dayton. 


Webster. 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Independence. 


Buchanan. 


Monroe, 


Jasper. 


Brooklyn. 


Poweshiek. 


Davenport. 


Scott. 


Redfield, 


Dallas. 


Lewis, 


('ass. 


Monticello. 


Jones. 


Fairmont. 


Minnesota. 


Casey, 


Guthrie. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Tabor. 


Fremont. 


East Nodaway, 


Adams. 


Panora. 


(J nth rie. 



18 



Iowa Agricultural College. 



Weatherby, Olive, 


Denison, 


Crawford. 


Week, Frank D., 


Clermont, 


Fayette. 


Wight, William, 


Jefferson. 


Greene. 


Winter. Mattie, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Winter, Emma M. 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Wise, Harry. 


Hamburg, 


Fremont. 


Winget, Arthur S. 


Harper, 


Keokuk. 


Wicks. William J., 


Harlan, 


Shelby. 


Wier. William II.. 


Story City. 


Story. 


Williams, Charles F. 


Waverly. 


Bremer. 


Wormley, George W. 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Wood, Carrie, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wyman, James II., 


Des Moines, 
Sub- Freshman Class. 


Polk. 


Adams, Charlie E., 


Cameron, 


Missouri. 


Anderson, Walter T. 


, Monroe, 


Jasper. 


Besser, Charles A.. 


Harper, 


Fayette. 


Drake, Arthur I. 


Northfield, 


Minnesota. 


Huff, Edwin J. 


Eldora, 


Hardin. 


Johnston, Minnie, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Murray, Robert P.. 


Harlan, 


Shelby. 


Shaw, Loyd L., 


Dixon, 


Illinois. 


Saxton, Jessie A.. 


Bear Grove, 


Guthrie- 


Spencer, Charles 1,., 


Ames. 


Story. 


Spence, Jennie. 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


Smith, Fred S.. 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Wellemeyer. Mary. 


Garner, 


HancocR. 


Weiser. Charles J., 


De corah. 


Winneshiek 


Williams. Anna 


Polk City. 
Veterinary Schoob-Seniors. 


Polk. 


Cramblit, Eli B., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Fisher, Frank M., 


Ames. 


Story. 


Holyoke, Robert A., 


Grinnell, 
Juniors. 


Poweshiek. 


Carington. Henry F.. 


Sheldahl, 
Special Sltulents. 


Story. 


Butcher, Emma F, 


Butte City. 


Montana. 


Hunting, Charles S.. 


Des Moines 


Polk. 


Walton, Mice B.. 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 



Iowa Agricultural ( 'ollcyi . in 



HISTORICAL. 

In 1858 the Legislature of Iowa passed an act to' establish an 
Agricultural College for the purpose of giving a higher education 
to the industrial classes. By the same act means were provided 
for the selection of a farm, the location of college buildings, and 
for experimentation in agriculture. In 1859 a farm of six hundred 
and forty acres, situated in Story county, near Ames, was selected 
and purchased for the use of the College. In 1862a hill was passed" 
by Congress donating public lands to the several states for the 
endowment of Colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the 
mechanic arts. Section 4 of this act requires : 

" That all moneys derived from the sale of the lands aforesaid 
by the states to which the lands are apportioned, and from the sale 
«»f land-scrip hereinbefore provided for, shall be invested in stocks 
of the. United States, or of the states, or some other safe stocks, 
yielding not less than five per centum upon the par value of said 
stocks; and that the money so invested shall constitute a perpetual 
fund, the capital of which shall remain forever undiminished, (ex- 
cept so far as may be provided in section fifth of this act), and the 
interest of which shall be inviolably appropriated by each state, 
which may take and claim the benefit of this act, to the endow- 
ment, support and maintenance of at least one college, where the 
leading object shall be. without excluding other scientific and clas- 
sical studies and including military tactics, to teach such branches 
of Learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic ails, in 
such manner as the legislatures of the states may prescribe, in 
older to promote the liberal and practical education of the indus- 
trial (dasses in the several pursuits and professions of life."' 

The Ninth General Assembly accepted the grant upon the con- 
ditions and under the restrictions contained in the act of Congress, 
and required the Governor to appoint an agent to select and locate 
the lands granted. 

The State law requires that Hie following branches shall be 
taught, (Section 1H21 of the (-ode.) 

" The course of instruction and practice in said College shall 
include tin' following blanches. Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, 



20 Iowa Agricultural College. 

Botany, Horticulture, Fruit-growing, Forestry. Animal and Vege- 
table Anatomy, Geology, Mineralogy, Meteorology, Entomology, 
Zoology, the Veterinary Art, Plane Mensuration, Leveling, Sur- 
veying. Book-keeping, and such Mechanic arts as are directly con- 
nected with agriculture; also, such other studies as the trustee's 
may from time to time pi-escribe not inconsistent with the purposes 
of this chapter/' 

The (College was formally opened on the 17th of March. ]8<>«». 
It will, consequently, at the close of the present term complete its 
thirteenth year. 



LOCATION. 

The College occupies a pleasant and healthful location, one and 
a half miles west of the town of Ames, on the Chicago and North- 
western Railway, in "the central county of the state (Story), and 
thirty miles north of the city of Pes Moines. The railroad facili- 
ties for reaching Ames from any part of the state are very good. 
Regular conveyances for passengers and baggage run between the 
station and the College, three times each day, 






Iinrii . [ij, (cultural ( 'olh </< 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

The Maim" College Building is tour stories high above the 
basement, and is 158 feet long by 112 feet deep through the wings. 

In the basement are the dining-room, kiteiien. laundry, office, and 
and armory. On the first floor are the chapel, president's office, 
treasurer's office, and library. The second floor contains several 
recitation rooms and rooms for students. The third and fourth 
floors contain student rooms and the zoological and geological 
museum. About 200 persons can be accomodated in this building. 
All the rooms are heated by steam and lighted with gas. Water is 
supplied in all the stories. 

The Boarding Cottage is a brick building, 38 by 45 feet, with 
two stories affording rooms for thirty students, and a basement in 
which are kitchen, store-room and dining room. 

The Chemical and Physical Hall is a large, two-story brick 
building. 70 by 44 feet, with a wing 01 by 33 feet. The first floor 
contains the chemical laboratories, the second, the physical labora- 
tory, apparatus and lecture room, while two draughting rooms 
oecupy the attic. In the basement are the machine shops and a 
large recitation room. This building is warmed by steam, and 
supplied with water and gas. 

North Hall, is a two-story brick building, 40 by 70 feet. On 
the first floor it affords rooms for the departments of Agriculture 
and Veterinary Science. On the second floor are the Microscopic- 
al Laboratory, and the rooms for the Botanical department. 

TheHoBTiciTLTURALBuiLDiNG is a wooden structure containing 

on the first floor a lecture room, professor's room, and seed room. 
On the second floor is the Horticultural museum. The cellar has 
two large rooms, one for the storage of garden products, the other 
for the use of the nursery propagating department. A grafting 
room and propagating house are attached, heated with hot-water 
pipes. 



Imrii Agricultural College. 



South Hall is a two-story brick building provided with ample 
cellars. It has been refitted for a Boarding Hall and for the 
department of Domestic Economy. 

The Fa km House is a plain, substantial, brick building, occu- 
pied by the Professor of Agriculture, Three other dwelling 
houses 1 11 u u i the college grounds arc occupied by professoi's 
families. 

The College Creamery is a low frame building, just east of 
the farm house. The farm barns are adjacent. — one of brick, for 
horses, and one large frame barn in the basement of which is a 
stable for one hundred head of cattle. The feeding barn 52 by 56 
feet, and the piggery 36 by 96 feet are models of handiness. Both 
occupy sites east of the other farm buildings. 

The Work-shop, Laundry and Gas-works are some distance 
back of the Main College building. The work-shop is a two-story 
frame building, lifted up with machinery and tools for the prose- 
cution of repairs and for instruction in mechanical work. 

THE COLLEGE GROUNDS. 

The College Farm includes 860 acres, and of this about seventy 
acres are set apart for the College Grounds. These occupy the 
high land of the southwest part of the farm, and include a large 
lawn, shrubbery plantations, young forestry plantations, the flower 
borders and garden, with the surroundings of the professor's dwell- 
ing houses. Excellent gravel drives and walks have been laid 
down, leading to all parts of the grounds, and to the various build- 
ings. 



Iowa Agricultural ( 'ollege 23 



ORGANIZATION. 

The branches of learning, taught in the College are arranged 
under several courses of study, which are distinguished as General 
and Technical. Under the tirst. the 

Coursi iii /In Sciences Related to the Industries, aims to give a lib- 
eral culture in the sciences and other branches of learning, which 
underlie the great industries of the country, without especially con- 
fining it to aiiy particular pursuit or profession. The technical 
courses, while giving a liberal culture, aim to direct that culture 
so as to meet the requirements of a special pursuit or profession. 
The technical courses, which have been fully established are the 
following: 

1. The Course in Agriculture, which requires four *years of study 
and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Scientific Agriculture, 

B. S. A.): 

2. The Course in Mechanical Engineering, of four years, and 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering, 
(B. M. E.): 

3. The Course in Civil Engineering, ot four years, leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Civil Engineering, (B. C. E.): 

4. Tlie Course in Veterinary Science, two years in length, leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine, (B. V. M.) 

The technical courses are arranged under schools having spec- 
ial Faculties. 

The relation of the several courses to one another may be more 
readily shown as follows: 

GENERAL. 

The Course in Sciences Related to the Industries. 

TECHNICAL. 

I. The School of AGRlCTTLTtTRE. 

Containing, (1.) The Course in Agriculture, 



:>4 Iowa Agricultural College. 

IT. The School OF ENGINEERING. 

Containing, (2.) The Course in Mechanical Engineering. 
(3.) The Course in Civil Engineering. 

III. The School of Veterinary Science. 

Containing, (4.) The Course in Veterinary Science. 



In addition to the foregoing, there are certain lines of technical 
and scientific study which include either a single prominent sci- 
ence or several closely related ones, which may be pursued exclu- 
sively by students properly qualified. These, however, do not lead 
to any degree, and any student completing the studies of any such 
line may receive the College Certificate showing his standing in 
such studies. 

These lines of studies are designated as follows: 1. Domestic 
Economy. 2. Military Science. 8. Literature and Language. 4. 
Mathematics and Physics. .1. Chemistry. (>. Biology. 7. Philos- 
ophy. 



Iowa Agricultural < 'ollegi . 



COURSE IN SCIENCES RELATED TO THE 
INDUSTRIES. 

The purpose of this Course is to give a scientific training in the 
branches which are related to the industries, and to furnish a lib- 
eral and practical education for young men and women in the sev- 
eral pursuits and professions of life. 

The course consists of the required antecedent studies in the 
Freshman year and the first term of the Sophomore year, of the 
general branches pursued in the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior 
years, and of the natural and physical sciences which predominate 
throughout. 

As this course is taken by students of both sexes it is given a 
considerable degree of flexibility to meet the wants of each. This 
is accomplished by means of certain " additional studies," which 
have been carefully selected for their value to the student. This 
course thus provides for the young women of the college opportu- 
nities for devoting more time to Domestic Economy and kindred 
subjects, while the young men are permitted to give more atten- 
tion to those applications of science which are of more especial 
value to them. 

For the purpose of enabling students of the Junior and Senior 
classes in this course to attain a high degree of proficiency in some 
branches of science, the Faculty permit a choice of certain studies 
and the omission of others. The special studies now provided for 
in this way are Chemistry, Botany, Zoology, Mathematics and 
Physics, and Veterinary Science. 

GRADUATION WD THE DEGREE. 

The graduate of this course is entitled to thedegree of Bachelor 
of Science. The candidate for graduation must have secured a 
standing of at least three, (four being perfect,) in all the studies 
(not optional) of the subjoined list, and must present a final thesis 
as required by college law. 



26 Iowa Agricultural College 



COURSE OfF 1 STTJIDY. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Additional Studies for Additional Studies for 

young men. yonng women. 

Advanced Algebra— 5, fourteen wks. 
Geometry begun— 5. four wks. 
Bookkeeping— 3. 

Rhetoric— 3, or 
Latin or German—',. 
Drawing— 2. 

( 'imposition — l. 

Practical Agriculture— 2 Domestic Economy with 

Military Drill— l. practice— l. 



SECOND TERM 

Geometry— 5. 

Elementary Botany— 2. 

I descriptive Zoology— 2. 

Peabody's Moral Science— 3, or 

Latin >>r German— 5. 

Drawing— 1. 

Composition— l. 
Practical Horticulture— 2. 
Military Drill— l. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Botany— 2. 

Genera] Chemistry— 3. 

Laboratory practice- -2, 
General Zoology— 2. 
Physics ; Mechanics of Solids. 

Liquids and Gases- -'. 

Plane Trigonometry -5, Plane Trigonometry- ■'>, 

nine weeks. nineiveeks. 

Land Surveying ■ >. nine History— 2, nine weeks. 

weeks. Domestic Economy Lee- 
Field practice 2, lures— 1. 
Military Drill 1. 

Two Essays. 



/<<"■<< Agricultural College 



RRCON [1 TERM. 

Zoologj and Entomologj 5. 

Laboratory practice i. 
Botanj : Vegetable Anatomy 2. 

Laboratory practice i. 
Physics : Light and Sound .;. 



General Chemistry 2. 

Laboratory practice— 2. 
* Analytical Geometry -">. 
stock bleeding- 1 
Military Drill 1 



'.< n< ;-o/ Chemistry 2 
Laboratory practto 
1. or 
* Analytical Geometry ■ 



Two I 



.11 SlOU VEAIi 



II RST TERM. 

Botany ; Vegetable Anatomy and 
and Physiology 1. 

Laboratory practice 1. 
Physics; Ileal- :;. 

Laboratory practice in Zoologj I. 
Englisli Literature 5. 



Quantitative Chemistry 
Laboratory practice 
■■< ktlculitx—T*. 
Military Drill— 1. 



Quantitative Chemistry 2. 
Laboratory practice— 

_'. or 
*Calcuhi8 '. 



Two K 



SECOND TERM. 

Comparative Anatomy— 4. 
Political Eeonomy-3. 



Physics ; Electricity Mag 
netisni and Meteorol- 
ogy— 2 

Landscape Gardening— 3, 

nine weeks. 
Farm Engineering— 3, nine 

weeks. 
Organic Chemistry 2. 

Laboratory practice— 3. 
Military Drill— 1. 



Physics; Electricity, Mag' 
netism and Meteorol- 
ogy 2, or 
Landscape Gardening— 3, 

nine weeks. 
Domestic Economy, prac- 
tice in kitchen— 1. 
Domestic Chemistry— l. 
French—."). 



Two l)i 



♦Optional to students who have an averagi 
first term of the Sophomore year, 



anding of 3 



in studies of tin 



28 Iowa Agricultural College 

SENIOR YEAR. 
FTRSTTERM. 

Geology and Mineralogy— 5. 
Psychology— 5. 
Agricultural Chemistry— 2. French- 

Anatomy of Domestic Ani- 
mals— 5. 
Clinics and Dissections— 2. 
Military Drill— 1. 

Two Dissertations. 



SECOKD TEKM. 

Science of Language— 5. 
Classification of the Sciences— 5, 

three weeks. 
Sociology— 5, nine weeks. 
Veterinary Medicine 2, French 

Clinics and Dissections 'J. 
Lectures on Foods— 1. 

Preparation of Theses. 



SPECIAL STUDIES. 

Only those students who have shown proficiency in a certain 
si ud v. maintaining a standing of at- least 3.C0, are allowed to 

specialize in it. 

No permission will be given to specialize in literary studies; 
neither will a student who chooses special studies he permitted to 
Like any optional ones of the regular course. 

The omissions and substitutions allowed to those who wish to 
specialize in certain sciences are as follows: — 

The special student in CHEMISTRY tnay omit, 

Ji'Nion Ykak First '/'it hi Botany or Physics. 

Secimd Term Comparative Anatomy, or Physics, or Landscape 
Gardening. 
i iiok Ykak First Tcnn (ieology or Veterinary Science. 

Secimd Tt < rm Veterinary Science or Science of Language, 



loin i . [gncuUural ( 'olkyi . 



The Special Student in ISot.wv may omit, 
.li Mm; Vkai! First Term Physics. 

Second Term Physics, 
Senior Yi m; First Term -Geology or Veterinary Science. 

Second Term Veterinary Science or Science of Language, 

The special student in Zoology may omit, 

.h m<m; Yeas lirst Tom Chemistrj or Physics. 

Second Term— Chemistry, or Physics <n French. 
Senior Year— First Term Geology, or Veterinary Science, or French. 

Second Term Veterinary science or French. 

The special student in MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS may omit, 

Soph. Year —Second Term— Botany or Zoology. 
Junior Year— First Term —Botany. 

Second Term— Comparative Anatomy or Landscape Gardening 
Senior Year— First Term —Geology, or Veterinary Science, or Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

Second Term Veterinary Science or Science of Language. 



The special student in Veterinary Science may omit. 

Senior Year— First Term —Geology. 

Second Term — Science of Language. 



30 Iowa Agricultural College. 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. 

SPECIAL FACULTY. 
The President. 
s. A. Knapp, Dean, .J. K. Macomber, 

Agriculture. Physics. 

.1. I.. Brnn. C. E. Bessey, 

Horticulture. Botany. 

M. Stalker, F. E. L. Beal, 

Veterinary Science. Zoology. 

T. E. Pope, Herbert Osborn. 

( Chemistry. Entomology, 



.James Gilmore, 

Foreman of Farm. 

William Westover, Jerry Sexton, 

Foreman f)i' Stock. Foreman of Garden. 

COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

The design of the course in Agriculture is to furnish a broad 
mikI thoroughly practical education, giving it such direction as 
will be especially applicable to the life and duties of the farmer. 
The course lias been framed to combine that knowledge and skill 
which will best prepare the pupil for the highest demands of agri- 
cultural industry, and to meet the requirements of an educated 
cit izenship. 

This course requires the antecedent studies necessary for admis- 
sion to the regular Freshman class, and includes most of the gen- 
eral branches taught in the college, with such technical studies as 
are the hasis of success in Agriculture. 

GRADUATION. 

The graduate of this course is entitled to the decree of Bachelor 
of Scientific Agrieull ure. 

The candidate for graduation must meet college' requirements 
in standing, in all the studies pursued, and present a final thesis, in 
accordance with law. upon some special topic in Agriculture. 



Iowa Agricultural ( bllege. •!! 



COURSE OIF STTJID"Y-. 

FRESHMAN STEAK. 
BTB8T TSRM. 

Practical Agricultun — 2. 

Farm and Garden work 12 hours each week. 
Advanced Algebra — ■ 5, fourteen weeks. 
Geometry begun— 5, tour weeks. 
Book-keeping— 3. 

Ehetoric •'!. German — o. or Latin — 5. 
Drawing— 2. 
Composition — 1. 
Military Drill— 1. 

SECOND TERM. 

Practical Horticulture— 2. 

Farm and Garden work 12 hours each week. 
Elementary Botany — 2. 
1 descriptive Zoology— 2. 
Geometry— 5. 
The Dairy — 3. 
Gi rman — 5, or Latin— 6. 
Drawing— 2. 
Composition— 1 . 
Military Drill— 1. 

SOPHOMORE VE.YK. 
FIRST TERM. 

Botany— 2. 

General Chemistry— 2. 

Laboratory Practice — 2. 
General Zoology— 2. 
Plane Trigonometry— 5, nine weeks. 
Land Surveying— 5, nine weeks. 

Field Practice— 2. 
Physics: Mechanics of Solids. Liquids, and Gases— 2. 
Military Drill— 1. 
Two Essays. 

SECOND TERM. 

Stock-Breeding— 3. 

Horticulture— 2. 

Botany: Vegetable Anatomy— 2. 

Laboratory Practice— 1 . 
General Chemistry— 2. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 
Entomology— 3. 



32 Iowa Agricultural College. 

Laboratory Practice— 1 . 

Physics: Light and Sound— 3. 
Military Drill— 1. 

Two Essays. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Farm Economy— 3. 

Horticulture— 1, eleven weeks; —5, seven weeks. 

Practice in Agriculture and Horticulture (i hours each week. 
Botany: Vegetable Anatomy and Physiology— 4, eleven weeks. 

Laboratory practice— 1. 
Physics: Heat— 3. 
English Literature—"). 
Two Essays. 

SECOND TERM. 

How Crops Feed and Grow— 2. 

Practice in Agriculture <> hours each week. 
I [orticulture— 3. 

Landscape Gardening— 3, nine weeks. 
Farm Engineering— 3, nine weeks. 
Organic Chemistry— 2. 
Political Economy— 3. 
Commercial Law — 2. 
Two Dissertations. 
Military Drill— 1. 

SENIOR VEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Agricultural Chemistry — 2. 

Laboratory Practice in Agriculture 4 hours each week. 
Veterinary Science: Anatomy and Physiology— 5. 

Clinics and Dissections— 2. 
Geology and Mineralogy—o. 
Psychology — ">. 
Two Dissertations. 
Military Drill— 1. 

SECOND TERM. 

Experimental Agriculture—"). 

Laboratory Practice I! hours each week. 
Veterinarj Science: Diseases, Treatment, and Medicine— 2. 

Clinics and Dissections— 2. 
Lectures on Foods— 1. 

Classification of the Sciences — "), three-weeks. 
Sociology 5, nine weeks. 

Preparation of Theses. 



Imni Agricultural t 'olleyi . :;:; 



THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING. 

SPECIAL FACULTY. 
The President. 

A. Thomson-. Dean, E. AV. Stanton, 

Mechanical Engineering. Mathematics. 

F. E. L. Beal, T. E. Pope, 

Civil Engineering. Chemistrj . 

C. F. Mount, J. K. Macomuek, 

Civil Engineering. Physics. 



Fremont Turner, 

Foreman and Teacher in the Workshop. 

COURSE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

The object of this course is to impart such scientific knowledge 
and practical skill as are essential to success in mechanical engin- 
eering. This demands a thorough mastery of the principles of 
mathematics and a diligent study of their application to the con- 
struction of machines. In addition to the technical instruction 
given, it aims to furnish the means for obtaining a liberal and 
practical education. 

The course of study embraces the required antecedent studies 
of the first year and a half; also, a few general branches in the 
Junior and Senior years and the entire technical course of study 
and practice necessary to the master workman. 

GRADUATION. 

Each graduate is entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Mechan- 
ical Engineering. Graduation requires a standing of at least three 
(four being perfect) in all the studies of the following list, and the 
presentation of a final thesis in Mechanical Engineering. 



r>4 Iowa Agricultural College. 



COURSE OIF STUDY. 
FBESHMAN YEAR. 

FIRST TKHM. 

Practical Mechanics— 2. 

Shop Practice -2. 
Advanced Algebra— 5, fourteen weeks. 
Geometry begun — 5, four weeks. 
Book-keeping— 3. 

Rhetoric — 3, German — 5, or Latin — 5. 
Drawing— 2. 
( Jomposition — 1 . 
Military Drill— 1. 

SECOND TERM. 

Practical Mechanics— 2. 

Shop Practice— 3. 
Geometry— 5. 
Elementary Botany— 2. 
Descriptive Zoology— 2. 

Peabody's Moral Science — 3, German — 5, or Latin— 5. 
Drawing— 2. 
( Jomposition — 1. 
Military Drill— 1. 

SOPHOMOHE YBAK. 

FIRST TERM. 

Plane Trigonometry — 5, nine weeks. 
Land Surveying—"), nine weeks. 

Field Practice— 2. 
Physics: Mechanics of Solids, Liquids, and Gases— 2 
General Chemistry— 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 
Botany— 2. 
General Zoology— 2. 
Military Drill— 1. 
Two Essays. 

SECOND TERM. 

Principles of Mechanism— -2. 

Drawing— 2. 
Analytical Geometry — 5. 
Descriptive Geometry— 2. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 
spherical Trigonometry— 1 . 
Physics: Light and Sound— 3. 
Military Drill I. 
Two Kssa\ s. 



I'uni Agricultural ( blh <j< ;;; > 



JUNIOR STEAK". 

FIRST IT. KM. 

Principles of Mechanism - 5, nine weeks. 
Analytical Mechanics—"), nine weeks. 

Shop Practice— '1. 
Stereotomy, shades. Shadows, and Perspective— 2. 
Model Drawing— 2. 
Differentia] and Integral Calculus— 5. 
Physics: Heat— 3. 
Military Drill- 1. 
Two Essays. 

second'Term. 

Theoretical and Applied Mechanics-- 5. 
shop Practice— 3. 

Physics: Electricity. Magnetism, and Meteorology— 2. 
Political Economy— 3. 
French—o. 
MilitaryEDrill— 1. 

Two Dissertations. 



SENIOR YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. 

Theory of Motors— 5. 
Shop Practice— 3. 
Mechanical Drawing— 2. 

French—l. 
Psychology—1. 
Geology and Mineralogy — 6. 
Two Dissertations. 
Military Drill— 1. 

SECOND TERM. 

Prime Movers — 5. 

Shop Practice—"). 
Mechanical Designing— 2. 
Classification of the Sciences—"), three weeks. 
Sociology—"), nine weeks. 
French—"). 
Preparation of Theses. 



36 



Iowa Agricultural College. 



COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 

It is the object of this course to educate and thoroughly train 
the student for the work of the Civil Engineer. It furnishes a 
thorough and practical course of instruction in the application of 
the mathematical and physical sciences to the profession of Civil 
Engineering. It furnishes a systematic drill in pure mathematics 
and includes in common with the other courses the studies neces- 
sary to a liberal education. 

The course of study embraces the antecedent studies of the lirst 
three terms and a limited number of general branches in the last 
two years. It comprises a full course of technical study and prac- 
tice preparatory to Civil Engineering. 

GRADUATION. 

Each graduate is entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Civil 
Engineering. 

A standing of at least three (four being perfect) in all the 
studies of the course, and a final thesis in Civil Engineering, are 
the conditions of graduation. 



COURSE OIF STTTID-Y". 

FRESHMAN YEAH. 

FIRST TERM. 

Practical Mechanics— ± 

Shop Practice— 3. 
Advanced Algebra— 5, fourteen weeks. 
Geometry begun— 5, four weeks. 
Book-keeping — 3. 

fflietoHc — 3, or German— 5 or Latin — 5. 
Drawing— -1. 
( iomposition — 1. 
Military Drill— 1. 

SECOND TERM. 

Practical Mechanics— '2. 

Shop Practice— 3. 
( .comet iv— ">. 
Elementary Botany— 2. 
Descriptive Zoology— '1. 

r< tihoihj's Monti Science .">, or Latin — 5 or Germans. 
Drawing— 2. 
Composition I. 
Military Drill -1. 



Towa Agricultural < '<>il,</t 37 



SOPHOMORE YKAlf. 

FIRST TERM. 

Plane Trigonometry— 5, nine weeks. 
Land Surveying — 5, nine weeks. 

Field Practice— 2. 
Physics: Mechanics of Solids. Liquids, and Gases— 2. 
General Chemistry— 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 
Botany— 2. 
Genera] Zoology— 2. 
.Military Drill—!. 
Two Essays. 

SECOND TERM. 

Railroad Surveying— 2. 

Field Practice— 2. 
Analytical Geometry— 5. 
Descriptive Geometry — 2. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 
Spherical Trigonometry — 1 . 
Physics: Light and Sound— 3. 
Military Drill— 1. 
Two Essays. 

JUNIOR YEAH. 
FIRST TERM. 

Docks and Retaining Walls— 5, nine weeks. 

Draughting— 8. 
Analytical Mechanics— 5, nine weeks. 
Stereotomy: Shades, Shadows, and Perspective— 2. 
Model Drawing — 3. 
Differential and Integral Calculus— 5. 
Physics: Heat— 3. 
Military Drill— 1. 
Two Essays. 

SECOND TERM. 

Field practice and office work— 3. 

Theoretical and Applied Mechanics — 5. 

Physics: Electricity, Magnetism, and Meteorology— 2. 

Political Economy— 3. 

French — 5. 

Military Drill— 1. 

Two Dissertations. 



;;s Iowa Agricultural College. 

SENIOE VTCAK. 

FIRST TERM. 

Hoof and Bridge Structures—'). 

Designing— 3. 
Geology and Mineralogy— 5. 
Psychology— -5. 
French—o. 
Military Drill— 1. 
Two Dissertations. 

SECOND TERM. 

Hoof and Bridge Structures— 5. 

Designing—"). 
Astronomy— 2. 

Sanitary Eng., Sewerage and Ventilation— 5, eight weeks. 
French—"). 

Classification of the Sciences—'"), three weeks. 
Preparation of Theses. 



Iowa Agricultural Collegt 39 



THE SCHOOL OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 



SPECIAL FACULTY. 
The President. 
M. Stalker, Dean, F. E. L. Beal, 

Anatomy and Surgery. Zoology and Comparative 

Anatomy. 

I), s. Fairchild, C. E. Bessey, 

Histology, Pathology and The- Medical Botany, 

rapeuties. 

(i. C. FAVILLE, T. E. Pope. 

Veterinary Medicine. Chemistry and Toxicology. 



THE COURSE IN VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

The purpose of this course is to furnish a thorough, practical 
and theoretical training in the veterinary specialty of Medicine 
and Surgery. It aims, furthermore, to prepare young men for the 
practical work of the veterinary profession. 

The course of study includes two years, and embraces a portion 
of the studies of the Course in the Sciences related to the Indus- 
tries, together with the lectures on the technical and special topics 
of the course, and practice in the Microscopical and Anatomical 
laboratories, and the Veterinary Hospital. 

GRADUATION. 

Each graduate is entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Veter- 
inary Medicine. The candidate for graduation must pass his 
examinations with the standings required in the other college 
courses, and present a final thesis in Veterinary Science. 



4(1 Jowa Agricultural College. 

course o:f STTTicsr. 

FIRST, OR JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

General Chemistry— a. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 
General Zoology— 2. 

Laboratory Practice — 1 . 
Anatomy of Domestic Animals— 5. 

Dissections and Clinics— 2. 
Materia Medica— 2. 

SECOND TERM. 

Elementary Botany— 2. 
Comparative Anatomy— 4. 
Anatomy of Domestic Animals— 8. 
General Chemistry — 2. 

Laboratory Practice — 2. 
Materia Medica— 2. 
Veterinary Medicine— 2. 

Dissections and Clinics — 2. 

SECOND, OR SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Medicine and Surgery— 3. 

Medical Botany— 2. 

Therapeutics— 2. 

Organic Chemistry and Toxicology— 2. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 
Histology and Physiology— 5. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 

SECOND TERM. 

Medicine and Surgery— 3. 
Comparative and General Pathology— 5. 

Laboratory Practice— 1 . 
Therapeutics— 2. 
Veterinary ( )bstetrics— 2. 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry— 2. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 
Veterinarj Sanitary Science and Police— 2. 



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Iowa Agricultural < 'ollege. l> 



OTHER STUDIES, DISSERTATIONS, 
DEGREES, ETC. 



SUB-FRESHMEM STUDENTS. 

Should there be room in the dormitories after the students in 
the regular classes are provided for. a limited number of students 
may be received for instruction in studies preparatory to the 
Freshman class. It is. however, the wish of the Faculty and Trus- 
tees that the number taking the sub-Freshman course, be as small 
as possible. 

The studies in which such instruction may be given, are as 
follows: 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra, begun— 5; English Analysis— -V. Drawing— ± 

SECOND TERM. 

Algebra—"), nine weeks; Geometry begun— -5, nine weeks,; Phys- 
iology and Hygiene— 8 or *Descriptive Zoology— 2; Drawing— 2. 
*Tobe taken by those who have passed Physiology and Hygiene. • 



MIXED OPTIONAL COURSES, AND THE COLLEGIATE 
CERTIFICATE. 

Any person of the requisite age and preparation, not a candidate 
lor a degree, who may desire to pursue a line of study in some par- 
ticular science or art, will, upon application to the President, be 
allowed the advantages of the College classes and all other facili- 
ties afforded by the institution. 

Students having successfully pursued a line of study in the 
institution, but not such as to entitle them to graduation will, upon 
application to the Faculty, be granted the College Certificate show- 
ing their standings in such studies. 



46 Iowa Agricultural College. 

DISSERTATIONS IN THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS. 

Junior and Senior students in all the courses are required to 
prepare dissertations upon topics embraced in the studies they are 
pursuing', and approved by the professor and Faculties having 
charge of such studies. The professor shall have entire super- 
vision of the dissertations so written, being sole judge of its fitness 
for reading, and shall report its completion to the President. Two 
such dissertations are required during the last term of the Junior 
year, and two during the first term of the Senior year. 

THE GRADUATING THESIS. 

Every candidate for graduation shall present an acceptable 
thesis upon some distinctive subject in the course of study which 
lie has taken. 

The topic must be selected and submitted for approval before 
the close of the first term of the Senior year, and the completed 
thesis must be presented to the proper Faculty six weeks before 
Commencement day. 

Every thesis must be neatly written upon unruled paper, of a 
size designated by the Faculty; after acceptance and formal read- 
ing, it shall become the property of the College, and shall be depos- 
ited in the Library. 

Ten theses shall be designated for public reading or speaking 
on Commencement day, the general and special Faculties selecting 
each its quota, the basis of such selection being [a] the value of the 
thesis, [6] scholarship in the course of study pursued, and [c] the 
student's conduct during his stay in College; the remaining theses 
shall be read before an open session of the Trustees and Faculty of 
the College. 

Each thesis shall be in the special charge of the Professor g iv- 
ing instruction in the branch of learning upon which it treats, and 
such Professsor will be responsible to the Faculty for its supervi- 
sion and correction . 

THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE. 

Upon the completion of any of the regular courses of study the 
proper Bachelor's Degree is conferred upon the graduate. 

The degree of BACHELOR of SciENCE(B. Sc.) is conferred upon 
the graduate in the Course in the Sciences related to the Industries. 

The degree of Bachelor ok Scientific Agriculture 
(B. S. A.) is conferred upon the graduate in the Course in Agri- 
culture. 



Iowa Agricultural College. 



47 



The degree of Bachelob of Mechanical Engineering 

il). M. E.) is conferred upon the graduate in the Course in 
Mechanical Engineering. 

The degree ot Bachelor of Civil Engineering (B. C. E.) is 

conferred upon the graduate in the Course in Civil Engineering. 

The degree of Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine (B. V.M.) 
is conferred upon the graduate in the Course in Veterinary Science. 

The graduating fee is two dollars. 

HIGHER DEGREES. 

These degrees are conferred upon candidates recommended by 
the Faculty, in conformity with the following rules: 

1. The degree of Master of Science, (M. Sc.) is open to Bach- 
elors of Science who are graduates of the Course in Sciences 
related to the Industries, and previous to 1881, of; the Course in 
Sciences related to Agriculture, and the Ladies Course of this 
College . 

2. The degree of Master of Scientific Agriculture (M. S. A.) is 
open to Bachelors of Scientific Agriculture. 

3. The degree of Mechanical Engineer, (M. E.) is open to 
Bachelors of Mechanical Engineering, and Bachelors of Science 
previous to 1878, who are graduates of the Mechanical Engineering 
course of this College . 

.4 The degree of Civil Engineering (C. E. ) is open to Bachelors 
of Civil Engineering, and Bachelors of Science previous to 1878. 
who are graduates of the Civil Engineering course of this College . 

."). The degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, (D. V, M.) is 
open to Bachelors of Veterinary Medicine. 

i). The degree of Master of Philosophy is open to graduates of 
any of the four-year courses of study of this College. 

7. The Faculty will recommend for the degree of Master of 
Science, candidates otherwise qualified, who, after taking their 
Bachelor's degree, shall reside at the College for at least one year 
and pursue, during that time, a course of scientific study embra- 
cing at least two subjects selected with the approval of the Faculty 
from the list of post-graduate studies; and shall pass a thorough 
examination upon that course, showing in one of the subjects 
special attainments, and shall present a satisfactory thesis. 

s. The Faculty will recommend for the degree of Master of 
Scientific Agriculture, candidates otherwise qualified, who, after 
taking their Bachelor's degree, shall reside at the College for at 



48 Iowa Agricultural College. 

least one year, and pursue, during that time a course of agricul- 
tural and scientific study embracing at least two subjects selected 
with the approval of the Special Faculty from the subjoined list of 
post-graduate studies; and shall pass a thorough examination upon 
that course, showing in one of the subjects special attainments, 
and shall present a satisfactory thesis. 

9. The Faculty will recommend for the degree of Mechanical 
Engineer, candidates otherwise qualified, who, after taking their 
Bachelor's degree, shall reside at the College for at least one year, 
and pursue during that time a course of study in Mechanical 
Engineering, and at least one additional subject, selected with the 
approval of the Faculty, from the subjoined list of post-graduate 
studies; and shall pass a thorough examination upon that course 
showing in one of the subjects special attainments, and shall also 
present a satisfactory thesis. 

10. The Faculty will recommend for the degree of Civil Engin- 
eer, candidates otherwise qualified, who, alter taking their Bach- 
elor's degree, shall reside at the College for at least one year, and 
pursue during that time a course of study in Civil Engineering, 
and at least one additional subject, selected with the approval of 
the Faculty, from the subjoined list of post-graduate studies; and 
shall pass a thorough examination upon that course showing in one 
of the subjects special attainments, and shall also present a satis- 
factory thesis. 

11. The Faculty will recommend for the degree of Doctor of 
Veterinary Medicine, candidates otherwise qualified who, after 
taking their Bachelor's degree, shall reside at the College for at 
least one year, and pursue during that time a course of study 
including at least two approved subjects in Veterinary Science, 
under the direction of the special Faculty of the Veterinary school; 
and shall pass a thorough examination upon that course, and shall 
also present a satisfactory thesis. 

12. The Faculty will recommend for the degree of Master of 
Philosophy, candidates otherwise qualified, who, after taking their 
Bachelor's degree, shall reside at the College for at least one year, 
and. pursue during that time a course of study embracing at least 
two studies selected with the approval of the Faculty, of which 
Science of Language, Psychology, Social Science, or Higher Mathe- 
matics shall constitute the principal subject; and shall pass a 
thorough examination upon that course, showing in the principal 
subject chosen special attainments, and shall also present a satis- 
factory thesis. 



Iowa Agricultural Gollegi . 19 

18. These degrees may be respective^ conferred upon Bachel- 
ors of Science, Bachelors of Scientific Agriculture, Bachelors of 
Mechanical Engineering, Bachelors of Civil Engineering, and 
Bachelors of Veterinary .Medicine, graduates of this College who 
have not resided here since graduation, who at a date not earlier 
than three years after graduation shall pass a thorough examina- 
tion and present a thesis, as in case of residence. 

14. Every resident graduate must apply in writing for examin- 
ation at least six weeks previous to the annual meeting of the 
Board of Trustees, stating explicitly the studies in which lie 
desires to be examined, and, at the time of examination, (which 
may be four weeks previous to the meeting of the Board,) lie must 
present to the Faculty, his final thesis. 

15. Every non-resident candidate must notify the Faculty of 
his candidature in writing, at least six months previous to the 
annual meeting of the Board of of Trustees, stating explicity his 
present qualifications, and the course of study which he intends to 
offer; he must, also, six weeks previous to the annual meeting of 
of the the Board, apply in writing for examination, stating explic- 
itly the studies in which he desires to be examined, and at the 
time of examination, (which may be four weeks previous to the 
meeting of the Board.) he must present to the Faculty his final 
thesis. 

16. The graduating fee is two dollars. 



POST GRADUATE STUDIES. 

Instruction and opportunities for study are given in the fol- 
lowing branches to post-graduate students: 

1 — Psychology. 2 — The Philosophy of Science. 3— Social 
Science. 4— The English Literature of the Elizabethan Period. 
&— Science of Language. 6— Physiological Botany . 7— Systematic 
Botany. 8— Special Zoology. 9— Original Designs of Engineering 
Structures. 10— Veterinary Pathology and Materia Medica. 
11— Principles of Breeding. 12— Applied Mechanics. 18— Agri- 
cultural and Organic Chemistry . 14— Advanced Physics . 1-5— An- 
alytical Geometry and Calculus. 16— Horticulture and Forestry. 
17— Agriculture. 



50 Iowa Agricultural College. 

MEANS AND METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. 

This school has been organized as one of the divisions of col- 
lege work, to meet the wants of such pupils as desire an extended 
course in the sciences which underlie Agriculture, with special 
reference to their practical application in the diversified indus- 
tries of the farm. Particular attention is paid to the problem of 
economical production and to the reduction of farm improvement 
and management to a science which shall eliminate, as far as prac- 
ticable, elements of uncertainty, and foster well defined principles 
of assured success. In this special line of instruction it is the pur- 
pose to evolve the science in agriculture as distinct from pure 
skill and from the sciences relating to agriculture. This course 
includes four year's of college work, and for breadth and thorough- 
ness of instruction is in every way equal to the other courses 
offered the student. The distinctive work of the school is divided 
into two departments. Agriculture and Horticulture. 

AGRICULTURE. 

During the first term, Freshman year, the descriptive zoology of 
our domestic animals is taught two days per week, with lessons 
upon the management of stock and its comparative value for the 
farm. Full illustrations of this branch can be found in the large 
variety of grade and thoroughbred stock on the College farm. 

In the second term, instruction in the Dairy is given three 
days per week, during which the following topics are discussed in 
a practical way: Essential Points of the Dairy Tow; the best 
Breeds and Crosses; Food and Management; Milk, its constituents 
and. Tts Value for Food; Practical Dairying; The Manufacture of 
Butter and Cheese by the Most approved Methods. To illustrate 
and demonstrate the various problems, there is upon the farm a 
daiiy of seventy cows, composed of pure Shorthorns, Ilolsteins 
and Jerseys, and grades of the same breeds. The dairy barn is 
ample for eighty cows, and with facilities for storing food and 
making experiments upon a corresponding scale. The Cream- 
ery is a substantial structure, with a full supply of improved ap- 
paratus. 

The auxiliary studies pursuod during the Freshman year are 
Algebra, Geometry, Rhetoric, Botany. Zoology. Book-keeping, 
Drawing and Composition. 



Towa Agricultural College. 51 

During the Sophomore year the supporting studies. Botany, 
Chemistry, Zoology, Physics and Mathematics are pursued. In 
the second term Stock-B reeding is taught, three lessons per 
week, and a course of lectures is given upon the laws of heredity 

and their application in the breeding of farm stock. 

It is believed thai few institutions possess such complete facili- 
ties for illustration in this department as can.be found in the thor- 
oughly systematic divisions of improved stock, horses, cattle, 
sheep and swine, upon the College farm. 

In the Junior year first term a very important course of lectures 
will be given upon Fa km Economy, including detailed plans and 
methods of farm investment and improvement, the limit of 
profitable expenditures in buildings, fences and labor, the prob- 
lems of increasing the ratio of income to the investment, etc.; and 
in the second term "How Plants Feed and Grow," will be taught, 
with particular reference to our peculiar soil and climate. During 
the year the relating studies. Physics, Vegetable Physiology, Land- 
scape Gardening and Farm Engineering will be pursued; also the 
following general branches. English Literature, Political Economy 
and Commercial Law. 

The special studies pursued in the Senior year are Experimental 
Agriculture, Agricultural Chemistry, Veterinary Science and 
lectures on food, which cover a domain of knowledge of great 
practical value . They enable the student to understand soils, 
cereals, grasses, fertilizers, improved machinery and methods of 
cultivation; the anatomy, physiology and food of the domestic 
animals. These intensely practical blanches are balanced by the 
study of Geology, Mineralogy, Psychology and the Philosophy of 
Science. 

HORTICULTURE AND FORESTRY. 

These studies form a part of the regular course in Agriculture. 
singly and alone the time allotted to this technical line of study 
and practice could accomplish little more than to make the student 
familiar with some of the leading modes and methods of empirical 
gardening, considered mainly as a mere art. Supported, however 
by the full course in natural sciences, the routine of Horticultural 
operations rises above the level of unreasoning custom to the 
rank of applied science. The cultivated plant becomes a thing of 
life, varied in vitality, habit of growth, and fruitfulness by condi- 
tions of soil and air more or less under control. 

The course begins with the second term of the Freshman year. 
No text book will be used. Instruction will be imparted by seas- 



52 Iowa Agricultural College. 

onable lectures on the elementary principles of propagation and 
management of trees, shrubs and plants in garden and field, with 
object lessons and practice. In connection the lectures of Prof . 
Bessey, on Elementary Botany and Vegetable Physiology will 
prove important aids. 

The studies of the Sophomore year, second term, in Botany. 
Vegetable Anatomy, Chemistry. Physics, Entomology. et<\. lit the 
class in the first term of* the Junior year for the intelligent con- 
sideration of the varied topics presented in Barry's Fruit Garden, 
as modified by our peculiar conditions of soil and air. The lessons 
of* the first term will be supported by studies in vegetable anatomy, 
practice in Botanical Laboratory, and Physics. During the second 
term the general principles of Forestry will be taken up. Fuller's 
treatise will be used as a textbook so far as it is applicable . to 
prairie conditions. The concluding lectures on theoretical Horti- 
culture, supported by auxiliary studies, will enable the student to 
comprehend important principles pertaining to vital force, germi- 
nation, root and stem growth, leaf formation and function, cli- 
matic adaptation, etc.; intimately associated in our climate with 
perfect failure or varied degrees of success in all Horticultural 
operations. 

THE MEANS FOR PRACTICAL ILLUSTRATION. 

1. The Extensive Vegetable Gardens. 

2. The Extended and Varied Flower Borders. 
:\. The Ornamental Grounds. 

4. The Experimental Nurseries. 

5. The Experimental Orchards. 
(>. The Small-fruit Plantations. 

7. The Forestry Plantations. 

8. The Propagating Rooms. 

!). The Propagating Pits Under Glass. 

10. The Collection of Native and Cultivated Woods. 

11. The Collection of Injurious and Beneficial Insects. 

12. The Sets of Abnormal and Diseased Growths. 

13. A Set of lac-simile Fruit Casts. 

14. The Horticultural Museum now accumulating. 
LABOR.— To illustrate each branch and enable the student to 

become familiar with methods and processes, and acquire some 
skill, he is expected to engage in such labor as will best promote a 
knowledge of the particular study in hand, from one to four hours 
each day, according to the work assigned. The usual compensa- 
tion will be allowed for the time employed. 



Iowa Agricultural Collegt : » :; 

THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING. 

This school includes the two departments of Mechanical Engin- 
eering, and Civil Engineering, each provided with a complete 
course of study. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

In the Freshman year the course of study is the same as the 
Course in the Sciences Related to the Industries, except Practice 
in the Workshop and the study of Drawing, and Workshop Tools 
and Appliances; the former occupies three forenoons of two and a 
half hours each, per week, the latter one hour two afternoons per 
week. The workshop practice is of a general character; it is not 
pursued with a view to any particular trade or calling. Each student 
is required to make a complete set of elementary forms, and to 
execute a series of problems which will give a general training and 
at the same time enable him to produce that excellence of finish 
and correct fitting which is required in modern workmanship. In 
the Sophomore year Plane Trigonometry, Land Surveying, Mathe- 
matics, Physics and Chemistry constitute the leading studies, prac- 
tice in the Chemical Laboratory taking the place of that in the 
workshop. 

The studies in the Junior year are in the line of the profession; 
Principles of Mechanism, Analytical Mechanics and the Resistance 
of Materials occupy rive recitations per week; throughout the 
entire year, lectures and experimental work, are added as the class 
advances in the different nubjects. The student determines from 
experiments the laws and co-efficient of elasticity and the modulus 
of strength of different materials. The work in the Mechanical 
Laboratory for this year is chosen. Having in view, its usefulness to 
the Mechanical Engineer. 

In the Senior year the study of prime movers and thermo-dy- 
namics occupy the greater part of the time: the Steam Engine by 
Rankine is used as a text book. For the purpose of making tests 
in this subject a fifteen-horse power, Harris Corliss Engine has a 
Richard's Indicator fitted to it; a four-horse power slide-valve 
engine has also the Indicator, a friction brake, and calorimeters 
fitted to it. A given amount of fuel is placed in the hands of the 
student, he making all the tests and determining the efficiency of 
the furnace and engine. During this year at least one original de- 
sign of some machine must be made, with complete working draw- 
ings in detail, and at least one complete drawing furnished in line 
Shading and one in water colors. 



.")4 Iowa Agricultural Collegt 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The basis of this course of study is laid by a systematic drill in 
Algebra and Geometry during the Freshman year. In the Sopho- 
more year, first term. Plain 1 Trigonometry and Land Surveying are 
taught in the class room, and the latter is supplemented by work 
in the held where the student becomes acquainted with all the 
manual portions of the business, and acquires proficiency in the 
use of the chain, compass, transit, and other instruments. Notes 
are kept of the data taken as in actual work and from these the 
aieas calculated and the fields platted. In the second term 
Descriptive Geometry, Spherical Trigonometry, and Analytical 
Geometry are begun and the latter finished, having live recitations 
per week during the whole term. In the former three recitations 
or lectures per week are given during the first twelve weeks, in 
addition to which the student prepares twenty plates of drawings, 
each consisting of some special graphical problem which involves 
one or more of the general problems of Descriptive Geometry. By 
this means Mechanical Drawing is practiced at the same time that 
its underlying scienct is studied. Spherical Trigonometry occu- 
pies three exercises per week during the last six weeks ot 
the term. In this year t lie course becomes more strictly technical. 
During the last term the various methods of laying out railway 
curves, putting in switches and side tracks, and setting slope 
stakes, are taught. As nearly as possible all the problems investi- 
gated in the class room are taken into the field and staked out upon 
the ground. Data are also taken for problems in earth work, both 
excavation and embankment, and the cubic contents calculated. 

In the Junior year Calculus is taught during the first term, there 
being live recitations per week. Descriptive (Jeomety is 

continued in much the same manner as before, only dealing with 
the higher problems of Stereotomy, Shades. Shadows and Perspec- 
tive, and Isometric Drawing. About twenty plates of drawings 
are prepared. The subject of Docks and Retaining walls occupies 
the first nine weeks of this term. 

In the second term, Analytical Mechanics and the Strength of 
Materials occupy live recitations per week. During this term 
also, a practice survey of a portion of a line of railway is under- 
taken and the engineering of the work carried as far as is possible 
without the actual construction. The line is run, the curyes put 
in, the profile taken, the grades determined upon, and then it is 
cross-sectioned and left ready for the contractor. The notes of 
the work are kepi exactly as in actual practice, and from them a 



Towa Agricultural ( 'ollegi 55 

profile and plan arc drawn. Including the more important topo- 
graphical features of the adjoining lands. 

Duringthe first term of the Senior year the subjectof Bridge and 
Hoot' Structures is taken up and continued during the entire year, 
there being five recitations per week during both terms. In con- 
nection with the recitations', each student is required to make a 
detailed drawing of some iron bridge in the vicinity of the College, 
and. also, to make detailed drawings of two or three original de- 
signs for bridge structures. Daring the second term the study of 
bridge work, including trestles, cattle guards, turn tables, etc., is 
continued. Sanitary Engineering is taught the last eight weeks 
of the term with five recitations per week. Astronomy, as 
relating to the determining of meridians, latitudes, longitudes, 
local times, etc.. occupies two recitations per week for the entire 
term. The general subject of Contracts Specifications, Relations 
of the Engineer to the Contractor, etc., are now considered. In 
all studies connected with civil Engineering it is the aim of the 
department to give a thoroughly practical as well as theoretical 
knowledge of the subjects taught and to fit the student for imme- 
diate entrance upon the duties of an engineer. 

Many of the problems involved can be but imperfectly taught 
by text books alone, and to be fully mastered, must be solved in 
the field. However well the student may have understood the 
theoretical solution of such a problem as the laying out of a railway 
curve, he will be puzzled to know what to do first, when he sets up 
his transit and attempts to apply his knowledge. In land survey- 
ing, for instance, the lands to be measured are not smooth, poly- 
gonal planes, such as are represented on paper, but hillsides and 
valleys, covered in many cases by trees and bushes, and intersected 
by streams and morasses, with, borders frequently formed by the 
irregular shore of a river or lake. These are the actual problems 
which the student must meet, and they can only be solved where 
they are found— on the ground. 

But this is not all. For the purpose of education, something 
more is required than simply the knowledge of how to do things: 
the principles upon which the operations are based, the reasons 
for the various processes involved, and even the theoretical solu- 
tion of the ideal problem which is never found in nature, are all 
of the highest value, and should never be omitted from a scheme 
of technical education. 



Iowa Agricultural College. 



THE SCHOOL OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

It is the purpose of this school to train students for practice in 
the veterinary specialty of medicine. The vast proportions of the 
stock interest in the West, the enormous losses that are being sus- 
tained from sporadic and contagious forms of disease among domes- 
tic animals, and the low standard of veterinary knowledge exist- 
ing throughout the country, rendered the establishment of such a 
school an imperative necessity. There is a wide and increasing 
demand for thoroughly trained veterinary practitioners, and no 
field for the exercise of skill and ability has been left so entiiely 
unoccupied or offers stronger inducements. 

The want of proper facilities for study in this department of 
medical science has necessarily kept the profession far below the 
position it occupies in European countries. But the extent to 
which some of our important material interests are threatened by 
epizootic diseases, has awakened public sentiment to the impor- 
tance of providing for that sort of instruction that shall be of value 
in the prevention and treatment of such diseases. A course of 
study has been adopted that is in no way inferior to those of the 
best English or American Colleges. The departments of instruc- 
tion are well provided for and the facilities are good. These will 
be especially referred to under the several departments. 

Anatomy of Domestic Animals.— In this course the anatomy 
of the horse will be the special object of study, but important 
structural differences of other domestic animals will be carefully 
noted. The lectures on anatomy will be illustrated by means of 
plates, models, skeletons, and prepared specimens of all the organs. 
A convenient and well-furnished dissecting-room affords the stu- 
dent every facility for this important part Of anatomical work. 
All dissections will be personally superintended by the Professor 
in charge, or by the demonstrator; and each student will be re- 
quired to make a prescribed number of dissections before he can 
he eligible for final examination. The course will include one 
lecture each day during the Junior year. 

Zoology and Comparative Anatomy.— In the. Junior year 
there are, in the first term, two recitations per week in Zoology, 
dealing exclusively with [nvertebrata. During this time the stu- 
dent spends one forenoon each week in the laboratory in the dis- 
ced ion nl' t \ pical forms. In the second term there are four recita- 
tions or lectures per week upon General Comparative Anatomy. 



Towa Agricultural College. 57 

Histology and Physiology.- This course embraces. 1st.— 
Systematic Histology. This section deals with the minute 
anatomy of the animal tissues, and is taught systematically by 
lectures throughout the first term of the Senior year. 2d.— PRAC- 
TICAL EIlSTOLOGY. This includes the practical study of the vari- 
ous tissues of the animal bodj by the aid at' the microscope. The 
various methods of preparing tissues for microscopic examination 
are taught with the object of familiarizing the eye of the student 
with the minute anatomy of all the tissues of the animal body. 
This study is prosecuted bj the student under the immediate 
supervision of the Professor. The entire course in Histology in- 
cludes about eighty lectures, with six hours laboratory work per 
week. The facilities in this department are excellent. The labo- 
ratory is a large, well-lighted room supplied with a large number 
of histological microscopes of the most approved stands, furnished 
with first-class objectives. There are also large stands with high 
powers for the more difficult work and for comparison. 

Physiology is taken up in the first term of the second year and 
is taught by lectures, recitations and demonstrations. Physiology 
is carried along with Microscopical Anatomy to which it bears a 
close relation. This course includes about sixty lectures. Labo- 
ratory facilities are offered students who desire to engage in orig- 
nal work. 

General Comparative Pathology, Pathological Anat- 
omy and Histology— embrace: 1st. The study of the Pathology of 
the epizootic and general diseases of cattle, horses, sheep, pigs, 
dogs, and other domestic animals; the natural history and peculiar- 
ities of parasites with the affections to which they give rise, and 
the means to be adopted in preventing and destroying them. 2d. 
Pathological Anatomy and Histology. This course is full and 
complete. Pathological specimens of all kinds are brought before 
the class for the purpose of familiarizing the student with the ap- 
pearance of diseased tissues. The relations of Pathological His- 
tology to the principles of medicine and surgery [ are carefully 
treated of. and the advances made in the application of the micro- 
scope to exact pathology fully considered. The use of the micro- 
scope in the study of pathological specimens form an important 
part of the laboratory work during the last term of the Senior year. 
The course in Pathology includes about eighty lectures. 

Instruction in Botany — extends through one year, the stu- 
dent devoting two exercises per week to this study during that 
time. In the fall term of his first year the student acquaints him- 



58 Iowa Agricultural College 

self with general Botany, and gives some attention to the identifi- 
cation of plants, and for that purpose lie joins the class in Elemen- 
tary Botany in the regular college course. 

In the spring term of his second year the student lakes up Med- 
ical Botany in which the origin and preparation of medicines de- 
rived from the vegetable kingdom are discussed and dwelt upon, 
and by means of carefully selected specimens, the student is made 
thoroughly familiar with their appearance. 

During the course each student makes and preserves a collec- 
tion of dried specimens of plants, and in this work he is required 
to devote particular attention to the native and cultivated plants 
which are of importance to the Veterinarian. 

Chemistry.— General Chemistry embraces manipulating chem- 
ical apparatus, handling and making gases, studying the properties 
of different chemical elements and their compounds. Tn Qualita- 
tive Analysis, the students receive chemicals, minerals, etc., and 
determine the elements of which they are composed. The course 
is very thorough and no student can go into the Senior year who is 
unable to analyze correctly inorganic substances. Writing chem- 
ical reactions and solving problems form an interesting part of the 
class work. There are three recitations a week during the first 
term, two in the second, and laboratory work two afternoons a 
week during each term. 

In the Senior year students commence to analyze quantitatively, 
pure chemicals, and, as soon as they haye acquired sufficient skill, 
lake up physiolygical work. This includes the detection of pois- 
ons; analysis of urine from healthy and diseased animals; exami- 
nations of food, including water; qualitative and quantitative anal- 
yses of the secretions in, and excretions from the body; together 
with such work as the clinical department may require. Students- 
will also compound or make medicines required by the school. 
Dining the second term original work is required. Recitations 
occur twice a week during the year, laboratory work three after- 
noons dining the first term and two in the second. 

Therapeutics.— The physiological and therapeutical value of 
medicines used in Veterinary practice, their propelties, uses and 
doses, are carefully considered throughout the Senior year, and 
include about one hundred lectures. 

Veterinary Medicine and Surgery.— This course em- 
braces theoretical and practical instruction in the treatment of 
diseases to which all domestic animals are subject, as well as the 
theory anil practice of surgery. The lectures are illustrated from 



Towa Agricultural College. 59 

a valuable collection of specimens illustrative of the morbid anatomy 
as <ic\ eloped by a wide range of diseases. The students have the 
benefit of assisting in a large practice, and thoseof the Senior class 
arc made familiar with the use of instruments and the administra- 
tion of medicines. Several hundreds of animals, including horses, 
cattle, swine and sheep are kept on the College Farm, a large por- 
tion of which is breeding stock. Frequent inspection of these 
llocks and herds affords the student most valuable opportunities 
for observing sanitary condit ons, and gaining experience in 
obstetrical practice. The course includes about one hundred and 
eighty lectures. A collateral course of reading, embracing some 
of the best approved English works on the subjects taught is re- 
quired. 

Clinics.— One half day each week is devoted to the clinics held 
at the College hospital. The advanced students are required to 
examine animals for certificates of soundness, diagnose diseases, 
and prescribe for the same. Hundreds of animals are presented at 
these examinations, for which medical or surgical advice is requir- 
ed ; the student must exercise judgment as to the course of treat- 
ment to be pursued in these widely differing forms of disease. 

CONDITQNS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission must be at least sixteen years of age. 
Before entering the classes they must pass an examination in 
Reading. Orthography, Geography, English Grammar and Arith- 
metic. 

LENGTH OF COURSE. 

The course occupies two years. Sessions begin the first of 
March and continue to the middle of November with a vacation 
of two weeks in July. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

At the (dose of each term, examinations are given on the sub- 
jects taught during the term. These examinations are final, with 
the exception of the following subjects: viz.. Anatomy, Materia 
Medica, Therapeutics, and Veterinary Medicine and Surgery. On 
the last named branches the student must pass a final examination 
at the end of his course. The method of examination is largely 
under the control of the Professor in charge, but in every case is 
such as to give ample proof as to the efficiency of the candidate. 
GRADUATION AN'I) DEGREES. 

Candidates for graduation must be eighteen years of age; must 
have completed the entire course of study, and attained a standing 



60 



Iowa Agricultural College 



of seventy-live per cent in all the studies pursued. Every candi- 
date for graduation must present an acceptable thesis upon some 
subject approved by the Faculty. The degree of Bachelor of Vet- 
erinary Medicine is conferred upon the graduates of this course. 

Graduates of the Course in the Sciences Related to the Indus- 
tries upon completing satisfactorily all the Studies and work in the 
Veterinary course will be entitled to the degree of Doctor of Vet- 
erinary Medicine. 

.V graduating fee of two dollars is required. 



FIRST OIR, TTTnNTIOIR, "STIE^IR,. 

FIRST TERM. 



Materia Med- 
ica, TU. TH. 



9—10 

Anatomy of 
Domestic Ani- 
mals— 5. 



10—11 



Zoology, w. f. 



11—12 



Chemistry, m. 
w. F. 



SECOND TKUM. 



Materia Medica 

TU. TH. 



Com p. A n at. 

TU. W. TH. P. 

Chemistry, tu 

TH. 



Botany, tu.th. 



SECOND OR SEITIOB YIE^R. 



8— H 



n— io 



Medicine and 
Surgery, m. w. v. 
Chemistry :m<l 
Toxicologj', tu. 

TH. 



FIRST TERM. 



10-11 



Medical Hotany. 

\i. vv. 

Therapeutics, 

TU. Til. 



IECOND TERM. 



Histology 



Iowa Agricultural ( blkge. ,; i 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

Some changes have been made in the course in Domestic Econ. 
omy for the future. One division of young ladies from the Fresh- 
man class will, hereafter, practice in the experimental kitchen, 
from ten to twelve every morning, helping to get dinner for the 
students. Each member of the class will thus give two hours a 
week to the study of Domestic Economy. In this way it is expect- 
ed they will learn to prepare plain food in an economical, skillful 
and appetizing manner. 

The Sophomore class will receive one lecture a week on subjects 
connected with household management, tin 1 preservation of health, 
care of the sick, etc. 

The Juniors will, as heretofore, practice two afternoons a week 
in the experimental kitchen, in South Hall, receiving instruction 
in the more difficult operations of the culinary art. 

MILITAEY SCIENCE. 

Lectures on .Military subjects are delivered throughout the 
course, and regular military drill takes place every Wednesday 
afternoon, follows : 

First year, first term,— School of the Soldier; second term,— 
School of the Company. Second year, first term,— School of the 
Battalion; second term,— Field Artillery Drill. Third year, first 
term, — Broad-Sword Exercise and Artillery Drill; second term, — 
Small-Sword Exercise. Fourth year, first term, — Cavalry Drill and 
Small-Sword Exercise. 

All male students of the College, except such as may be excus- 
ed by proper authority, are required to wear the prescribed uni- 
form, attend all military exercises, and become members of the 
College Battalion. The College uniform is made of good service- 
able cloth and is furnished at cost, the price not exceeding four- 
teen dollars. 



62 Iowa Agricultural College. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Algebra. — In Algebra there are two divisions. The first of 
these is composed of students who show by their entrance exami- 
nations thoroughness in Arithmetic and a ready familiarity with 
the principles of Algebra through Equations of the First Degree; 
the other includes all students obtaining a high standing in Arith- 
metic and passing the required examination in Algebra, but show- 
ing in this latter study a want of thoroughness. Particular atten- 
tion is given in this study to the explanation of the cardinal prin- 
ciples, and the drill in the solution of problems and equations is 
conducted with reference to fixing these principles in the minds 
of the students. The first division completes the subject in four- 
teen weeks; the other devotes to its study the entire term. 

Geometry.— All students seeming a standing of three (four 
being perfect) in either of the divisions in Algebra are permitted 
to enter the class in Geometry. This class is divided into two di- 
visions, corresponding with those in Algebra. The first division 
gives to the study of Plane. Solid and Spherical Geometry the last 
four weeks of the first, and all of the second term of the Freshman 
year, while the other division devotes to the same subject the 
eighteen weeks of the second term. In this class the student is 
early taught the full meaning of a geometrical demonstration, 
lie is warned against learning the proposition by rote; and in 
older that he may not fall into this error, he is, at the end of the 
first book, assigned original theorems, which he is required to 
demonstrate. He is expected not only to thoroughly understand 
each proposition, but to be able to so arrange and present the 
points of the proof as to form a complete and perfect demon- 
stration. 

TRIGONOMETRY. — Instruction is given in this branch during 
the first nine weeks of the Sophomore year. The class is thorough- 
ly drilled in the nature and use of the trigonometrical functions. 

An \.lytical Geometry. — This study is pursued by theSopho- 

niore class during the second term. The course of instruction 
embraces Determinate and Indeterminate Gometry, including a 
full examination of the Conic Sections. The underlying principles 
are brought prominently forward and discussed. The student is 
required to carefully analyze each article, and solve the prob- 
lems connected therewith. To secure thoroughness frequent re- 
views are given. 

CALCULUS. Instruction in Calculus is given during the spring 



Iowa Agricultural College. 63 

term of the Junior year. To enter this class it is necessary that 
the student should have passed the lower mathematical studies of 
the course. In no case can the study be pursued successfully 
without previous drill in Analytical Geometry. Buckingham's 
Calculus is used as a text-book. The abstruse principles of this 
method of mathematical investigation are explained upon the 
theory of rates, rather than upon the theory of infinitesimals. In- 
struction is given by daily recitations and lectures, with a review 
each Friday, of the weeks work. Twelve week's are devoted to 
Integral, and the remainder of the term to Differential Calculus. 

PHYSICS. 

The study of Physics commences with the Sophomore year and 
extends through the Junior year. The following is an outline of 
the course of study pursued: In the Sophomore year, first term, 
lectures are given on Mechanics, the laws of motion, hydrostatics, 
specific gravity, pneumatics and kindred topics. During the 
Sophomore year, second term. Acoustics, including the physical 
theory of music. Light, theories of light, mirrors, lenses, optical 
instruments, double retraction and polarization of light are studied. 
In the Junior year, first term, Heat, .Measurement of temperatures, 
measurement of heat constants, radiant heat, calorimetry, the 
steam engine, mechanical equivalent of heat, energy, kinetic and 
potential energy, work, are the principal topics taught. For the 
Junior year, second term. Magnetism, Electricity and Meteorology 
are studied. During this term all the topics usually taught under 
these heads are consided and also a brief course of lectures given 
on the conservation of energy, correlation of forces, dissipation of 
energy, theory of mechanics, and other similar subjects. 

The Physical Laboratory is supplied with an excellent lecture 
room furnished with all modern appliances, such as gas and water 
which are so necessary in similai buildings. Rooms are also fitted 
up for accommodation of students who desire to do special work 
in experimental physics. The course of study is conducted by 
means of lectures and the text-book combined, illustrated by 
numerous experiments throughout the course. The cabinet of phil- 
osophical apparatus is one of the most complete in the West. Its 
cost was originally nearly six thousand dollars, and yearly appro- 
priations continually add to its efficiency and value. During the 
past year a large Dynamo- Electric Machine for producing power- 
ful electric currents was purchased for the Department of Physics. 
This machine can be used for producing the electric light, or as 



64 Iowa Agricultural College. 

an electric motor for driving machinery, and in fact for illustrating 
in a striking manner all the effects and uses of Electricitv An 
electric engine was made in the College Workshops, of sufficient 
power to drive sewing machines and other pieces of light appa- 
ratus. This engine was planned and constructed by a post-grad- 
uate student in Physics. The unabridged edition of Ganot's 
Physics is used as a text book. 

ADVANCED COURSE IX PHYSICS. 

An advanced course is provided for those students who desire 
it. They are expected to have previously passed satisfactorily the 
mathematics included in the course in "Mathematics and Physics." 
This advanced course occupies the Senior year. A course of lec- 
tures is given on the methods of physical investigation. Advance 
problems in Gravitation, Hydrostatics, and Optics are discussed 
during the first term. Advanced work in Magnetism and Electric- 
ity occupies the second term in which the student acquaints him- 
self with all the modern applications of Electricity which are of 
such enormous practical utility. Great pains are taken to give the 
work a practical bearing and therefore the student is required to 
become familiar with batteries and Electric Machines. Labora- 
tory work is required at least two full afternoons each week 
through the year. The Laboratory has an excellent galvanometer, 
and set of resistance coils so that good work can be done in the way 
of electrical measurements. 

Post Graduates.— Young men who have completed a course 
of general scientific study and desire to study specially any of the 
branches of Physics are invited to avail themselves of the facilities 
offered here. Particularly in Magnetism and Electricity, the 
Physical Cabinet is well supplied with apparatus for assisting 
students who desire to lender themselves more proficient in these 
branches. An advanced degree is offered those who pursue suc- 
cessfully for one year, the study of Physics in connection with 
some other kindred studv. 



Iowa Agricultural College. <;~) 

CHEMISTRY. 

The General Chemistry of the first term of the Sophomore year 
embraces manipulating chemical apparatus, handling and making 
gases, studying the properties of different chemical elements and 
rtieir compounds. In the Qualitative Analysis of the second term 
i>t the Sophomore year the student receives chemicals, minerals, 
etc.. to determine the elements oi' which they are composed. The 
course is very thorough, and no student can go on to the Junior 
year who is unable to analyze correctly inorganic substances. 
Writing chemical reactions and solving problems form an import- 
ant part of the class work. Three recitations a week are held in 
the first term and two in the second,— laboratory work two after- 
noons a week during the year. 

In the Junior year the student commences by analyzing quanti- 
tatively pure chemicals, and as soon as he lias acquired sufficient 
skill analyzes paints, alloys, minerals, cast iron, water, etc. The 
second term" s work in the laboratory is a continuation of the first, 
ami includes also, organic analyses embracing such substances as 
hay, milk, uric acid, sugar, etc. The class work in the first term 
consists principally in working out methods of analyses suitable 
for compounds whose composition is giyen. During the second 
term organic chemistry is studied. Two afternoons a week are 
required for laboratory work during the first term, but the lab- 
oratory is open during the whole day, and as each student has a 
separate desk he can spend as much extra time in the laboratory 
as his other studies permit. 

In the second term of the year a course of lectures on Domestic 
Chemistry is delivered to the young women of the Junior class. 

In the Senior year, first term, lectures are given on Agricultural 
Chemistry, embracing such topics as chemistry of soils and 
plants, manures, forces, etc.; second term, on foods for domestic, 
animals. 

The laboratories cover a space of forty-five hundred square feet, 
and have one hundred desks furnished with water and gas; those 
in the quantitative laboratory have filter pumps on each. The 
facilities for instruction in this department are unexcelled in the 
State and include in addition to the ordinary apparatus for analy- 
sis, scales, combustion furnaces, microscope, spectroscope, etc. 

The- text-books used in the Sophomore year are Cook's Chem- 
ical Philosophy. Snively's Tables for Systematic Qualitative 
Analysis; Junior year. Fresellius , Quantitative Analysis, Bloxam's 
Chemistry. Organic and Inorganic. 



66 Iowa Agricultural College. 

BIOLOGY. 

Botany.— All students in the second term of the Freshman 
year begin the study of Elementary Botany. By means of lectures 
twice a week, with illustrations from fresh specimens, the student 
easily masters all the more important facts relating to the general 
or gross anatomy of plants. 

During the first term of the Sophomore year, the students in all 
the departments pursue the study of Systematic Botany. They are 
expected to analyze and classify a sufficient number of plants so as 
to familiarize themselves with the more important orders, and the 
principles of classification. 

The higher course in Botany begins in the second term of the 
Sophomore year with the practical study of Vegetable Anatomy, 
the student spending one afternoon each week in the microscopical 
laboratory, and reciting twice a week from the text book. This is 
continued with the addition of Vegetable Physiology, for eleven 
weeks in the Junior year. With faithfulness and earnestness on 
the part of the student he cannot fail to obtain in this course a fair 
knowledge of the structure and mode of growth and nutrition of 
plants, as understood by modern vegetable physiologists. The 
student is also made familiar with the structure, modes of growth 
and nutrition, and the general classification of the lower orders of 
plants; and the parasitic Fungi are studied and dwelt upon to a 
considerable extent, in accordance with the growing idea of 
their importance in Agriculture, Horticulture, and other indus- 
trial arts. 

Economic Botany occupies the last seven weeks of the Junior 
year. The origin, history and relationship of cultivated plants 
together with a discussion of the value and relative importance of 
the timber trees of the world are taken up by text books and lec- 
tures. The weeds of the farm and garden, with suggestions as to 
their eradication, are discussed at some length, and the rudiments 
of Medical Botany are introduced as occasion demands. 

Collections of botanical specimens are made by the student 
throughout the course in Botany, and submitted, from time to 
time, for examination. 

The means of investigation are: (1 ) the College Herbarium; (2) 
a collection of billets of various kinds of woods; (3) a collection of 
grasses; (4) a collection of cones of evergreens; (5) a set of dia- 
grams and charts; (6) eleven compound microscopes (with Ilart- 
nack's, Tolles', and Beck's objectives); (7) alcoholic and drv ma- 
terial for examination in the laboratory; (8) students also have 



Towa Agricultural College. 67 

access t«» the collection of mosses, lichens, and fungi belonging to 

the professor. 

Zoology. This science is begun in the second term of the 
Freshman year bj the study o\' Descriptive Zoology in which are 
discussed the external form, outward relation, and geographical 
distribution of the various members o\' the animal kingdom. In 
the first term of the Sophomore year the subject of Invertebrate; 
Zoolog) is taken up. including the principles of classification and 
the true relations of the different portions of the animal creation. 
The second term of this year is devoted to a special consideration 
of Vertebrated animals, more particularly those which possess an 
economic interest. The last half of the term is occupied with the 
subject of Entomology, special attention being paid to those 
insects which have proved injurious to the farmer and gardener. 
Their life-history, as far as known, is examined and the various 
remedies and cbecks that have been found efficacious are sug- 
gested. In addition to the class-room work of this year, each stu- 
dent is required to collect, prepare and identity a certain number 
of specimens which are then deposited in the museum. During the 
last term of the year, the student spends one afternoon for three 
hours) of each week in the study and identification of specimens 
in the laboratory. 

During the first term of the Junior year the student spends one 
afternoon of each week in the laboratory in the dissection and 
study of typical forms of the animal phyla. 

In the second term of the Junior year the study of Comparative 
Anatom> is taken up in a course of lectures extending through the 
whole term. The general and special facts of Biology and the 
anatomical structures of the various organisms, are disensed with 
as much minuteness of detail as the time will admit, followed by a 
resume of the subject, in which the evolution of the different sys- 
tems of organs is traced from their earliest beginnings to their 
most differentiated forms. The whole is supplemented by a short 
course upon Embryolog} m which the development of the ovum is 
traced ami compared with those forms already discussed. 

The Zoological Museum occupies a large room on the third floor 
of the south wing of the main building. It includes mounted 
specimens of a few mammals, several hundred birds (mounted), 
representing the avian fauna of the state, a large collection of 
reptiles, in alcohol, a few fishes and a small but typical collection 
<»f invertebrates. A set of the " Ward Models," illustrating the 
principal larger fossils is of service in this study as well as in Geol- 



68 Iowa Agricultural College. 

ogy. There are, besides, the following- collections in process of 
formation: An entomological cabinet, sets of the eggs and nests of 
birds, the brains of vertebrates, skulls of mammals, and skeletons 
of vertebrates. 

During the second term of the College year, the museum room 
is used as a laboratory, in which the students in Zoology make a 
direct study of the specimens. Tables and chairs enough to ac- 
commodate twenty students at once, are provided, and the room is 
open three afternoons a week for work. 

Visitors are admitted to the mnsenni every afternoon from one 
to five o'clock. 

GEOLOGY. 

Students of the Senior class pursue this subject during the first 
term, using Le Conte"s Elements of Geology as a text book. The 
<dass makes frequent excursions to the quarries near the College, 
in quest of specimens, and each student is required to collect as 
many specimens of minerals and rocks as can be readily found in 
the vicinity. The Geological Museum possesses a good collection 
of the common rocks and minerals to which the student has access. 
Among other advantages for pursuing this study the museum con- 
tains a set of the Ward series of Geological Casts. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

MORAL SCIENCE. {Professor Wynn.) — The Freshman class en- 
gages in the study of Moral Science, reciting three days a week 
during the fall term. Peabody's Moral Science is used, and the 
subject is illustrated by abundant concrete examples. 

Political Economy. [Professor Stanton.) — In this division of 
Social Science are taught, by text-book, familiar lectures and dis- 
cussions, the laws of labor— its products and their cost; the prin- 
ciples of capital, money, foreign trade, tariff, taxation, and all the 
iflnnences that quickeu or retard exchange. The student thus 
gains a thorough acquaintance with the scientific data that under- 
lie and regulate industry. He becomes intelligent, moreover, in 
all questions of public policy respecting which there is such a wide 
diversity of opinion. 

Psychology. {President Welch.) In the study of Psychology 

we aim to avoid all those questions which the discussion, of cen- 
turies has failed to solve, and which consequently have no bearing 
either on human conduct or a knowledge of human nature. The 
object sough! by the student in (his study is to gain a systematic 
acquaintance with the pheomeno of thought, feeling and volition; 



Towa Agricultural ( 'ollege 69 

to get an insight; clear as may be, into the workings of his own 
mind, its modes of action, its limits, its means and order of growth 
from sense to reasoning. No real progress in Psychology can be 
made except through the revelations of consciousness. The stu- 
dent must attain the difficult art of rightly scrutinizing His own 
mental states and modes of thought. Six eseays on topics chosen 
by the Professor are written during the term by each member of 
the class. The facts of Psychology we may add are made the basis 
for the Subsequent stud} of the Philosophy of Science and. 
together with the principles of Biology, are properly preparatory 
to Sociology. The library is well supplied with books of refer- 
ence. 

Philosophy of Science. [President Welch.) — This subject 
which occupies the Senior class the first half of the fall term is 

presented by lectures on the creation and classification of the 
sciences: methods of investigation, observation, experiment, and 
hypothesis; inductive and deductive reasoning; necessary and con- 
tingent truths; regressive reasoning illustrated by Geometry; limits 

of scientific knowledge, etc. 

Sociology. [President Welch.) — The remaining portion of the 
Senior year is given to a rapid survey of the fundamental principles 
of Sociology. This survey will comprise the data of the science, 
namely, the feelings, ideas, and wants of man, the primitive con- 
dition of the human race— its superstitions, erroneous beliefs, and 
the impulses by which savage tribes struggled up into civilized 
nations. A brief account will also be given of the origin and 
growth of government, law. science, religion, industry and ait. 
The object sought is simply ,o lay the foundation for future acqui- 
sitions. 

LITERATURE AXJ) LANGUAGE. 

Rhetoric. [Miss Sinclair.) — In this study the design, is, with 
the aid of the most competent text-book we can find, to require as 
much original work in grammatical purity, principles, choice, and 
use of words, kinds of composition, etc., as the time of the classes 
will pernnt. No pains are spared to illustrate the main excellen- 
lencies of style in the works of the great masters who have writ- 
ten in the mother tongue, and in this way to make this study a 
fitting preparation for English Literature which is to follow. 

EIlSTORY. [Professor Wynn.)—A course in History has been 
planned for the Ladies* course in the Sophomore year, first term. 
The aim is here, instead of running over Universal History in a 



70 Iowa Agricultural College. 

dry text-book fashion, to take hold of some fruitful epoch in the 
ages, and develop it, the student furnishing the result of lier own 
researches along a line of references indicated in the lecture-room. 

English Literature. (Professor Wynn.) — The first term of 
the Junior year is occupied with English Literature proper. As 
there is but one term devoted to this, and it is impossible in so 
brief a space to become familiar with the whole history of the 
English mind, from the days of the Anglo-Saxon Conquest down 
to the present time, a similar method is pursued here as in History 
—some specially productive era being selected, and the student 
required, under the guide of an outline furnished in the lecture- 
room to sum up investigations of his own in the literary, social, 
and religious influences prevailing at that time and giving charac- 
ter to the master-pieces which were then produced. At this stage 
of the student's progress, the library becomes his laboratory, and 
care will be taken that the necessary books of reference will be 
furnished to his hand. 

The Science ok Language. (Professor Wynn.) — This is pur- 
sued by the Seniors in the second term of the year. Here the stu- 
dent, keeping in the main close to some competent text-book, seeks 
to discover the underlying laws of* language, making that subtle 
instrument, which is to be the means of conveying his intellectual 
life and power to his fellows, the object of his study, with the view 
to determining the origin, history, growth, decay, and ethnic rela- 
tions of all the languages on the face of the earth, and settling in 
so far as that may be done, the relation of language to thought. 
As leading out to psychology in one direction, to ethnology in an- 
other, and to comparative mythology in another, it is replete with 
interest, and has a fascination that entitles it to a crowning place 
among the literary studies. 

Latin. [Professor Wynn.)— A one year course in Latin is pro 
vided in the Freshman year. The design is simply to meet the 
practical necessities of the scientific curricula that prevail here. 
A brief preparatory drill introduces the student to Caesar; after- 
reading carefully two books, he enters Vilgil's vKneid and con- 
tinues it to the end of the year. The Roman pronunciation is 
adopted. Allen & GreeilOUgh's text-books are used, and the most 
advanced methods of imparting instruction are diligently sought 
tor and practiced. 

French and German. [Miss Sinclair.) Each of these lan- 
guages is regarded as a means to an end, and not as an end in itself. 
Each is therefore pursued as an ait rather than a science, and con- 



Iowa Agricultural ColUgt, 71 

sequehtlj the natural or empirical method of instruction has a 
more prominent place than the scientific. By combining the two 
methods in this manner, better practical results are obtained than 
would he possible in the same time bj following either method 
exclusively. In the study of either French or German the students 
are expected, from the beginning, to use the language in the class 
room as far as possible. 

The study o\' German has been introduced as optional with 
Latin and Rhetoric in the Freshman year. It is not claimed that 
anything hut a rudimental knowledge of the language can he 
acquired in the allotted time, hut special effort is made to render 
this knowledge practical and to make it the basis for future attain- 
ment. An energetic and persevering student gains by one year's 
thorough application, a knowledge of German, which, though lim- 
ited, may still be of great practical use. Otto's Conversation 
Grammar is used as a text-book during- the first term. 

The course in French occupies the last three terms of the course, 
in Mechanical and Civil Engineering and the Ladies' Course. The 
chief object in view is not an exhaustive and critical knowledge of 
the grammar of the language, but as high a degree of its practical 
masters as is attainable in the time. Much time is therefore given 
to reading in order to familiarize the student with different styles 
of writing, and to give facility in translating. In both French and 
German the much neglected art of understanding the spoken lan- 
guage receives particular attention. For acquiring the necessary 
knowledge of inflections and for reference. Keetel's Collegiate 
French Course is used. 

English Composition, Essays, and Dissertations.— In- 
struction is given in English Composition during the whole of the 
Freshman year. Collect spelling, use of capital letters, punctua- 
tion, etc. are taught by frequent exercises. The Sophomores meet 
once a week tor practice in Essay writing under the direction of 
one of the professors. During the first half of the Junior year the 
Juniors have exercises in the writing of essays and orations under 
the direction of the Professor of English Literature. The Juniors 
in the second term, and the Seniors in the first term write disserta- 
tions for public presentation. 

VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. 

Music is not. by law a regular study in the College curriculum. 
Opportunities are given, however, to such as desire it, to take les- 
sons upon the organ or piano, or in vocal training. The charges 
are as follows: 



72 Iowa Agricultural College. 

Lessons upon the piano or organ, per term of twenty lessons, 
ten dollars. 

For use of piano, or organ, two hours daily practice, 50 cents 
per month. 

For nse of piano or organ, one hour daily practice, 25 cents per 
month. 

Chorus lessons, one lesson per week, one dollar per term of ten 
weeks. 

Harmony lessons, in classes, five dollars per term of ten weeks- 

No pupils taken for less than one half term. 

THE LIBRARY. 

The Library now numbers about six thousand volumes. It is 
made up almost entirely of new books, purchased since the opening 
of the College; they are bound in half calf, library style, and sub- 
stantially covered with strong brown paper. These have all been 
selected with reference to the wants of the departments, the aim 
being to build up a working library which shall furnish the students 
and officers of the College, who are pursuing investigations beyond 
the ordinary text books, with the best authorities and works of ref- 
erence. It is not the intention of the College to furnish in its 
library simply a means of amusement, and while its officers hope to 
see students use the books freely, they expect that such use shall 
be in all cases with a definite object in view. As the student's stay 
in college is snort, and his time consequently of the greatest value. 
lie cannot afford to waste it in reading worthless books, nor even 
in desultory reading of good books. It is therefore urged upon stu- 
dents that they lay out for themselves courses of reading and study 
in the library, under the advice of the Librarian, or of some of the 
Professors. It is urged further that students make frequent use of 
the books of reference recommended by the teachers of the various 
college studies. 

The library is open for consultation, or forthe drawing of books 
during tin 1 day and evening, from 2 P. M. to 9 P. M. 



/<<"■" Agricultural College. 7:! 

DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 

REQUIREMENTS FOB ENTRANCE. 

AGE. 

1. The age of students seeking admission to the Agricultural 
College must be sixteen years or over. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION AND CERTIFICATES. 

•2. Candidates for membership in the Freshman class must give 
evidence of a thorough know J edge of English Grammar, English 
Analysis, Arithmetic, Human Physiology, and (except to enter the 
Veterinary Course) Algebra through simple equations. Proficien- 
cy in these studies maybe proved either by actual examinations 
held at the opening of the term, or by a certificate given on spec- 
ial examinations by either the principal of a high school or 
a County Superintendent. Teacher's certificates will not he 
received. 

S1TB-FRESHMAN CLASS. 

:;. For the purpose of giving a better preparation for the Fresh- 
man class to the students who come from sections of the State 
where the schools are defective, a limited number will receive in- 
struction in English Analysis, Human Physiology, and the ele- 
ments of Algebra and Geometry. But students are not advised 
to come until they are prepared to enter the Freshman class. Stu- 
dents entering this class must, hereafter, show by examination or 
certificate a thorough knowledge of English Grammar and Arith- 
metic. 

HOW TO ENTER TI I E A( HUCV LTURAL ( OLLP^GE. 
Those who desire to enter the Agricultural College at the open- 
ing of the spring term, March, 1882, or for the fall term which com- 
mences .July 18 1882, will comply with the following directions: 

1. Write the President, if possible, before the first of February, 
asking for a card of inquiry. It will be mailed to you at once. 
THE C \UI) OK [NQUIRY. 

The card of inquiry to be sent on application, contains the fol- 
lowing questions to be answered and returned by mail. 
Questions Respecting Matters Essential to Admission. 
1. Are you sixteen years old, or older? 

:,'. An- yon proficient in the studies required for admission to the Fresh- 
man class? 
:;. Will you, if admitted, remain one entire term, unless prevented by 
sickness or unforeseen misfortune? 



74 Iowa Agricultural College, 

Questions not Essential to Admission. 
1. Do you intend to complete one of our (ionises of study? 
~'. What is your father's occupation? 
3, Do yon desire to p iv a limited portion of your expenses in work? 

2. On receiving the card of inquiry, write an answer opposite each 
question in the list; then enclose and mail to the President. If the 
answers you give accord with the "Requirements for Entrance,"* a 
card of admission will he sent you. 

3. When you arrive, at the opening of the term, present this card 
of admission to the Treasurer; select your room; pay the rent; 
make your deposit, and, without loss of time, show your receipt 
therefor to the President at his office. If you have not a certificate 
of proficiency in the studies required, you will then secure a card 
of examination. 

4. Attend punctually every examination at the time and place* 
indicated on the card. When all the examinations are completed 
and your standing therein marked on the card, return it to the 
President. If you have passed the studies required with a stand- 
ing of 3 or over, (4 being perfect), you will then sign the Student's 
Record Book and Contract and secure a card of classification. 

5. Present the card of classification to each of the teachers hav- 
ing charge of the classes to which you are assigned, and attend 
thereafter every recitation of the term. 

The contract signed by every student upon entering the College 
each year is as follows: 

We, the Faculty of the Iowa Agricultural College, hereby agree that we 
will guarantee to the students of 1882 all the privileges and instruction set 
forth in the College Catalogue, and that the laws we make shall be simply 
for their advancement and the good government of the institution. 

A. S. WELCH, President. 
We, the students, hereby agree on entering the College in 1882, that we 
will respect its laws, and, except incase of illness, unforeseen misfortune, 
or the necessity of leaving to teach school, remain the entire term (whether 
first or second) on which we enter. 

S'lTPENTS EXPENSES. 
TUITION. 

1. Xo charge is made for tuition. 

BOARD, WASHING, ETC. 

2. For board, washing, heating lighting, and cleaning the Col- 
lege building, students pay what the items actually cost the insti- 
tution. Injury to College property, of whatever sort, will be 
charged to the author, when known; otherwise to the section or 
the entire bodv of students. 



towa Agricultural College. 75 

Students boarding in the Main College building furnish their 
own bedding, and all furniture for their rooms, excepting bed- 
steads, washstands, tables, and wardrobes. All young men are 
required to supply themselves with uniforms. Sec School of Mili- 
tary Sciences, page 61. 

CURRENT EXPENSES. 

:;. The current expenses of students boarding in the Main Col- 
lege building during the year 1881 were as follows: 

Board, per week S2.2~> 

Lighting and heating, per week. 40 

Incidentals, per week 21 

Room Rent, per term. $ .75 to 1.60 

Washing, average per dozen 50 

.Janitor's Fee, for students not boarding in the building, per 

term 3.00 

Board in Boarding Cottage, per week 2.00 

DEPOSIT. 

4. As security for the payment of his monthly bills, each stu- 
dent, at the opening of the term, deposits with the Treasurer the 
sum of twenty dollars. This deposit will be returned on final set- 
tlement at the close of the term. 

.MONTHLY SETTLEMENT. 

5. All bills for each month must, without fail, be settled at the 

Treasurer's office on the second Saturday of the month following. 
Those who neglect this settlement cannot be permitted to remain 
in the College. 

THE DI XI XO ROOM. 

<i. The dining room will be opened on the evening preceding 
the respective days on which the spring and fall terms commence. 
No allowance on board bills is made for absences of less than one 
weeks duration. Students and others bringing friends to its 
tables are required to pay for such twenty-five cents each meal. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

7. Text-books and stationary may be purchased from the Col- 
lege Book-store at ten per cent advance on cost. Our stock is 
bought at publisher's prices. 

(AUK OF MONEY. 

Students are advised to keep their money and other valuables 
in the College Safe. While doing all in their power to prevent 
Losses and punish theft the officers will not be responsible for 
money or articles lost or stolen from the persons or rooms of 
students. 



7<i Iowa Agricultural College 

MAXl T AL LABOR. 
The following iules regulating manual labor have heen made by 
the Board of Trustees, it will be seen that no student can pay 
more than from a third to a half of his expenses, in work: 

1. The manual labor required by law of students in the College, 
is divided into two kinds: viz., uninstructive labor, which shall be 
compensated by the payment of wages; and instructive labor 
which shall be compensated by the instruction given and the skill 
acquired. 

2. Uninstructive labor shall comprise all the operations in the 
work-shop, garden, upon the farm and elsewhere, in which the 
work done accrues to the benefit of the College and not to the ben- 
efit of the student. Instructive labor shall embrace all those oper- 
ations in the workshop, museum, laboratories, experimental 
kitchen, upon the farm and garden, in which the sole purpose of 
the student is the acquisition of skill and practice. 

8. Students shall engage in instructive labor in the presence 
and under the instruction of the professor in charge according to 
the statements made in each of the courses of study. 

4. The labor furnished by the schools of Agriculture, of Veter- 
inary Science, and of Engineering is given by each exclusively to 
its own special students. 

.">. The details supplied by the needs of the Main Building and 
other departments will be given by the President on nomination 
by the heads of departments exclusively to the most faithful and 
meritorious students of the course in the Sciences Related to the 
Industries. 

(i. Uninstructive Labor is paid for rigidly according to value as 
settled by comparison with regular labor. 

GOVERNMENT. 
The crowded buildings of the Agricultural College and the 
nature of ils exercises, complicated as they are by manual labor, 
niakeorder, punctuality, and systematic effort indispensable. This 
institution can therefore offer no inducements to the idler or self- 
indulgent. Those, moreover, who are too independent to submit 
to needful authority, or too restless to accept wholesome restraint. 
are advised to go where the courses of study are milder and the 
requirements are consequently less. The education attained here 
is the result of energetic effort made possible by a uniform system 
of conduct and study. The following regulations give the institu- 



Iowa Agricultural College. 77 

tion the highest efficiency and secure to the student the Largest 
possible return for time and expense. 

1. The hours from seven to ten o'clock on week-day evenings, 
ami from 7::i<> v. m. to 12 M., and from 1 P. M. to 5 p. M. of all week- 
days except Saturday, are employed in study recitation and 
labor. 

2. Students must attend punctually all exercises of the classes 
to which they belong, except in cases of illness or unavoidable 
detention. 

:!. When students have for the above reasons been absent from 
an\ exercise, they shall, in person, as soon as possible, present 
their reasons for such absence to the President. If absent from 
any recitation they shall without delay obtain from the professor 
in charge a written recomendation for excuse for such absence, 
which shall be presented to the President for approval. .No one is 
permitted to attend a second recitation after an unexcused 
absence. 

4. Students boarding and rooming in any building on the Col- 
lege Ground shall be subject to the same regulations as those board- 
ing and rooming in the Main College buildiag. 

•I. Students boarding outside the College Grounds shall, as far 
as possible, keep study hours in their rooms. In the intervals be- 
tween recitations at the college buildings they shall remain in the 
chapel, keeping such order as is essential to uninterupted study. 
Access to the rooms and halls of the sections require special per- 
mission. 

6. The captains of sections in the dormitories shall report the 
condition of the order in their respective sections to the President 
at such times as he may designate. 

PROHIBITORY. LAWS <>F rm-: COLLEGE. 

1. students may not leave the vicinity of the college buildings 
at any time without permission from the President. General per- 
mission to be absent on Saturday is granted by the President. 

2. Loud talking, whistling, scuffling, gathering in halls and 
staircases, and boisterous and noisy conduct, are at all limes for- 
bidden. 

;;. During study hours, when not engaged in work or recitation, 
students may not leave their rooms except for unavoidable 
reasons. 



78 Iowa Agricultural College. 

4. At ten o'clock r. M., lights shall be extinguished, and from 
this time to the rising bell no student may be out of his room, 
except for serious reisons, nor shall he in any way disturb his 
neighbors. 

5. Students shall not deface by marking, cutting, or otherwise 
any buildings, walls or furniture belonging to the College. 

(>. Students shall not abstract or remove any article, whether 
clothing, food, furniture, tools, fruit, flowers, or any other property 
belonging to the College. Damage, destruction, or theft of prop- 
erty, when not more then one dollar in value, will be punished by 
line double the amount, but when exceeding that sum the case will 
be handed over to the civil authorities. 

7. Card playing and other games of chance, cooking, and the 
use of tobacco and intoxicating beverages, in any of the rooms of 
the College buildings, and smoking on the College Grounds are 
strictly forbidden. 

LITER Alt Y SOCIETIES. 

Xo literary, scientific, or other society shall he organized with- 
out the approval of the President and Faculty. The existing soci- 
eties, four in number, meet on Saturday evenings and close their 
sessions at or before 10:15. Students not attending the meetings of 
these societies shall observe the order and quiet required on other 
evenings of the week. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP AND RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION. 

The Faculty require in and about the College buildings such 
quiet and decorum as are fitting to the observance of the Sabbath. 
Officers and students gather daily in the chapel for public wor- 
ship. A Bible (dass. led by some older student, has its exercises on 
Sunday, at 1 P. M. The students' prayer meeting is held on Sunday 
evening, and on Sunday afternoon at 2:30 a discourse is given in 
the chapel by the President, one of the Professors or a clergyman 
invited for the occasion. The object of these sermons is to empa- 
si/.e and enforce the principles of the Christian religion, but, in a 
State institution like this, it would be manifestly improper to 
teach or to controvert the tenets of sectarianism. 



Ioica Agricultural College. 79 

INDEX. 

Agriculture 50. 

Anatomy of Domestic Animals 56. 

Barns 22. 

Biolog] 66. 

Boarding Cottage 21. 

Botany 57, 66. 

Buildings 21. 

Calendar 3. 

Catalogue of Students 13-18. 

Chemical and Physical Hall 21. 

Chemistry 58, 65. 

Clinics 59. 

Course in Agriculture 30-32. 

Course in Civil Engineering 3(3-38. 

Course in Mechanical Engineering 33-35. 

Course in the Sciences related to the Industries 25-29. 

Course in Veterinary Science 39-40. 

Creamery 22. 

Degrees 46-49. 

Dissertations 46. 

Domestic Eeouionv 61. 

Entrance Requirments 73. 

Examinations 73. 

Expenses 74. 

Faculty 5-6. 

Farm House 22. 

Forestry 51. 

General Course 25. 

Geology 68. 

Goverement 70. 

Graduates 7-12. 

Graduation 25, 30, 33, 36, 39, 59. 

Grounds 22. 

Histology 57. 



80 Iowa Agricultural College. 

Historical ]!>. 

Horticultural Building 21. 

Horticulture .11. 

Labor 7(5. 

Laws 77. 

Library 72. 

Literature and Language 69. 

Location 20. 

Main College Building 21. 

Manual Labor 7<>. 

Mathematics <>2. 

Meetings of the Board 4. 

Military Science (il . 

Mixed Optional Courses 45. 

Music 71. 

North Hall 21. 

Officers of the Board 4. 

( )rganization 23. 

Pathology 57. 

Philosophy 68. 

Physics <>;;. 

Physiology 57. 

Post-Graduate Studies 4!>. 

School of Agriculture 80-32, 50-52. 

School of Engineeirng 33-38, 53-55. 

School of Veterinary Science 39-40, 56-60. 

South Hall 22. 

Special Studies 28. 

Sub-Freshman Studies 45. 

Therapeutics 58. 

Thesis 4(>. 

Time Table 41-44, 60. 

Trustees 4. 

Veterinary Medicine 58. 

Workshop --. 

/oology oil, 07. 



\f, V. * * * * .+ 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



3 0112 111987332